Whats it all about? -  Blood Quantum (81 views) Notify me whenever anyone posts in this discussion.Subscribe
 
From: blackgold518/13/02 6:02 AM 
To: All  (1 of 40) 
 577.1 

Blood Quantum Does Not Determine
Identity Petition

http://www.petitiononline.com/0001/petition.html

I thought it best to look further with this topic (and I'll probably be reading a lot more about it), so decided to post another article as well entitled:

Blood Quantum
and Survival
By Steve Russell

http://www.imdiversity.com/villages/native/article_detail.asp?Article_ID=4172

Forum site: http://forums.delphiforums.com/586246532 "Job Hunting Made Easy"



Edited 8/13/2002 6:26:58 AM ET by blackgold51
 
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From: Herringchoke8/16/02 11:09 PM 
To: blackgold51  (2 of 40) 
 577.2 in reply to 577.1 
Thank you, once again, for posting an interesting article on a disturbing subject.

Herringchoke

 

 
From: blackgold518/17/02 12:31 PM 
To: Herringchoke  (3 of 40) 
 577.3 in reply to 577.2 

I want to hear some feedback about this, but feel I may be treading on a topic that is extremely controversial among all indian people. If we can open a discussion, please tell me how this can be done. I'd really like to know more.

Thanks for responding.

Forum site: http://forums.delphiforums.com/586246532 "Job Hunting Made Easy"

 

 
From: Sheridan Murphy (AIMFL)8/17/02 12:52 PM 
To: blackgold51  (4 of 40) 
 577.4 in reply to 577.3 


>I want to hear some feedback about this, but feel I may be treading >on a topic that is extremely controversial among all indian people. >If we can open a discussion, please tell me how this can be done. >I'd really like to know more.

Its not quite as controversial as one might think.

The petition, in my opinion is flawed in that it states that no government should determine bq or standards for defining members of an Indigenous Nation. That is flawed in the sense that every single nation that has ever existed has had methods for determining its citizenship. The United States of America has its standards, Finland, Norway, Cuba, Estonia, Niger do-as do the various Indigenous nations.

Prior to the arrival of Columbus citizenship was determined by birth into a nation and citizenship also was determined by clan, tiyospaye, society etc. Those remain traditional Indigenous governmental methods of determining citizenship.

The United States of America and Canada did impose enrollment/status for a variety of reasons, some as nefarious as the petition described-others for such innocous reasons as to determine to whom went what via treaty obligations (the few the US adhered to, and then usually the commods were/are rotten)

By the latter part of the 20th century most of the Howard-Wheeler Act/Indian Reorganization Act tribal governments had sole control (almost all do today) of determining methods for citizenship. The range goes from 1/2 to 1/64th and in a handful of tribes lineal descent qualifies. All determined by the voting members of that Nation.

There are those who eschew enrollment, such as in Florida the Independent Traditional Seminole Nation, or nationally folks like Peltier and others. However they legally fall into a caveat created in the 1970's by most tribal constitutions and subsequent federal laws as they are "eligible for enrollement"/

While there is no question that there are inherent flaws in the system and that there needs to be change. That change needs to come nation by nation from within that nation as to how they desire to determine their citizenship. thats sovereignty in action.

 

 
From: blackgold518/17/02 6:55 PM 
To: Sheridan Murphy (AIMFL)  (5 of 40) 
 577.5 in reply to 577.4 

Thank you for responding. I'm afraid I haven't understood everything you have said but will try to follow you.
One of the articles also mentioned that while some indians were not in favor of blood quantum guidelines, others favor it - perhaps, those are people who have been able to be enrolled in the tribe of their ancestors. Overall, how do you feel that native americans view the issue of blood quantum, especially those who do not meet eligibility requirements, of which there are probably many?

