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The real world - Joe's monday   Horse Rescue Issues

Started by Guest; 14 views.
Guest

From: Guest

4/9/07

From Joe at TBfriends.com,

Monday, April 9th... I am a broken record. Morning after morning I ask for more foster homes to help with horses in trouble. The real world. When slaughter was put on hold there was no game plan. What to do with hundreds of doomed horses who wait at feed lots? The sadness grows larger each day. They are lucky if a flake of hay is tossed their way. Some are headed to slaughter in Mexico, and the road trip is brutal. We are not talking about old, worn out horses here. Many of the doomed horses are athletes, once sought after, and only a few years ago they would have brought good money from training barns. But the horse market continues to drown because of over breeding, high board rates, and trainers must pay big dollars for liability and workmans comp insurance. The reasons are many.

I feel horrible for the way I talked to a good friend. She has been my friend for more than 5 years, and we met because of horses. On Saturday my friend told me she decided to breed her 3 mares, and maybe in the future she could sell those 3 foals and make some money. Good grief. First thing out of my mouth was just how stupid are you? A not so nice thing to say, and I wanted to reach out and grab those words before they made a sound. I know I hurt her feelings. And so yesterday, on Easter Sunday, I took my friend to a feed lot in Elk Grove. Showed her the yearlings, and two year old youngsters. Standing in their own grime, hungry and depressed, waiting for the slaughter truck to take them where ever slaughter might be. And I said what I wanted to say, only this time I was much nicer. No one breeds their mare so the baby can stand in a feed lot and wait to be butchered. Maybe in a horse market that was thriving, then breeding would be okay. But take a look at these babies. I am sure in the beginning their owners were thrilled. What went wrong? I asked my friend why would she bring more youngsters into this world when there is a really good chance their life will be priced by the pound? My friend petted very cute faces, and before we left she bought a golden quarter horse yearling with a star on his head shaped like an ice cream cone. 45 cents a pound. Later we had iced mochas at Starbucks, and she said thank you. No way is she breeding her 3 mares.

-Joe Shelton TBfriends



Edited 4/9/2007 7:50 pm ET by craigintexas
  • Edited 4/9/2007 8:30 pm ET by craigintexas
Msg 2 of 79 to GuestGuest 
In reply toRe: msg 1
Tankah

From: Tankah

4/9/07

Thank you for your intelligent words and actions.

Ann I.

Msg 3 of 79 to GuestGuest 
In reply toRe: msg 2
Guest

From: Guest

4/9/07

Bravo, Joe... Craig, Bravo as well.

A little "tough love" speaks volumes. Joe,  You're friend is grateful for having you and so are we.

Thank you.

Donna



Edited 4/9/2007 12:30 pm ET by tbred99
  • Edited 4/9/2007 12:31 pm ET by tbred99
In reply toRe: msg 3
rainydayride

From: rainydayride

4/9/07

Note the heading of this thread...

The words are today's diary entry by Joe of TBFriends in Woodland,CA.

http://www.tbfriends.com/

Msg 5 of 79 to GuestGuest 
In reply toRe: msg 1
Guest

From: Guest

4/9/07

Good for Joe. He always says it
like it is.
Msg 6 of 79 to GuestGuest 
In reply toRe: msg 1
Barbarolvr

From: Barbarolvr

4/9/07

Thanks for posting Joe's morning bulletin. This guy really "gets it". It is amazing how many folks continue to breed away and really have no plans for those babies.
Several F.O.B.s asked this very question a few months ago: "what are our plans for the horses saved from slaughter." They were told they had no vision and were thinking negatively. I call it thinking realistcally. While our goal is certainly to shut down the horse slaughter industry, you had better be able to prove beyond any reasonable doubt that these animals have a better alternative. Just saying "we know they will be taken care of" is not enough. Especially for the horse vets, politicians and all others still standing against these bills. When asked why they are against the bills they all answer the same thing: "we have not seen any plans to show these horses will be better off". After reading Joe's Monday morning post, I guess he is asking this question too. All of us here are animal lovers and we certainly want to believe that there will be places for all these animals. But others want hard facts and that is what we must provide for them.
Msg 7 of 79 to GuestGuest 
In reply toRe: msg 1
Guest

From: Guest

4/9/07

Thanks for the post.

