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What it takes to rescue a horse   Horse Rescue Issues

Started by Ponytale1976; 1448 views.
Ponytale1976

From: Ponytale1976

11/30/09

Ok in light of things I keep seeing and reading I was wondering if the "Professional" rescues out there could chime in here and describe in detail what is involved with rescuing a horse.
SeeingSpot2

From: SeeingSpot2

11/30/09

I have always thought of "YOU" as one of the professional rescues! LOL

Keep up the good work!

MargieM17

From: MargieM17

11/30/09

She is. But I think she is asking for "others" to speak up.

Margie

In reply toRe: msg 1
Ponytale1976

From: Ponytale1976

11/30/09

I'll start since I started the thread.

First thing that needs to be done is you need to Register with your state as a non-profit corporation, in our state, PA this is a 2 page application and a $75 fee and is processed almost immediately. This has nothing to do with your 501(c)3 or tax exempt status, this is 100% neccesary to accept money from people in the form of donations for horse rescue. If you have skipped this step, you are operating illegally.

If you want to be a 501(c)3 then you would next need to fill out and file your form 1023 which is (I forget) ~13 pages and a filing fee of $300 or $750 depending on how many donations you will be taking in. This can take you up to a year to hear back on, but you may still carry on while waiting to hear back. This step is NOT neccesary, but is helpful.

You need to have an adequate facility for rescue. There should be shelter for each and every animal on the premises. If your shelter consists of run-in sheds they should be big enough for all of the horses to fit in comfortable. You will also need at least 1 stall where an injured horse could be kept quiet. In addition to shelter you will need adequate turn-out, my rule of thumb is if the animal can not canter comfortably around it's turn-out area, then the area is too small. Fencing should be safe and horse appropriate.

Funding- In order to be a rescue you need to have funding. Don't assume that donations will come in, and don't assume that animals will be quickly adopted out. Plan for the worst and hope for the best. This means that you will need to orchestrate fundraisers (bake sales, car washes, auctions, etc.). If you are a 501(c)3 you will want to write for grants, this take a LOT of hard work and many times you are rejected.

Knowledge- It's not enough to have a deep love for animals, you need to have the knowledge to properly care for them. You need to be able to tell when something is not right, you need to know when to call a vet, you need to know how to treat an injury or illness until a vet can arrive.

Access  to professionals- This is paramount. As a rescue, you will have large veterinary and farrier needs. You need to have a competant vet and farrier lined up that will be willing to work with horses of unknown backgrounds and tempermants. Also if you are not a skilled trainer, you will need access to one of these as well. An untrained horse has little chance of finding a new permanent home, and if the new home does not work out and the horse is returned still untrained it makes it even harder to adopt out.

Ok so we have all of our ducks in a row time to go get that rescue horse.

You will need to trailer the horse to the rescue or hire transport to trailer the horse to your rescue, if the horse is crossing state lines it needs a Coggins and  Health Cert (in most states). So before the horse even makes it to the rescue you are spending lets say $150 for Coggins, Health Cert and transport (this number can be dramatically more).

Quarentine- Your new horse arrives but he/she must be kept seperate for 30 days. In order to truly QT you should not be doing anything with your new horse during these 30 days as far as taking it out and riding it (unless you have a QT riding arena). So you have 30 days of care into your new arrival, figure another $150.

New arrival has unknown vaccination and deworming history. They will need all vaccs done and then repeated in 3 weeks. They will need a Power Pack, followed by Tapeworm, followed by Bot worming done on them. All of the above if done by yourself should run ~$110.

Hoof care- At the minimum your new arrival will require a hoof trim figure another $25

Health Exam- following the 30 days QT the horse should be examined by a veterinarian for health and soundness issues. Check eyes, mouth, heart, lungs, flex test legs. Majority will need their teeth floated as well at this point. X-rays, Ultrasounds, and Bloodwork may be needed at this stage. If your new rescue is a mare she needs to be pregnancy checked at this point too. Figure a minimum of $75 here qhich could go up into the thousands for complete diagnostics.

Treatment of any ailments. If your new arrival has soundness issues or other health problems they now need to be treated. This can range from $20 to the thousands again.

Training- The best chance at successful lifetime adoptions are well trained horses. Put as much training on your new rescue as the horse can physically and emotionally handle before making available for adoption.

Alright the horse is ready to be adopted!

Now you need to place ads, take pictures, take videos and PROMOTE!!!

You have to weed out unsuitable candidates and talk to tire kickers, you also need to check references on any applications received. Once you have an approved application you then need to show the horse to the prospective adopter, if they are a match then a farm check needs to be done, if the farm check works out well you get the adoption contract signed and send the horse home......phew thank god it's all over and done with

BUT WAIT

There is follow up, you need to make sure the horse is doing well, need pictures, need updates, need to go to farm and see horse...Ugh does this ever end?

NO.....you are responsible for the well being of this horse for life!

Ponytale1976

From: Ponytale1976

11/30/09

I was......was also busy typing up my repsonse.
WCodell

From: WCodell

11/30/09

Now multiply that by the number of horses you have. That is why I foster for Pure Thoughts. I can do my part to help the horses without getting over my head.

Guest

From: Guest

11/30/09

Wow, good start!

Under the "Knowledge" section, I'll add that if you are going to take naglect cases, you need to know about "refeeding syndrome," what it really is, how it affects vital organs, how to avoid it and what to watch for in case the worst happens.

In terms of adequate space, you should assume each horse will be with you a while.  Its almost impossible to predict which horses will be adopted quickly and which horses will take a while. 

 

Chris

Msg 8 of 69 to GuestGuest 
In reply toRe: msg 7
Guest

From: Guest

11/30/09

Forgot to add - be willing to honestly evaluate your own skill level.  If you're in over your head, make other arrangements that are best for the horse.  For example, training rambunctious young colts is definitely not my forte.  So, on the two occasions colts came along, we worked with other facilities who took them in to train and place while we took one of their elders that was not likely to be adopted.

 

Chris

Msg 9 of 69 to GuestGuest 
In reply toRe: msg 7
MargieM17

From: MargieM17

11/30/09

What do you think of Thrive for refeeding? It seems to be doing an amazing job with RMR's Dolly.

Margie

Guest

From: Guest

11/30/09

I followed the first part of Dolly's thread, but havent' read recently.    I dont' really have an opinion to speak of.  Can't argue with Dolly's results but I'm still not ready to throw out any kind of feed free choice to a starved horse.  I think I'd have to see more success stories to consider that. 

I'm also not sure the results justify the extra cost when what we've been doing seems to work well for us.

 

Chris

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