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Spike SR ATGM   General Military Discussion

Started 28-Sep by gatnerd; 1139 views.
taschoene

From: taschoene

28-Sep

Very reminiscent of the Predator Short-Range Assault Weapon that the USMC bought in limited numbers (a few hundred) around 2004.  

My one concern about using a missile seeker as the FCU is that seekers tend to have very narrow FoVs, while the Javelin FCU (for example) is quite useful as a surveillance sensor even without a missile.  

Farmplinker

From: Farmplinker

28-Sep

How resistant to counter-measures is it?

RovingPedant

From: RovingPedant

28-Sep

taschoene said...

My one concern about using a missile seeker as the FCU is that seekers tend to have very narrow FoVs, while the Javelin FCU (for example) is quite useful as a surveillance sensor even without a missile.  

Possibly remedied by the improved resolution of relatively cheap sensors and a reduced range. The Javelin has a 64x64 sensor and a 2.5km range, so if you want to resolve anything at that distance you’ll need a narrow field of view. Modern “cheap” sensors are 300 to 600 elements square so would give up to ten times the field of view for a given range. The shorter range would give you an increase in field of view in proportion to the range. The Spike SR could have a further 60% wider FoV compared to Javelin.

RovingPedant

From: RovingPedant

28-Sep

Farmplinker said...

How resistant to counter-measures is it?

As an passive imaging fire and forget weapon, the only countermeasures would be hard, dazzle, obscuration or modification of your signature.

In reply toRe: msg 1
Refleks

From: Refleks

28-Sep

That’s how maverick works (the non laser version anyway).

We are quickly reaching a point in electronics where there’s no reason you couldn’t turn anything LAW sized and up into a fire and forget weapon for less than $6,000, including reseller markup. What lags is not the technology so much, but expectations — things cost such and such because they always have, and if the manufacturers can incorporate measures to make it less expensive on their end then great! Additional margins. But it doesn’t get passed onto the customer (govt) save for whatever is necessary to ensure the bid is won.

roguetechie

From: roguetechie

29-Sep

Luckily for us both the javelin missiles themselves and the fcu are somewhere in the process of an upgrade that will drop the cost and weight of the fcu while making it capable of much longer observation and resolution range.

The javelin is still going to be better than this in some key ways, but at $75k a pop you can get two of these spikes for the price of one pike!

I know which of those two I'd rather have

RovingPedant

From: RovingPedant

29-Sep

 

Refleks said...

We are quickly reaching a point in electronics where there’s no reason you couldn’t turn anything LAW sized and up into a fire and forget weapon for less than $6,000, including reseller markup.

Well, yes, but actually no.

At least if you want a weapon that is safe and reliable in all weathers and conditions.

You could make a system that works* for a low price but it would be a cheap system. You wouldn’t necessarily know what capabilities** you weren’t getting either.

* for a given value of “works”

** things like “functions in the rain”, “doesn’t accidentally go off when you are using your radio” or “doesn’t loop back onto operator”

In reply toRe: msg 9
gatnerd

From: gatnerd

29-Sep

I don't know much about realistic costs, but it does seem like a fair amount of work is going into lowering costs for sensors.

This method by DARPA looks like its trying to create a 'standardized' seeker that could be used across multiple platforms, increasing economy of scale and lowering costs.

https://www.baesystems.com/en/article/darpa-selects-bae-systems-for-optical-seeker-on-precision-munitions

BAE Systems tested the seeker during the first phase of DARPA’s Seeker Cost Transformation (SECTR) program. The SECTR seeker integrates with a wide range of weapon platforms that use munitions and can operate in day or night. It enables autonomous precision guidance via passive electro-optical and infrared sensors in environments where GPS navigation is unavailable or unreliable.

“Low-cost, precision munitions are critical to our customers, which is why we’ve developed a flexible seeker that radically lowers the cost typically associated with precision guidance,” said Mark Meisner, a chief scientist at BAE Systems. “The SECTR program is allowing us to deliver advanced sensing and navigation capabilities for munitions to warfighters faster.”

The seeker’s open architecture enables highly accurate, competitive, low-cost munitions to be capable of navigating and locating targets in limited-access and denied environments. It provides these munitions with quick-reaction capabilities while meeting stringent cost, size, weight, and power requirements. The open architecture also enables rapid seeker integration into current and new weapon systems.

gatnerd

From: gatnerd

29-Sep

"The javelin is still going to be better than this in some key ways, but at $75k a pop you can get two of these spikes for the price of one pike!"

Yes, the Javelin seems like the better dedicated Anti Tank system due to the further range and top attack profile.

But the low cost, low weight, and self contained nature of the Spike SR makes it a more versatile GPMM - General Purpose Mayhem Munition - for infantry.

Not ideal for modern tanks (although could defeat APS with salvo fire), but perfect for attacking IFV's/Lesser vehicles, anti-structure, long range anti personnel, and general destruction. 

Seems like it would be the perfect 'resistance weapon' for somewhere like Taiwan or Cyprus that has a credible need of repelling / bleeding a superior invasion force. 

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