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Race Day medication reform   Horse Racing

Started by LyndaP31; 79190 views.
In reply toRe: msg 458
Amy (1pony)
Staff

From: Amy (1pony)

6/30/15

The calcium loss is the most disturbing to me

It’s no secret that furosemide (Lasix, Salix) is both effective in preventing or lessening exercise-induced pulmonary hemorrhage, or that the drug has been shown to make horses lose weight through dehydration—a side effect many people believe makes the substance attractive as a performance enhancer. Scientists at Kentucky Equine Research wanted to learn more about the drug’s dehydration impacts, and released a series of studies last month revealing new information about the amount of weight loss taking place after a dose of furosemide, and what’s going on with the equine body as a result.

http://www.paulickreport.com/horse-care-category/vet-topics/new-furosemide-research-reveals-unexpected-impacts-of-the-medication/

gunny101 (Cindy0326)

From: gunny101 (Cindy0326)

6/30/15

Oh, there are a number of things in this report that are really disturbing.

1. "add back" therapies are often not as effective when trying to counteract medically induced conditions - the jury is still out on why, but once one of an organism's system becomes unbalanced - such as the electrolyte balance mentioned here - a number of other systems are messed with because the body is a very complex organism. Electrolyte balance is crucial for heart function, for one. (Young race horses dropping dead from heart attacks, hmmmm....) Consequently, messing with one system often creates a domino effect on a number of other system's functions, and trying to measure precisely the ancillary effects and on which systems these occur is next to impossible short of years of longitudinal studies. Particularly in animal health, the funding dollars just ain't there for that type of study. (Note:  Also why using thyroid medication or extract in animals is so dangerous - thyroid regulates all the body's systems and messing around with it can have catastrophic effects as has been evidenced last year.)

2.  Guessed????  As in this quote:  Most horses’ diets are adequate to replenish those minerals within a few days following a race on furosemide, Pagan guessed, which means that this dehydration and mineral loss is unlikely to have a long-term effect on a horse’s health. He did voice concerns about whether the calcium losses could add up if a racehorse did not have a calcium-rich hay source, however. That tells me that this study was much less than exhaustive - in research, you don't "guess."  Rather, one identifies areas for additional investigation" and leaves it at that.  This report just tells me there are a whole lot of ancillary research that needs to be done and making the supposition that "add-back" therapy will suffice without follow-up study is simply sloppy work.

3.  This report just underlines that Lasix is being used primarily as a performance enhancing drug and not a clinically indicated medication.  This really calls up the ethics of vets who are routinely administering it - in fact, I'm not sure how they actually can get around the ethical issues and not be subject to veterinary malpractice.  This has really disturbed me for years - using a drug off-label is one thing.  Using a drug off-label primarily for performance enhancement falls outside the realm of medical practitioners.  In private practice, the vets I known wouldn't even fathom using Lasix except for issues such as heart disease. If racing authorities don't institute changes, then having animal welfare organizations bring malpractice suits against trainers' vets or at least hauling them before vet review boards is another avenue for forcing reform, IMHO.

This is just one of the reasons why racing professionals and governing agencies in other countries talk about the drug culture in U.S. racing - right now, sadly, THEY'RE RIGHT!!!

gerchgo

From: gerchgo

7/8/15

Sounds like things are getting better, note the last sentence in article.

Parkin said that for every previous injury, a racehorse's risk of fatal injury increases 30% based only on information submitted to the EID. The challenge, he said, is to get more information on each horse such as vet records, medical history, and training records.
http://www.bloodhorse.com/horse-racing/articles/92931/new-information-critical-to-injury-database

Derby132

From: Derby132

7/8/15

I wanted to post some of the key points from todays summit.  Will look them up.  One was how important it is to run 2 yo's.

Derby132

From: Derby132

7/8/15

Oh you caught that!  Yes!

  "It really is critical to start exercising horses as 2-year-olds," Parkin said.

gerchgo

From: gerchgo

7/8/15

That's the last sentence in regard to less injuries.
In reply toRe: msg 463
gunny101

From: gunny101

7/8/15

Let's look at that statement again.  He said "exercising" two-year-olds.  That's different from racing them.  He needs to clarify what he meant - in the statement as it stands, it sounds like he's referring to training rather than flat out competitive racing.

 

 

gerchgo

From: gerchgo

7/8/15

I think he meant racing, but he should clarify that!
Derby132

From: Derby132

7/8/15

Thanks to Teresa's coverage today we have the answer:

 

Teresa Genaro @BklynBckstretch 11h11 hours ago

Dr. Tim Parkin on Equine Injury Database: the earlier you start racing horses, the better for their bone health. Dismisses notion, based on research, that 2yo shouldn't race

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