And, just think, we have a rancher for a President.

Rob

Msg 8 of 79 to GuestGuest 
In reply toRe: msg 1
Guest

From: Guest

4/9/07

With all of the horses Joe has to deal with, the kill buyers, the feed lots, and the calls from private owners wanting him to take their horses, he remains in favor of stopping slaughter now and does not consider it an acceptable option at any time. That speaks volumes.

Perhaps he has read the abundance of factual analysis available from kaufmanzoning, manes & tails, saplonline, and other resources too numerous to list. Have you? This information does not show that there will be no problems at all, no adjustment period, and no cases of abuse or neglect. That would be extremely unrealistic.

It does provide a firm foundation for the assertion that the problem will not cause an insurmountable crisis and this assertion is based on facts, economics, statistics, history, and the law. If you have carefully read all of these documents and still consider horse slaughter an acceptable alternative, then you disagree with Joe at TBfriends and many other horse rescuers like him who have been on the front lines of anti-slaughter for years.

Anti-slaughter advocates are emotionally invested in the welfare of horses but their conclusions regarding the outcome of a ban are based on well researched facts. I'll ask you the question I always ask and that no one who supports slaughter as an option has ever answered. When there were 14 slaughter houses butchering 348,000 horses in 1989-1990 and that dropped down to only a few plants butchering 43,000 in 2002, where was the much, much bigger crisis of unwanted horses that should have occurred?

Did you see any emotional pleas from the USDA, the Farm Bureaus, or the Horse Councils about all the abandoned horses in those years? Were there any articles about how horses were wandering the streets? None of these things happened and yet the number of horses that went unslaughtered was much higher than it would be if the ban were passed today. How do you explain that?

Msg 9 of 79 to GuestGuest 
In reply toRe: msg 8
Guest

From: Guest

4/9/07

I don't feel a need to explain anything to you to you. I just posted a portion of Joe's blog. It is what it is, the real world.
In reply toRe: msg 8
Guest

From: Guest

4/9/07

Several sources are telling me that dealers are starting to stockpile horses thinking that this stop to slaughtering in the US is temporary.   Now is the time to start reporting these people if they are not feeding their horses properly or letting wounded animals stand around untreated.  Not people like  Joe who have to work directly with the kill buyers but John and jane Q. Public who can easily explain their sighting by taking a wrong turn or riding their horse by or something.   Pester the animal control people until they force these dealers to take care of these animals properly.

They (dealers) are creating their own mess by continuing to buy horses with no outlet for them in the forseeable future.  By not feeding them they are pretty much guaranteeing they will not make any profit by sending them further to Mexico or Canada as they lose quite a bit 0f weight on the trip due to dehydration and just plain stress.   if the horse doesn't start out at good weight they'll not even get gas costs out of it after dressing out. 

It is unfortunate but there are probably going to be many  horses that need to be euthanized.  Perhaps healthy enough horses that are just not that adoptable whether because they are not pretty, wild, too old, have some issues, whatever.   We cannot save them all.   That's the first rule of rescue.  The second rule is We cannot save them all.  The third rule is:  Go see #1.    Euthanasia (or even a quick bullet to the head) is a much better alternative than ten more auctions or a long trip to Mexico or Canada.

As long as people keep breeding horses, particularly low end horses and refusing to take responsibility for them there is going to be a population that are "excess" for one reason or another.  The only reason might simply be they are sitting in the wrong market for their breed.  

Eventually the market will sort itself out.  The Kill buyers will either find another business or be picky about what they buy for resale.   But as long as there is no ban against shipping across the borders they will continue to stockpile as many as they can to have the fullest trucks they can, esp. to Mexico.  

  • Edited 4/9/2007 2:42 pm ET by summerhorse2
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