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This is intended for people interested in the subject of military guns and their ammunition, with emphasis on automatic weapons, particularly in larger calibres (12.7+mm).

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Bazookas, M72 LAW etc against infantry   General Military Discussion

Started 17-Aug by 17thfabn; 393 views.
17thfabn

From: 17thfabn

17-Aug

The early U.S. bazooka and M72 LAW by and large only had shaped charge warheads. These of course are optimized for use against armored targets such tanks and APC. The U.S. World War II era bazooka was supposed to have high explosive and white phosphorus war heads but it appears these were little issued.

These and other types of light anti-tank rockets are often used against other types of targets.

Using a shaped charge warhead against a bunker, house, pillbox etc. is not an issue.

If you are using an anti-tank rocket against other types of targets there are some issues.

For instance against infantry in a tree line or in the open. Because of the way the shaped charge works the blast is focused. 

In these instances would it be better for the rocket to impact at some distance in front of the enemy, and thus kick up debris towards the opposition? 

stancrist

From: stancrist

17-Aug

I doubt that debris would be very lethal.  If the intent is to kill or incapacitate, better to aim at the target.

That being said, these small HEAT warheads may have relatively low hit probability from fragmentation.

Friend of mine fired a M72 LAW at a NVA soldier, who was hit and killed by just one single tiny fragment.

RovingPedant

From: RovingPedant

17-Aug

17thfabn said...

If you are using an anti-tank rocket against other types of targets there are some issues.

For instance against infantry in a tree line or in the open. Because of the way the shaped charge works the blast is focused. 

 

 

In these instances would it be better for the rocket to impact at some distance in front of the enemy, and thus kick up debris towards the opposition? 

The British Army documentary on the Falkland conflict makes repeated mention of the use of 66mm LAW (M72) being decisive in firefights amongst the mountain peaks.

While shaped charges do have a focussed effect, it’s not like there isn’t a blast effect in other directions. Other things being equal, a shaped charge will have less explosive than a normal HE warhead of similar volume, because of the liner and the hollow cavity, but it’s still a grenade-sized explosive. On a warhead optimised for anti-tank, there will be less fragmentation than one optimised for fragmentation, but it will still cause some.

Farmplinker

From: Farmplinker

18-Aug

Falling trees tend to cause a scattering effect. Seriously, an explosion in your line tends to cause the troops to want to fall back.

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