Coalition of the Confused

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Confused malcontents swilling Chardonnay while awaiting the Zombie Apocalypse.

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The worst of "humanity"   World Wide WTF?

Started 2/20/19 by Jenifer (Zarknorph); 7832 views.
In reply toRe: msg 73
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
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In reply toRe: msg 74
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
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From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Mar-11

RGoss99

From: RGoss99

Mar-18

Could not happen to a better order. The Christian brothers specialize in education, but in California via their winery they are very rich, and with declining membership. So the payment should come easily. However I see a technical problema, in the organization of the Catholic curch. I don´t think Rome can be touched, because in most countries, the church is a separate corporation, so its assets in Australia are limited to those in Australia. Making it more complicated, the suit might not even go to the diocese in question, since the Christian brothers answer to a provincial in Australia, who answers to Rome, not the local bishops. I would be interested to hear how this ends.

This points up an organizational problema in the Catholic church because there are two chains of command which only meet at the papal level. The secular pope>primate>archbishop>bishop>rector>priest, and the regular pope>general>provincial>prior/president>priest>brother. We had a potential problema in my village. A teen that I considered rather "immature" decided he wanted to be a priest and applied to the local seminary. But this required the recommendation of the rector and the local bishop, both who said "no". But we have a church under the order of St Philip Neri (famous in the U.K. via Cardinal Neuman). They were basicly a teaching order, but declining vocations closed most of their schools, including one in my village. The order is small, but the prior (infact the only member of the order) is a local problema (For example in a village where "out of town is only a 5 minute walk", he has his own Palm Sunday procession, where before it went from the parish churh to his convent. When the "secular" establishment turned this kid down, through connections he got accepted via their convent in Barcelona. What we feared is if he was ordained he would come back and be our problema. The good news is that is social life in BCN got him expelled, but via his education, he is back in Mallorca as a high school history teacher on our south coast, and the nicest way I can put it, is that he hangs out with a rather strange mixed gender bunch in their 20s who might be classified as "goths" (hair died black, makeup, black clothing, tats, piercings.  The generation above him in my village is all dead, but lots of cousins, normal folk, who want nothing to do with him. Still he shows up at traditional festivals and hangs with the same kids he was with back in high school. I mention this as an RC organizational problema because. In most organizations, civil service, military, etc. the "no" woould have been absolute, but our province (archbishop) is in Valencia, a different chain of command then Barcelona, so there needs to be some sort of integrated data base. For example all state school teachers (not private unfortunately) require FBI clearance before they can enter a classroom. For private schools, this is only voluntary. So In Los Angeles, where the RC system is roughly 30% of the students, all their schools have the same requirement. But this is not the case in what Australians might call the California "Out Back". 

OT: Reading between the lines, regarding Trump´s high school education, I suspect that his high school would not have this requirement, as there seems to be some mystery about Trump´s "military" experience in the OTC program there. Because of law suits, educational institutions have code words which tell insiders what is really going on without getting caught in libel suits. This "code" system happened when the law was changed that parents and former students got the right to Access all of their school récords. Before that time, primary school teachers, for example, wrote an informal evaluation on each student every semester. When the law was changed teams of lawyers went through each file and blanked out potential problem vocabulary, and recommended "safe" descritions of problems, similar to our pastor referring to the rejected seminary candidate as "immature" which implied he was a loner, no Friends his own age, but hung out with a munch of younger kids his own age and gender (of course off the record they probably had written récords that were never seen). This guy has only been teaching 2 years as his first job, so I am curious as to how is "career" shapes up. When I first met him while he was in high school he was "head altar boy", when the pastor then died, the next pastor decided to give the job to a married adult female eucharistic minister, which is why he associated with the other church in the village.

Jenifer (Zarknorph)
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From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Mar-19

Unfortunately Australia has a lot of historical institutional abuse, and not all of it from religious orders.

I doubt we will see any news about it, however, as everything was Coronavirus today.

