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DOG OF THE WEEK: Great Dane   Dogs

Started Jun-18 by PennyCC; 312 views.
PennyCC

From: PennyCC

Jun-18

DOG OF THE WEEK:  Great Dane

18 June 2017

Personality: Friendly, patient, & dependable.
Energy Level: Somewhat Active; Sedate, easygoing dogs, Danes enjoy a good walk two or three times daily.
Good with Children: Better with Supervision
Good with other Dogs: With Supervision
Trainability: Eager To Please
Height: 30-34 inches (male), 28-32 inches (female)
Weight: 120-200 pounds (male), 99-130 pounds (female) 
Life Expectancy: 6-8 years
Barking Level: Barks When Necessary

For more information about the Great Dane, see the AKC website or the Great Dane Club of America.

Dogs 101 : Great Dane

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In reply toRe: msg 1
PennyCC

From: PennyCC

Jun-18

5 Questions To Ask Yourself Before Getting a Great Dane

One of the most easily recognized dog breeds in the world, Great Danes are admired by all dog fanciers, so it’s no wonder you are considering adding one to your home. Maybe you watched Scooby Doo when you were little or enjoyed reading “Marmaduke” each Sunday. It could be that a friend of yours owns one and you just love her.

Whatever your reason, you are now contemplating adding a Dane to your household. And while they can be wonderful pets, there are some things to think about before bringing one home. Here are 5 questions you should ask yourself to make sure a Great Dane is right for you.

#1 – Do I Have The Room?

Great Danes aren’t just big, they are GIANT! You need to think logistically about whether you have room in your life for a Dane. As a puppy, they can fit most places, but do you have room for a full sized Dane crate in your house? Will an adult Dane fit in your car? What about his crate in your car? Can a Dane walk around your house without constantly breaking things? It’s something people don’t think about, but it can really impact your life. If not, you may want to get a smaller breed that will “fit” better in your home.

(read more)

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PennyCC

From: PennyCC

Jun-18

Great Danes because of their gentle temperament and large size make great service dogs for people who have difficulty walking. They are especially good for people with Parkinsons. 

Service Dog Project: Great Danes in Massachusetts

Inside look at Service Dog Project, an organization that trains Great Danes as Service Dogs for the Balance impaired (People with Parkinson's, veterans, MS, ...

In reply toRe: msg 3
PennyCC

From: PennyCC

Jun-18

10 Mighty Facts About Great Danes

1. The name is misleading. 

Despite being called the Great Dane, these dogs have ties to Germany, not Denmark. Some believe the name came about when French naturalist Georges-Louis Leclerc, Comte de Buffon happened upon the breed while traveling in Denmark in the early 1700s. He called the large dog "le Grande Danois" or Great Dane, and the name just stuck.  

2. Great Danes were once used for hunting boars.

The gigantic canines were probably bred from the Irish wolfhound and the old English mastiff. Great Danes were used to take down wild boars, and needed to be physically strong as well as brave. The powerful hunters were quick and deadly; their aggressive behavior wasn't anything like the temperaments of the Great Danes you see today.

3. Gentleness was bred into them.

Today Great Danes are known as gentle giants. As hunting became less popular, the breed evolved from vicious killers to show dogs. The fight has been bred out of the canines, and now modern day Danes prefer a more leisurely lifestyle. In fact, the docile pooches make good additions to families and are rarely aggressive. 

(read more)

In reply toRe: msg 4
PennyCC

From: PennyCC

Jun-18

Great Dane Facts

See MORE BREEDS here! http://bit.ly/1rcdA06 You'd think an animal so big as a Great Dane would be pretty intimidating, but these guys are just big cuddle bug...

In reply toRe: msg 5
PennyCC

From: PennyCC

Jun-18

Great Dane Puppy & Scooby Doo

Scooby and Friend have a play fight....

RGoss99

From: RGoss99

Jun-22

There is a general rule that when things have within their name (as in Danish), the name of a place (as in Denmark), they are not from there.

Schottisches are not from Scotland, Polkas are not from Poland, Gauze is not from Gaza, Damasque is not from Damascas, German Shepherds are not from Germany,

Hamburgers are not from Hamburgh, Chinze and china are not from China, Madras is not from Madras (India), Flamenco is not from Flanders, Sevillanes are not from Seville,

Most such names are coined somewhere else, to define where the object was last heard to have come from.

Where I live, the home language is Catalá, and while all the English standard dog breed names are known, the popular names are based on what they do: shepherds take of sheep, ratters catch rats, llibreres catsh llibres (rabbits/hares), etc.

PennyCC

From: PennyCC

Jun-22

That is very interesting, and a little disappointing. I really did think that German Shepherds were from Germany.

There are a few dog names that are appropriately named. Portuguese Water Dogs are really from Portugal, and Irish Water Dogs are really from Ireland. Must be the exceptions that proves the general rule.

Thank for those wonderful examples.

RGoss99

From: RGoss99

Jun-22

Perhaps I did not express myself well. Using your "Portuguese Water Dogs" as an example. This is an English name for them based on the fact that the first, or primary evidence of this dog came from Portugal, which does not mean that the breed started there, except in the context of its English name. For example, our "sheperds" are called German shepherds in America, but because Germany is our generic word for that part of Europe, but in England they are called "Alsacians" because when they first became know in England they came from the French side of the German border. 

To give an example in another context, what is called a passadoble in Spain, is a two step in English, but one stile of a two step is called a Polka, because that style reached English from Poland, however in poland they just call it a dance, because it is their typical dance. In Germany (just across from Alsace) in a region called the Rhineland, where the waltz type dance there involves a lot of arm twisting. When it reached France, because it was from Germany, it was called an Allemand (from French for German), but in American square dancing it is called "allamand left ...( with your left hand, do si do your won, etc.). A typical Jewish dance is the "hora" which is just taken from the Greek word for dance, as in choreography, (in ancient Greek plays, the "choir" both sang and danced). Today, with the exception of American high school production choirs, choirs do not dance.

You will find the same process in breeds of horses and cattle. Take horses for example, In the days of knights, for battle, being heavily armed, they required a huge war horse, that tired easily in charging. So when traveling their armor was on a donkey or pack horse, while they rode a faster light weight horse, but when a battle approached they dismounted, armed, and mounted their "high horse" (as in "don´t get on your high horse with me") for the battle. As fire arms became the weapons, cavalry moved to lighter faster horses, but the old war horses were moved to hauling heavy goods, so in Scotland, (Clyde Valley) , they became Clydesdales (as in some American beer adds), but they got other names in other countries). There are at least two places of origin for the breed apaloosa, a river in Idaho, and a tribe in the American S.E. either way it is an American breed, but its original ADN in from Andalusa in Spain, and from there the Magreb in North Africa, and from there Arabia.

[Note: I live in farm country in Spain, where dogs and horses are a fact of life. People here live in villages, historicly for protection, so they go out to work their farms, so the most common "breed" of tractor is green with yellow writing that says "John Deere".

PennyCC

From: PennyCC

Jun-23

You are a much smarter person than I. I think I got the gist of what you were explaining. That was a lot of information.

I just looked up war horses and found out that high quality war horses came from Spain. I can imagine that horses and dogs are very important in that country.

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