Coalition of the Confused

Hosted by Jenifer (Zarknorph)

Confused malcontents swilling Chardonnay while awaiting the Zombie Apocalypse.

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Coronavirus   World Wide WTF?

Started Mar-31 by Jenifer (Zarknorph); 17850 views.
adwil

From: adwil

Jun-7

Di (amina046) said:

Highlighting some of the misinformation circulating on COVID-19

Good, sensible, scientifically correct advice,

Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host
adwil said:

Good, sensible, scientifically correct advice,

And yet... it does not resonate with those who are not sensible or have any interest in scientific evidence.

In reply toRe: msg 357
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

June 8th


adwil

From: adwil

Jun-8

"And yet... it does not resonate with those who are not sensible or have any interest in scientific evidence."

Isn't that always the case? 

I don't see a solution to that.

Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

June 9


In reply toRe: msg 360
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

Experts fear tear gas could spread virus

Tear gas floats in the air as a line of police move demonstrators away from St. John's Church across Lafayette Park.

Police departments have used tear gas and pepper spray on protesters in recent weeks, raising concern that the chemical agents could increase the spread of the coronavirus.

The chemicals are designed to irritate the mucous membranes of the eyes, nose and throat. They make people cough, sneeze and pull off their masks as they try to breathe.

Medical experts say those rushing to help people sprayed by tear gas could come into close contact with someone already infected with the virus who is coughing infectious particles. Also, those not already infected could be in more danger of getting sick because of irritation to their respiratory tracts.

There's no research on tear gas and COVID-19 specifically, because the virus is too new. But a few years ago, Joseph Hout, then an active duty Army officer, conducted a study of 6,723 Army recruits exposed to a riot control gas during basic training.

The study found a link between that exposure and doctors diagnosing acute respiratory illnesses.

In reply toRe: msg 361
Jenifer (Zarknorph)
Host

adwil

From: adwil

Jun-9

Jenifer (Zarknorph) said:

We need up to 15 billion COVID-19 vaccine doses to get the world moving and kickstart international travel again - but when it's released, there won't be enough to go around. Here's who's likely to get it first.

I think that's unduly pessimistic. Air travel is already expanding in Europe as is tourism. Whether that's entirely sensible before a working vaccine is made available is moot.

Astra-Zeneca's vaccine is in the latest stages of trials with 10,000 Brits involved. If the final results are positive, 100 million doses will be immediately available. Of course, there are other trials and other labs all over the world so once a vaccine is found, it will be produced quickly.

adwil

From: adwil

Jun-9

Jenifer (Zarknorph) said:

Police departments have used tear gas and pepper spray on protesters in recent weeks, raising concern that the chemical agents could increase the spread of the coronavirus.

If you riot or attack the police, they will defend themselves with the weapons at their disposal. Pepper spray and tear gas may increase coronavirus susceptibility, but so does a big demo and the riots that sometimes follow. I have zero sympathy for anyone who catches the virus because they've been ignoring the distancing rules.

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