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This is intended for people interested in the subject of military guns and their ammunition, with emphasis on automatic weapons.

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New SKS sabot round (762x39)   General Military Discussion

Started 31-Oct by smg762; 600 views.
smg762

From: smg762

31-Oct

Some small company has a new AK loading with saboted .22 in a 762x39 case.

Interestingly they appear to be vastly more accurate than normal saboted .22s, due to the sabot having 'petals' which fall away from the sides. 

This is in contrast to most other sabots (rem. Accellerators and CBJ rounds) where the sabot remains in one piece

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=pDfMf31jsn4&t=235s

In reply toRe: msg 1
roguetechie

From: roguetechie

31-Oct

That's incredibly interesting stuff right there!

In reply toRe: msg 1
nincomp

From: nincomp

7-Nov

smg762 said:

The drawback is that the sabot sides separate....sending the peices flying at angles which is bad when prone shooting He even had to cover the chrony with wood in a different video....to protect it Still, its puzzling why his petal sabots should be more accurate than normal sabots

Yes, discarded sabots flying downrange have always been a problem.  They may still be a danger to current troops wearing full combat protection.   We only have the word of the fellow in the video that he has managed to come up with a much more accurate design.  His loaded ammo looks pretty much like the typical 7.62-to-5.56 sabot load, since the most widely available sabots have "petals" that extend beyond the case.  E. Arthur Brown Company (EABCO) has been selling this sabot, for example, for over 20 years:

Sweden once had a saboted sniper round that was sufficiently accurate for them.   IIRC, it was made by Winchester with a 4.81mm tungsten penetrator. 

7,62 mm Sk Ptr 10 PRICK

The only reason why discarded sabots are not considered a major issue with tanks is that in general, it is a very bad idea to be in front of a tank gun anyway.  

  • Edited 07 November 2021 9:36  by  nincomp
roguetechie

From: roguetechie

7-Nov

Yeah I'm not seeing a whole lot of visible difference between his "bushing sabot" and normal.

It's one of those things to keep an eye on but I'm not going to get excited yet.

It's sorta like cbjtech In that, their sabots could be awesome too we don't really know and he won't kick any loose to let people test his stuff so it's still a question mark almost 2 decades after first coming around 

One thing you unfortunately only learn with time about the gun world is that this miracle stuff that could change everything if it actually works tends to not get across the line.

It stays a maddening question mark and then eventually fades away to a trivia piece old hands wow the new guys with.

It's frustrating but it's how it is and probably how it's going to stay unless something changes.

A lot of this is because there's still people who think they're going to make a small fortune out of gun innovations and the only way to do that is to start with a large fortune which your involvement with the industry turns into a small one.

Guys like reed knight and etc actually prove this. He turned a large fortune into a smaller one but he now has a monopoly on way too much cool shit.

nincomp

From: nincomp

7-Nov

Emeric, 

I was rereading your "Towards a “600 m” lightweight General Purpose Cartridge" paper.  It is difficult to tell from the photo, but does the sabot for the PUC300 cartridge conform to the shape of the brass bullet.  If so, how was it loaded?

  • Edited 07 November 2021 22:39  by  nincomp
EmericD

From: EmericD

8-Nov

nincomp said:

I was rereading your "Towards a “600 m” lightweight General Purpose Cartridge" paper.  It is difficult to tell from the photo, but does the sabot for the PUC300 cartridge conform to the shape of the brass bullet.  If so, how was it loaded?

The sabot is a 2-parts, "half cup" design.

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