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Race Day medication reform   Horse Racing

Started by LyndaP31; 55263 views.
LyndaP31

From: LyndaP31

8/10/11

in 2012

http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/articles/64477/no-salix-in-graded-stakes-for-2yos-in-2012

The American Graded Stakes Committee said Aug. 10 it will employ a pilot program that will ban race-day medications—primarily the anti-bleeding drug Salix—in graded 2-year-old stakes in 2012.

The policy will be evaluated at the end of next year, when a decision will be made whether to continue it or expand it to other graded stakes. The committee falls under the Thoroughbred Owners and Breeders Association



Read more: http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/articles/64477/no-salix-in-graded-stakes-for-2yos-in-2012#ixzz1Ufcr4LnG

Derby132

From: Derby132

8/10/11

I like that this is a small pilot program to try to evaluate the impact on the horses and the sport here.  The goal is a good one and should be pursued but the road to it's success could be difficult on many levels.  This will hopefully let them know what they need to prepare for and what to do to get there.  The elite horses at the graded levels that go on to breed being the goal, glad that seems to be the intention.
Greg J. (Wookster8)

From: Greg J. (Wookster8)

8/10/11

It is a start long overdue...
Amy (1pony)
Staff

From: Amy (1pony)

8/11/11

Keeneland presents American Graded Stakes Standings: Thinking Long-Term on Medication

Horsemen from around the U.S. that I’ve talked with in recent months are almost universally opposed to the growing movement to ban the raceday use of any medication in horses, particularly the anti-bleeder drug Lasix. Trainers are very concerned a Lasix ban will lead to fewer starts per horse, cost an owner more to treat exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage if Lasix is not permitted, and force horses to be laid up for months to recover from internal bleeding episodes at a time when runners are scarce and fields for many races are short.

 
Greg J. (Wookster8)

From: Greg J. (Wookster8)

8/11/11

While I don't always agree with Mr. Paulick, I agree 110% on this statement:

"While I understand both sides of this argument, I side with the Graded Stakes Committee. Someone has to be looking out for the best long-term interests of the game, and this reasonable decision does just that"

Of course Horsemen are pissed off about this call, but, this isn't all about them, it is all about the horse and the future in breeding sound horses here in the U.S. 

Baby steps? Yes, but still a step in the right direction.

Bravo!

Amy (1pony)
Staff

From: Amy (1pony)

8/11/11

Once again Greg you are so correct. Baby steps and if we keep breeding the inferior horse who bleeds we will keep racing weaker horses till we kill off the race horse as we know it today.
twigs6652

From: twigs6652

8/12/11

Very interesting article.  Are American horses the only horses that use lasix?  The article mentioned "overseas" horses don't unless they come here to race.  How do the "overseas" horses do without using the drug as in do they remain healthy enough to race?

I was also surprised to read that our horsemen are almost universally opposed to the ban!  Who is he talking about - breeders, owners trainers?  When I read things like this, I also wonder what else they are opposed to.  For example are they opposed to retirement funds for their horses which will cost them additional money?

Lauren

Amy (1pony)
Staff

From: Amy (1pony)

8/12/11

Lauren as far as I know Lasix is only allowed as a race day medication in North America ie America and Canada. Horses are trained differently in Europe than in America. Horses in Europe stay at their trainers farms and they have straight gallops these can include up and down hills. I believe the horses gallop and also do little wind spurt type faster gallops. Horses over there at times do bleed and they are put on a vets list and given time off, then hopefully when they race again they do not bleed. But I think they are only given 3 chances and if they bleed 3 times they are banned from racing there. So they have 2 options retire, or send to USA to race on Lasix. From what I have read our Lasix use is partly why European breeders do not breed to US Studs.

I agree with your second paragraph totally.

 

twigs6652

From: twigs6652

8/13/11

Thanks for your answer.  It was very good and understandable!

Do the horses bleed from their lungs?   If so, is that why the European training methods are different - to give their lungs a better chance of developing and/or being stronger?

Lauren

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