Coalition of the Confused

Hosted by Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Confused malcontents swilling Chardonnay while awaiting the Zombie Apocalypse.

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A bit of Australian Culture   Australia and Oceania

Started 7/13/19 by Jenifer (Zarknorph); 12071 views.
ElDotardo

From: ElDotardo

12/4/19

No worries . . . just call your local 'gator whisperer . . .

Image result for alligator in swimming pool gif

Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

12/5/19

Neither fit into this thread!

I will tell you where to post.

katiek2

From: katiek2

12/5/19

See - and I bet you thought I was kidding.

ElDotardo

From: ElDotardo

12/5/19

I would never doubt you *chuckle*.

OTOH, I'll risk Jennifer's wrath by posting the following here - it's just too funny to pass up, and who doesn't need a good laugh these days as the Leftist loons meltdown all around us?

(Forgive me, Jen)

 

Image result for trump king of israel meme

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=24&v=NUQfCBdWOh4&feature=emb_logo

katiek2

From: katiek2

12/5/19

Thanks for the giggles!

BerrySteph

From: BerrySteph

12/8/19

Jenifer (Zarknorph) said:

Port Essington, the failed colony the British darkly called 'World's End' serves as a reminder 'we could get on without killing each other'.

So what was different here?

Is it because it was a marine base, not a settler base?

Unlike elsewhere in Australia, the settlement at Port Essington was not marked by widespread violence or massacres.

"The British settlement was small, and they weren't making incursions into Aboriginal territory," Professor McKenna says.

"So the whole encounter was much more peaceful."

Professor McKenna says British journals of the time reveal initial "repulsion and rejection" of traditional Aboriginal culture — which quickly turned into fascination and respect.

"The journals end up becoming full of detailed observations of Aboriginal cultural practices," he says.

"They are starting to perceive the intricacy, the knowledge, the craft, the skill of those Aboriginal people.

"That experience at close quarters caused them to start asking questions about their own culture and its alleged superiority.

"Because as they could see, Aboriginal people were living in this environment effortlessly, and they were learning from them how to live."

But Christophersen notes that this closeness also brought terrible disease to their country.

"Yes, we didn't have the frontier violence but we had the sickness, and it was just as devastating," he says.

By late 1844, the British marines had spent six years living in Port Essington.

In his letters to the Colonial Office, Commandant John MacArthur began dropping hints about moving the settlement somewhere better. https://www.abc.net.au/news/2019-12-03/port-essington-worlds-end-failed-british-colonial-settlement/11730570

Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

From: Jenifer (Zarknorph)

12/8/19

They also insisted on walking around in a top end Australian summer in full woollen military gear!

BerrySteph

From: BerrySteph

12/8/19

Jenifer (Zarknorph) said:

They also insisted on walking around in a top end Australian summer in full woollen military gear!

There's a Churchill book where he goes out to Egypt and sees at a distance troops frolicking on the beach and going into the sea.

He turns to his companion and says "how thoughtful of the army to have given them all white trunks to preserve their dignity".

He then mentions that the colonials had previously all been terrified of the sun - wearing pith helmets and puttees and back-pads (eh? wuzzat?).

Whereas modern man wasn't a bit afraid and didn't seem to suffer any ill effects. (We now know that's not entirely true!).

ElDotardo

From: ElDotardo

12/8/19

A parting shot . . . enjoy . . .

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