Poetry and thoughts -  Flying strait to his prey (306 views) Notify me whenever anyone posts in this discussion.Subscribe
 
From: APH0rism5-Oct 16:30 
To: All  (1 of 21) 
 1436.1 

A little something for Halloween!

 

 

What has the crow other birds don't have.

If only you could see how it flies strait to his prey.

And never worry of winds sway to behave.

Other than the sound of his own wings' fray.

 Apho

 

 
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From: Bike (URALTOURIST1) DelphiPlus Member Icon6-Oct 18:23 
To: APH0rism  (2 of 21) 
 1436.2 in reply to 1436.1 

In a strait jacket?  I understand some liberties but a casual misspelling is a bit much.

 

Warren
 
USCG Engineer 1961-1982
 
 
 

 
From: The Moth (Cecropian)7-Oct 5:38 
To: APH0rism  (3 of 21) 
 1436.3 in reply to 1436.1 

It's straight.

A strait is a body of water.

 

 

 
From: misspig9y7-Oct 12:46 
To: APH0rism  (4 of 21) 
 1436.4 in reply to 1436.1 

From "Upon Appleton House, to My Lord Fairfax" by Andrew Marvell:

[...]

But all things are composed here
Like nature, orderly and near;
In which we the dimensions find
Of that more sober age and mind,
When larger sized men did stoop
To enter at a narrow loop;

 

As practising, in doors so strait,
To strain themselves through Heaven's Gate.

confounded

.poetryfoundation.org/poems/44689/upon-appleton-house-to-my-lord-fairfax

  • Edited 07 October 2018 12:47  by  misspig9y
 

 
From: Eliot (Elohimil)8-Oct 19:06 
To: All  (5 of 21) 
 1436.5 in reply to 1436.1 

'If only you could see how it flies strait to his prey.

 
Middle English:
shortening of Old French estreit ‘tight, narrow,’ from Latin strictus ‘drawn tight’ (see strict).
 
  • Edited 08 October 2018 19:08  by  Eliot (Elohimil)
 

 
From: Eliot (Elohimil)8-Oct 19:10 
To: misspig9y  (6 of 21) 
 1436.6 in reply to 1436.4 

Did you noticed, someone fixed the typo, it wasn't there yesterday...

 

 

 

 

 

 
From: Eliot (Elohimil)8-Oct 20:05 
To: Bike (URALTOURIST1) DelphiPlus Member Icon  (7 of 21) 
 1436.7 in reply to 1436.2 

sunglasses You have never read Shakespeare, the master of typos, have you?

What's done is done - Shakespeare Speaks

BBC Learning English Published on 4 Mar 2016
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o2khV2D4RcQ
Learn the modern-day meaning and use of this phrase from Shakespeare's Macbeth.

 

 

 

 

 
From: Bike (URALTOURIST1) DelphiPlus Member Icon8-Oct 20:11 
To: Eliot (Elohimil)  (8 of 21) 
 1436.8 in reply to 1436.7 

Current poets do not get the Elizabethan pass, to use it now is stilted and trying to seem more learned or stylish than it purports to be.

 

Warren
 
USCG Engineer 1961-1982
 
 
 

 
From: Cap_Crunch9-Oct 9:57 
To: Eliot (Elohimil) unread  (9 of 21) 
 1436.9 in reply to 1436.6 

The typo is not fixed there

Andrew Marvell, ‎Alexander Balloch Grosart - 1872

... age and mind, - \Vhen larger-siZEd men did stoop To enter at a narrow loop ; 30

As practising, in doors so strait, To strain themselves through Heaven's gate.

 

 

 
From: Cap_Crunch9-Oct 10:53 
To: APH0rism  (10 of 21) 
 1436.10 in reply to 1436.1 

I'll continue the 'Crow's flight" story for you...

Shortly, at CK's private Poetry site with success.

Whereas out of topic and disruptive spell-checkers,

Might have less spiteful access, just to impress.

                                               laughing

                                                           

 

 

 
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