RGoss99

From: RGoss99

Mar-19

You bring up a related problem with the way governmental and media are mishandling the situation. This is because the problems we focused on before the virus have not gone away. For example the increased arms sales in the U.S. to people who have never owned fire arms in the past. Some where you mentioned your shopping frustrations. It is only a matter of time before some frustrated shopper shoots someone, as happened in the past when the Saudis caused a crisis at the gas stations. The gun problem in America Will not go away, those pro restriction will get stronger, as Will those who feel a need of a gun unrestricted, further dividing the population. Homelessness is a problem, so how do we quarantine the homeless when there is no home to put them in. I am wáter and power independent, but what happens if the quarantine and/or virus cuts into the labor forcé that keeps the infrastructure, already in trouble from functioning. You in Australia, and others elsewhere have a global climate change related to forest fires, so do we forget that while we focus on shopping.

BerrySteph

From: BerrySteph

Mar-20

RGoss99 said:

The gun problem in America Will not go away, those pro restriction will get stronger, as Will those who feel a need of a gun unrestricted, further dividing the population.

WHY THE CLUSTERING OF LIKE-MINDED AMERICA IS TEARING US APART

THE BIG SORT

http://www.thebigsort.com/book.php

THE BIG SORT (Houghton Mifflin, May 7, 2008) is the landmark story of how America came to be a country of swelling cultural division, economic separation, and political polarization.

Going far beyond the simplistic red state/blue state divide, journalist Bill Bishop (in collaboration with sociologist and statistician Robert Cushing) marshals original data and incisive reporting to show how Americans have sorted themselves geographically, economically, and politically into like-minded communities over the last three decades.

Homogeneity may be a perk of the unprecedented choice our society offers - but it also breeds economic inequality, cultural misunderstanding, political extremism, and legislative gridlock. This is the story of our times, and its reality poses a profound threat to democracy, but no one before now has seemed to notice, let alone been able to describe, its causes and consequences.

The nation we live in - our culture, economy, neighborhoods, and churches - has been sculpted by the Big Sort over the past thirty years:

•People with college degrees were relatively evenly spread across the nation's cities in 1970. Thirty years later, college graduates had congregated in particular cities, a phenomenon that decimated the economies in some places and caused other regions to flourish.

• The generation of ministers who built sprawling mega-churches in the new suburbs learned to attract their stadium-sized congregations through the "homogenous unit principle." The new churches were designed for cookie-cutter parishioners, what one church-growth proponent described as "people like us."

• In 1976, only about a quarter of America's voters lived in a county a presidential candidate won by a landslide margin. By 2004, it was nearly half.

• Businesses learned to target their marketing to like-minded "image tribes," a technique used by Republicans in the 2004 campaign.

Living in politically like-minded groups has had its consequences. People living in homogenous communities grow both more extreme and more certain in their beliefs. Locally, therefore, governments backed by large majorities are tackling every conceivable issue. Nationally, however, Congress has lost most of its moderate members and is mired in conflict.

LikeRobert Putnam's Bowling Alone, Richard Florida's The Rise of the Creative Class, and Thomas Frank's What's the Matter with Kansas?, THE BIG SORT explores the connection between cultural evolution, economic change, and the power of place. THE BIG SORT, however, is the first account that systematically ties cultural and economic evolution to the changing political landscape of America.

And when you have finished reading, the country - its conflicts and turmoil - makes a new kind of sense.

I'll not bother you with my analysis of this huge problem.

Nor my predictions of where it might lead.

Jenifer (Zarknorph)
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From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Mar-20

My mother's church contributes to a Food Bank for the poor and homeless.

But no one is putting anything in.

The old, the sick and the poor are in the greatest danger.

But, they always are I guess.

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Jenifer (Zarknorph)
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From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Mar-20

In reply toRe: msg 81
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
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From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Mar-30

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Jenifer (Zarknorph)
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From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Apr-20

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