autogun

Military Guns and Ammunition

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This is intended for people interested in the subject of military guns and their ammunition, with emphasis on automatic weapons, particularly in larger calibres (12.7+mm).

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Winning the calibre war...   Ammunition <20mm

Started 11-Jun by autogun; 755 views.
autogun

From: autogun

11-Jun

Among guns which saw military action, my money's on this one - a shell for the German 80 cm Gustav railway gun of WW2. Photo taken a couple of decades ago at the Imperial War Museum in London. I don't think it's on display any more - possibly somebody nicked it evilGrin

There were two different shells, both looking the same thanks to ballistic caps. One was a nose-fuzed HE shell weighing 4,800 kg (10,584 lb) and containing 400 kg (882 lb) of HE, the other was a base-fuzed AP concrete breaker weighing 7,100 kg (15,656 lb) which contained 200 kg (441 lb) of HE.

The propellant charge for the HE shell weighed 2,240 kg (4,939 lb), while the anti-concrete shell was pushed up the barrel by 2,100 kg (4,631 lb) propellant. The HE shell was fired at an MV of 820 m/s to a maximum range of 47,000 m (29.2 miles) while the heavy one exited at 710 m/s (2,330 fps) and reached 38,000 m (23.61 miles).

Weight in action was about 1,350 tons and it took a force of 1,420 men about three weeks to assemble it on site. The rate of fire left a little to be desired - the highest daily count I've seen being 16 rounds.

Work on the design started in around 1936 and it was intended to break the Maginot Line, but it was too late for that. It was actually used in action in the siege of Sevastopol, firing an uncertain number of shells (reports say between 36 and 55), then apart from a brief reported appearance at Warsaw in 1944, it vanished.  

 

  • Edited 14 June 2020 3:00  by  autogun
zragon13

From: zragon13

11-Jun

These guns--and their "smaller" 600mm mortar cousins-- make a virtual appearence in Episode 3 (starting 28:30) of the excellent Russian (English dubbed) documentary miniseries about the WW2 Eastern front Soviet Storm that I just finished watching on YouTube.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jZCKFZsDAuk&list=PLwGzY25TNHPC_SsXFcIH-ba0nWuNbHOM6&index=3

 

Despite reading and learning about WW2 since I was a boy, I never realized how little I knew about the Soviet side of the war. I found the whole series quite informative and entertaining and recommend it. 

  • Edited 11 June 2020 14:40  by  zragon13
Jeff (Jefffar)

From: Jeff (Jefffar)

11-Jun

Tony, I see you the 80cm Gustav and raise you the 940mm Little David.  It did not see combat use however.   https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Little_David

 

 

 

autogun

From: autogun

12-Jun

Jeff (Jefffar) said...

Tony, I see you the 80cm Gustav and raise you the 940mm Little David.  It did not see combat use however.

Yep, that's the reason I said "guns which saw military action" wink

 

 

nincomp

From: nincomp

12-Jun

autogun said...

Photo taken a couple of decades ago at the Imperial War Museum in London. I don't think it's on display any more - possibly somebody nicked it evilGrin

One security guard to another: "See that visitor pushing a baby carriage?  Does that carriage look unusually large to you?"

renatohm

From: renatohm

13-Jun

Awesome post. Just a minor quibble:

"Weight in action was about 1,350 kg"

Guess you meant 1,350,000 kg / 1,350 metric tons (2,976 million lbs / 1,328 long tons / 1,488 short tons), right?

autogun

From: autogun

14-Jun

Well spotted - I've altered my post.

 

renatohm

From: renatohm

14-Jun

I've had my share of those too...

hobbes154

From: hobbes154

24-Jun

I was going to be a smartarse as well but looks like the Tsar Cannon and Mallet's Mortar were also not used in combat.

The Pumhart von Steyr looks like the only alternative candidate.

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