What does it mean to "eschew enrollment..." And, is Leonard Peltier still incarcerated? If each nation wants to be responsible for determining enrollment, would the BIA stand in their way, or allow them the freedom to decide for themselves? And, exactly what does sovereignty involve with indian people and how much are they not subjected to laws of the U.S. (or are they)? I hope I am making myself understood.

Forum site: http://forums.delphiforums.com/586246532 "Job Hunting Made Easy"

 

 
From: Sheridan Murphy (AIMFL)8/17/02 7:05 PM 
To: blackgold51  (6 of 40) 
 577.6 in reply to 577.5 
>Overall, how do you feel that native americans view the issue of >blood quantum, especially those who do not meet eligibility >requirements, of which there are probably many?

I think its a question of sovereignty, every Nation is allowed to determine its standards for citizenship. So too should Indian Nations. I think those that come under bq should recognize this, they have family and are recognized etc.

>What does it mean to "eschew enrollment..."
To refuse to be enrolled.

>if each nation wants to be responsible for determining enrollment, >would the BIA stand in their way, or allow them the freedom to >decide for themselves?

Essentially the BIA has been out of the enrollment business for a couple of decades. They issue CDIB cards if the tribe doesn't-but the tribe determines status not the BIA.

>And, exactly what does sovereignty involve with indian people and >how much are they not subjected to laws of the U.S. (or are they)? I >hope I am making myself understood.

Thats something the courts of the US still haven't quite figured out and is the battleground in which AIM and other Indigenous rights groups work from Canada to Chile.

 

 
From: wanbli5298/17/02 9:58 PM 
To: blackgold51  (7 of 40) 
 577.7 in reply to 577.5 
Yes, Leonard is still incarcerated. And the worst part is, his incarceration was based on an expert witness saying Indians were "racially prone to violence." The court admitted they had no evidence.

More on-topic. Legally, blood quantum as enforced by the BIA is unconstitutional. I'll try to get the case for you. Cherokees don't recognize it at all, and simply allow anyone who can prove their relations to enroll. On the other hand, the Hopis have 1/2 as the requirement.

Alaskans and Hawaiians have their own rules that I'm not too familiar with.

State recognition, to put it bluntly, is a joke. (Cherokees of Georgia, anyone?)

 

 
From: blackgold518/18/02 10:49 AM 
To: Sheridan Murphy (AIMFL)  (8 of 40) 
 577.8 in reply to 577.6 

So, since bq eligibilities can range from 1/4 to 1/64th for enrollments then anyone with native ancestry can apply in hopes of receiving a CDIB card from the tribe of their ancestors?

And, again, to eschew or refuse tribal enrollment and become an independent nation as the tribe you mentioned, why would a tribe seek such an alternative? Is this done to establish sovereignty? In the meantime, what laws do the tribes recognize - only tribal laws?

Forum site: http://forums.delphiforums.com/586246532 "Job Hunting Made Easy"

 

 
From: blackgold518/18/02 10:59 AM 
To: wanbli529  (9 of 40) 
 577.9 in reply to 577.7 

It seems the same with the 'one drop rule' with black people, that the government instituted during slavery and which many biracial, triracial and multiracial black persons, which has now changed. As with the new 2000 Census, which now gives a person the choice for more than one racial classification. It seems a similar thing with blood quantum for indian people. I recall discussion previously about this issue with the 'one drop rule,' but did not know, until now, that it also affected indian people (with blood quantum requirements), again coming from the government through the BIA.

Yes, please post the information. It's good the tribes have the final say-so, about who can enroll. However, if the tribe refuses someone enrollment, can they go to the BIA for assistance? Would you say the tribes are more lenient than the BIA?

Forum site: http://forums.delphiforums.com/586246532 "Job Hunting Made Easy"

 

 
From: wanbli5298/18/02 2:19 PM 
To: blackgold51  (10 of 40) 
 577.10 in reply to 577.9 
Legally, the BIA cannot have any say in citizenship matters. Not that the US has ever been concerned with legalities.
 

 
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