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Ancient Words    Poetry and thoughts

Started 18/1/20 by Blackwy; 3128 views.
Blackwy

From: Blackwy

18/1/20

How far back in time could you go and still understand English?

        
 

If you had a time machine, how far back could you go and still understand English?

At what point in history would you not be able to understand the English language?

If you went back in time to the 1800's and 1700's, you'd probably still be okay.

In reply toRe: msg 1
Blackwy

From: Blackwy

18/1/20

This except is from the book 'Robinson Crusoe', in 1719:

"I, poor miserable Robinson Crusoe,
being shipwrecked during a dreadful storm in the offing, came on shore on this dismal, unfortunate island, which I called “The Island of Despair”

That's fairly easy to understand, but you might struggle with old slang words like 'batty fang' and 'kickerapoo'.

Yestervid 12 Oct 2015

- https://youtu.be/8fxy6ZaMOq8

sweat_smile

In reply toRe: msg 1
Blackwy

From: Blackwy

18/1/20

A FEW ANCIENT WORDS

batty fang - a beating
kickerapoo - dead
land pirates - highway robbers
gutfoundered - very hungry
whapper - a big lie
Nitsqueeger - Hairdresser
Xantippe - an ill tempered wife
Abbess - a nun
Thornback - a spinster
Barber-monger - a vain man
Bleater - someone who complains a lot
Brabble - to quarrel loudly
Crapulous - the feeling of being too full
Hugger-mugger - secretly
Lettice-cap - a medical device like a hair net
Pigarlik - a bald head
Petty fogger - a dodgy lawyer
Mumpsimus - the act of sticking to old mistaken beliefs about language and customs simply  out of habit

laughing

Guard101

From: Guard101

18/1/20

Brabble - to quarrel loudly

Same as Babble!!  laughing

Ennya

From: Ennya

19/1/20

blush No wonder many people remained ignorant, illiterate and never read anything !

  • Edited 19 January 2020 11:09  by  Ennya
Ennya

From: Ennya

19/1/20

In our lifetime we invented a lot of words too Seinfeld was our teacher.

grinning

YADA YADA YADA

What begins as a shortcut over uninteresting information quickly becomes a yada yada over “the best part,” as Jerry puts it. 

FESTIVUS

George’s father’s alternative to Christmas involves the airing of grievances (or telling your family members how they’ve disappointed you over the year), feats of strength, and an aluminum pole (which you can find any time of year when you Google “Festivus”).

KAVORKA

Kramer is told he has kavorka, Latvian for “the lure of the animal," a power which draws women to him, to be "possessed by him."

laughing

In reply toRe: msg 6
Eliot (Elohimil)

From: Eliot (Elohimil)

20/1/20

Seinfeld is the master of new words!


REGIFTER: A label-maker Jerry gets from a friend looked familiar to Elaine because it’s the same one she gave Tim.

“He recycled this gift!” she cries. “He’s a regifter!”

https://youtu.be/c32W8Adtq6k

DOUBLE DIP
double-dipping a chip is perfectly fine.

Seinfeld - The Chip Dip
https://youtu.be/RfprRZQxWps

grinning

Eliot (Elohimil)

From: Eliot (Elohimil)

20/1/20

Mumpsimus - the act of sticking to old mistaken beliefs about language and customs simply out of habit

I've often heard Mumpsimus before

Lana (Redneckbab1)

From: Lana (Redneckbab1)

21/1/20

Master poets all have amazing and odd new words, just make sure the spell-checker gets it! grinning

In reply toRe: msg 6
Guard101

From: Guard101

22/1/20

These modern new words are right-on amusing!  laughing

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