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Military Guns and Ammunition

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This is intended for people interested in the subject of military guns and their ammunition, with emphasis on automatic weapons, particularly in larger calibres (12.7+mm).

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XM914   Army Guns 20+mm

Started 30-May by autogun; 1351 views.
autogun

From: autogun

30-May

The designation XM914 is being used in two different ways:

1. To refer to the M230LF: https://www.aviationtoday.com/2018/01/17/drones-downed-orbitals-armaments/

2. To refer to a Kongsberg RWS which mounts the M230LF: https://www.kongsberg.com/kda/news-and-media/news-archive/2017/kongsberg-leverages-existing-program-to-united-states-army/

Anyone know of a source which clarifies this?

 

poliorcetes

From: poliorcetes

30-May

I wonder what would be the relation between Vo and Pk > 66% for a given distance. A 120 kph drone travels 33 m in one second, and assuming a 5-7m of burst effective radius for AB munition, I would say that it would alter its trajectory in no more than such distance as a basic safety measure for it.

a 40mm HV grenade would offer a semisphere of 240m, possibly less in height. A 30x113 AB would offer a 700m semisphere... but then the problem is to detect a 40cm target flying almost NOE

I wonder if 700m is reallistic for detecting and offering firing solutions for that, even assuming a direct LOS 

taschoene

From: taschoene

30-May

I believe the canon is the XM914.  The modified CROWS is a remote weapon system that carries an XM914 cannon, which they are unhelpfully calling the "XM914 Remote Weapon Station" 

https://govtribe.com/opportunity/federal-contract-opportunity/xm914-remote-weapon-station-w15qkn18x01t1

Federal Contract Opportunity for XM914 Remote Weapon Station ..... The U.S. Army ... is seeking information from organizations that possess Remote Weapon Stations which integrate the XM914 30mm Automatic Cannon, M240 (family) machine gun, and additional armaments.

https://www.dacis.com/budget/budget_pdf/FY20/PROC/A/4368G13800_17.pdf

The XM914 autocannon is an upgraded and modified version of the M230 cannon currently equipped on the AH-64 Apache advanced attack helicopter. The XM914 modifies the aviation-based weapon for ground application and integration into a remote weapon station for vehicle platforms. 

autogun

From: autogun

31-May

Thanks - that's what I suspected. So the XM914 is just a relabelled M230LF.

 

  • Edited 31 May 2020 3:34  by  autogun
taschoene

From: taschoene

31-May

Well, I'd say that XM914 is the Army designation for the product known commercially as the M230LF.  The "LF" designation isn't really consistent with Army nomenclature. It is odd that they didn't just use "M230A2" (or whatever the correct suffix number might be).

RovingPedant

From: RovingPedant

31-May

taschoene said...

t is odd that they didn't just use "M230A2" (or whatever the correct suffix number might be).

Not so much, as the LF variant is somewhat different to the M230 rather than a modification with the same role. Kind of like the M4 not being an M16Anumber or the M3 .50 cal not being an M2Anumber

taschoene

From: taschoene

31-May

I'd say the M2 vs M3 are quite distinct mechanically; there are only a handful of common parts, IIRC. For M16 vs M4, isn't it that the two weapons are regarded as different categories (i.e., it's "Rifle, M16" versus "Carbine, M4").  Are aircraft autocannon and ground autocanon considered separate categories of weapons in Army nomenclature?  I'm hard-pressed to think of another cannon with both ground and air applications in the Army.

autogun

From: autogun

31-May

taschoene said...

I'm hard-pressed to think of another cannon with both ground and air applications in the Army.

Well, any US Army air application would presumably be limited to helicopters. Which limits us to the M230...

Of course, it is not uncommon for a multi-service gun to have several designations, e.g. the 30 x 173 Bushmaster II, which is the XM813 for the army, the MK 44 for the USN and the GAU-23/A when used in the USAF AC-130 gunships.

 

RovingPedant

From: RovingPedant

31-May

taschoene said...

I'd say the M2 vs M3 are quite distinct mechanically; there are only a handful of common parts, IIRC. For M16 vs M4, isn't it that the two weapons are regarded as different categories (i.e., it's "Rifle, M16" versus "Carbine, M4"). 

I don’t know off hand how much the M230 and the LF have in common, but the have a different rate of fire, different feed, different barrel and different recoil. They aren’t interchangeable. The ‘different category’ reason probably holds at least as true for the chainguns as it does for the Armalite derivatives.

taschoene

From: taschoene

31-May

I guess I hadn't realized how completely reworked the LF is.  No argument from me then.

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