Black Native Americans -  East Vs West Of The Mississippi? (222 views) Notify me whenever anyone posts in this discussion.Subscribe
 
From: ctj52710/10/02 4:38 PM 
To: All  (1 of 16) 
 615.1 
Osiyo, posters...

And a question...

Is there a difference as regards how mixed bloods of indigenous/african roots approach being a native which are
different, i. e., as regards having grown up on one side
of the Big Muddy instead of the other?

That is?

Is the experience of growing up indigenous as regards the
histories of native folk on either side of the Mississippi
that different?

I don't know...

You tell me, posters!

I'll be waiting...

Peace...

 
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From: wanbli52910/14/02 5:50 PM 
To: ctj527  (2 of 16) 
 615.2 in reply to 615.1 
Well, those of us on the west side generally have grown up more Indian, except for a few nations lucky enough to stay in the east.

Where I was born, you'd have to look under a microscope to find a black person. Other than Indians, the main minorities were Mongolians and gypsies.

 

 
From: ctj52710/15/02 9:41 AM 
To: wanbli529  (3 of 16) 
 615.3 in reply to 615.2 
Osiyo, young brave...

And to say the least?

What was it like to grow up among native folk--and know you
were also a person of african descent?

Some on this side of the Big Muddy--and who are also a minority
in a tribe of indigenous people--merely opt out for identifying
themselves as being another indigenous tribe member...

So I'm curious as to why you didn't as well?

Y'see, on this side of the Big Muddy, there are as many
unanswered questions as to how and why other indigenous folk did
and do relate to us 'black indians', as they are about those about why the white representatives of the non-native folk tried to 'pencil' us out of existence...

Period...

My point?

I hope that you'll be able to reveal as much about the people
you lived or live in the midst of as about yourself...

Ok?

Ok!

Good luck and best wishes with your hopes, dreams, aspirations...

Peace...



Edited 10/15/2002 9:49:46 AM ET by CTJ527
 

 
From: wanbli52910/15/02 11:47 AM 
To: ctj527  (4 of 16) 
 615.4 in reply to 615.3 
It was confusing. I quickly learned there was a caste system among mixed-race individuals. And if you're NDN and black or NDN and Asian, you're at the bottom.
 

 
From: ctj52710/15/02 2:35 PM 
To: wanbli529  (5 of 16) 
 615.5 in reply to 615.4 
What?!?

No equality on the basis of one's merits et al there either???

I'm shocked, shocked that any indigenous band/tribal member/chief
isn't another Sitting Bull!

Or Tecumseh?

Or Osceola?

Sorry...

Osceola and Tecumseh were mulattos...

Duh...

Not like the ones who say I don't know what I'm talking about
elsewhere?

Ahem...

(Smile)...

Seriously...

People are people...

Some are a part of the problem and by the way of default...

Others truly strive to be a part of the solution...

Remember them as well...

Beyond that/

More details...

Please...

Thanks in advance!

Later...

Peace...

 

 
From: wanbli52910/15/02 8:24 PM 
To: ctj527  (6 of 16) 
 615.6 in reply to 615.5 
Indians are fine with me. Net Indians might be a little skeptical about a black man from Pine Ridge, but other than that, no problem.

I was referring to mixed-race, which I mostly learned about here in Cali. (In fact, J Landrith has me listed as a racist b/c I revealed his connections to a "Cheyenne" from Germany named Hyemeyohsts Storm.)

 

 
From: ctj52710/16/02 9:45 AM 
To: wanbli529  (7 of 16) 
 615.7 in reply to 615.6 
Cool...

Even we're just getting to know each other too...

Right?

Right...

Take care...

Later...

Peace...

 

 
From: ctj52710/16/02 3:20 PM 
To: wanbli529  (8 of 16) 
 615.8 in reply to 615.2 
The purpose and intent behind my words and deeds is to:

1) Reclaim my own indigenous heritage...

2) Learn more about the various other aspects of being a person
who has indigenous and african forebears...

3) Find out if we have a common cause:

(Which given the various accounts about the double standards
being applied to identified and non-identified native folk
among some of the bands/tribes/band and tribe leaders et al
leads me to believe that we do)...

4) And, more to the point, heal the wounds or undo the damage--
which led to bad relations between the heretofore
identified american or african-american forebears
of both--who had been supporters of each other efforts to either
hold on to the liberty and freedom they stole back--or the other's efforts to hold on to dominion over the lands their people had lived on for ages--
via their descendents in the here and now...

So now you do know who I am and what I'm about...

So where do we go from here?

I await your further replies...

Take care...

Peace...



Edited 10/16/2002 5:42:19 PM ET by CTJ527
 

 
From: AMAIGEYA110/17/02 10:13 AM 
To: ctj527  (9 of 16) 
 615.9 in reply to 615.5 
Hello,
I get tired of hearing about how Osceola, Sequoyah, Tecumseh etc. all had white fathers. I know in some cases it may be true but everytime you see some kind of important figure in Native history there seems to always be a little note attached that says such and suches father was said to be a white man. I'm not trying to say that you were wrong or anything it just irks me sometimes.

Holla

 

 
From: ctj52710/17/02 11:27 AM 
To: AMAIGEYA1  (10 of 16) 
 615.10 in reply to 615.9 
Osiyo, poster...

But I'm afraid that my personal commentary to the young black brave
left you with the opposite impression than what I intended it to...

My point was and is that there is also a wee bit of hypocrisy and
doubledealing which reflects how some indigenous folk feel and
think about us as well...

So let's face up the facts...

Most other ethnic groups expect us to just identify us as one of
their own...

Not honor and cherish our own unique heritage?

Hence my guess at one of the reasons between conflicts
between eastern and western black native youth at one recent powow?

But that's not the only reason...

Y'see, I honor both Tecumseh and Osceola because they were the exceptions to the general rule...

And in the forefront of the past struggles were people of both
indigenous and african descent...

But we are a new people in a new land...

And we must be true to who we are...

For our own sakes...

My point?

Blacks of whatever background tend to react and overreact to
whatever somebody else claims about me/you/us/them...

Instead?

We must take on the challenge of defining ourselves in our own
best interests...

So it's long overdue that some other black indians quit trying
so hard to just be 'accepted'...

Instead?

It's about one's self-respect...

So I urge still established black indians tribes to send forth
their representatives to tell us more about their history/heritage/traditions et al via these threads and this board...

After all: Shared knowledge makes us all more powerful...

Take care...

Peace...

 

 
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