German Shepherd Dog Forum

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Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

Feb-7

I can't testify as to the veracity of this post but I copied and pasted it from a Dutch Shepherd owner who posted this in another forum. They did not post a link but nobody questioned the quotes integrity so I assume it to be true.

""I often get asked about how my dogs are in everyday life, etc. So finally I have some time to write on this. All of my competition dogs past and present are allowed and encouraged to play with other dogs, play with other people, live in the house, lay on sofas etc, get food from other people , go to dog beach, and basically live all around a VERY social live. Training ( and the people that know me can testify on this) is not on a daily basis, sometimes weeks can go by without "training". In fact actual training happens whenever I feel like it, and most importantly whenever I have time. I don't necessarily recommend this, but I have found that it works just fine for me. I can train a full hour ( and sometimes more) of obedience assuming weather conditions are good and the dog ENJOYS it and wants to keep going. Sometime I think I should make a video of it ... But then who would want to watch an hour of it. Sometimes ( or most of the time) it is very repetitive and silly. For obedience I pretty much never use food/treats even with the puppies. They always get their full meal in their dish. Including the night before tracking lesson. There is zero food deprivation, my dogs don't "work" for food. They like to play with me and I like playing them. I hope I covered most of the questions I get asked in private messages about this"

In reply toRe: msg 1
Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

Feb-7

"When you are clear in your training and raise a dog keeping in mind you need to control behavior as well as emotional states you can take spun up high level competition dogs and get them to chill out with you when not in the sport context. You can also let them play around other dogs and not worry about a dog becoming "doggy" or ignoring you for distractions like wanting to play with other dogs."

Eugene Bailiff 

In reply toRe: msg 2
Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

Feb-7

I think this was a great quote by someone that competes on a local level without higher aspirations:

"I think many handlers try to be over managing and don't let their dogs be a dog! It can cause the dog to have some anxious tendencies or act defensively out of fear of their partner."  Jane

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Feb-8

He sounds like Stonnie. Training is fun and engaging, not work.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Feb-8

He appeared again.  I haven’t seen anything from him in a few years.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Feb-8

That is because of the attitudes out there about training. Everyone is an expert but most don’t understand basic dog behavior.

Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

Feb-8

Balabanov actually does everything with his dogs that I do with mine except I train young puppies with treats. I would like to know what he does instead.

What I found most interesting was that he encourages his dogs to play with other dogs and he is a high level competitor.  The other thing that surprised me is that everything he does is the exact opposite of what is always recommended. 

Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

Feb-8

The post is older but I thought noteworthy.  He says he finds that playing with other dogs does not make a dog "doggie". I have found the same thing. I find letting them play with other dogs removes the excitement and distraction. 

Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

Feb-8

I never associated a lack of autonomy with making a dog anxious or even fearful of its owner. Then again, my dogs have plenty of time to be just dogs. I never micromanage them so I would not have opportunity to see this. 

Kazell

From: Kazell

Feb-8

I’m not a huge fan of training with treats. I haven’t really liked the mindset my dogs are working in when I have treats. So for me I just make it fun, praise etc. 

Then I guess I just expect it of them to listen once they know the commands. Treats I usually just give them to them when I feel like giving them a treat. 
 

I’ve been playing around with trying treats a little bit but for the most part I don’t. 

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