Coalition of the Confused

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Confused malcontents swilling Chardonnay while awaiting the Zombie Apocalypse.

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Cosmos   Science

Started 2/28/20 by PTG (anotherPTG); 3045 views.
In reply toRe: msg 26
NISSY (NISSY2)

From: NISSY (NISSY2)

10/29/21

Algebra was very easy for me. Geometry was OK but I never got into the proving theorems part. It seemed like a waste of time. Geometry is the trainer for trigonometry which is fundamental for engineers. I come from a family of engineers.

My love in high school was really meteorology which has been my hobby most of my life.

adwil

From: adwil

10/29/21

Meteorology is interesting, but was especially so in my younger day when I used to camp in the hills. When I was past camping, I'd always check the forecasts before I went hill walking so I didn't get surprised by heavy rain or snow. Half the battle of hill walking outside of the summer months is wearing and carrying the right gear. Oh, and knowing when to abandon the walk and retreat to the nearest warm pub.

In reply toRe: msg 28
NISSY (NISSY2)

From: NISSY (NISSY2)

10/29/21

I have always been fascinated with meteorology and I am a bit of a climate skeptic. The planet has a lot of built in protections for preventing it from overheating.

There was more sea ice in the Arctic ten years ago than there is now.

http://nsidc.org/arcticseaicenews/
adwil

From: adwil

10/29/21

I don't have any problem accepting that the climate is changing. Spring flowers are two or three weeks earlier and whilst heavy snowfalls still occur, they're much less frequent than  when I moved here in 1971.

In reply toRe: msg 30
NISSY (NISSY2)

From: NISSY (NISSY2)

10/29/21

We are on the same page. Water is a pretty peculiar molecule occupying more volume as a sold than as a liquid. How it freezes and melts effects the temperature in an illogical manner. So what seems logical isn't always what happens. Warmer temperatures can actually create more snow in the mountains.

Some countries like China are planting more trees to take carbon out of the atmosphere but more trees will cause more animals who will just put the carbon back into the atmosphere.

And the planet has ways of cooling itself by creating more clouds over oceans when the water temperature increases.

California just had a huge storm that is supposed to be evidence of climate change but the Columbus day storm of 1962 was just as severe.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Columbus_Day_Storm_of_1962

adwil

From: adwil

10/30/21

It's easy to accept that climatically, things are changing. When Carlisle was badly flooded in 2005, we  were told this was a 1 in 200 years event. It happened again in 2015. Lots of flood prevention schemes have been paid for to try and make sure it doesn't happen again. In the last couple of days, a foot of rain has fallen, the railway line between Carlisle and Glasgow has been closed because bridges have been washed away. No doubt, what used to be rare 200 year events will now happen every 5 or 10 years because our climate is changing.

In reply toRe: msg 32
NISSY (NISSY2)

From: NISSY (NISSY2)

10/30/21

It is kind of the same story with the Columbus Day storm of 1962 in Northern California. We were told that it was a 500 year storm but the storm that hit last week was just as bad and with a lower barometric pressure center, 945 mb.

Meanwhile, I look out my window and across the street is the cove of a fjord. I have been told that twenty years ago, the water came over the road in an intense storm. Our tides are more influenced by barometric pressure than the sun and moon. When I see mud instead of water, it means a very high barometer.

But the water may never come over the road again because we have isostatic rebound left over from the ice age and the land is slowly rising. It is rising two meters per century on the Finnish islands of Ahvenenmaa. It is quite complex.

adwil

From: adwil

10/30/21

NISSY (NISSY2) said:

"isostatic rebound"

That's what's happening to the UK. The southern part of the UK is sinking whilst the North is either stable or rising.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Post-glacial_rebound

In reply toRe: msg 34
NISSY (NISSY2)

From: NISSY (NISSY2)

10/30/21

Isostatic rebound is strong in Scandinavia and Northern Canada, especially Hudson Bay and as the land comes up, it pushes water away and it rises in other places like the Maldives. It does make you think. At least it is now possible to raise potatoes in Greenland. https://www.potatopro.com/greenland/potato-statistics
adwil

From: adwil

10/30/21

I thought Greenland could grow potatoes because it was getting warmer. ( Like it was in the Middle Ages when it was settled. ) 

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