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Ivan Balabanov    Behavior and Training

Started 2/7/20 by Solitaire13; 1458 views.
Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

2/10/20

The cats that tend to be nightmares when introduced into multicat households are generally the cats raised without other cats or that are declawed. 

I have a lot of questions on this Sibling Rivalry Syndrome.  I have found just about everything said about it is false, at least what is published. If anything, I have found the exact opposite to be true. I think there needs to be a whole lot more research done on that topic. 

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

2/10/20

I don’t understand the new Leerburg method very well so I can’t comment.  Maybe competition Mals are different than pet or sport GSDs.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

2/10/20

Bored dogs get into mischief.  I have friends who I’ve known a long time who always get labs or Goldens. They have a swimming pool. Their dogs get no training, socialization or much of anything outside their own homes.  They do bring in other dogs to play, but the people aren’t very active, so other than throwing parties, they don’t do anything in the way of social activities for dogs.  Their dogs are exceptionally friendly to people and other dogs.  They have always gotten along well with mine, or they did.  The couple are much older than I am, in poor health now so we don’t interact like we used to.  But their dogs are outside all the time, and they have a big property.  More important, their dogs swim for hours every day on their own and never get bored.  The owners often get two puppies at the same time to grow up together and it always works out.  Usually two males, always neutered by 6 months.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

2/10/20

Maybe it’s the owners and not the siblings that are the problem.  They expect or they allow their dogs to be more important to each other than they are to their dogs.  It’s a very different thing to get siblings so they can entertain each other. That tells me the owner isn’t planning to do much with them.

Kazell

From: Kazell

2/10/20

I’m not talking about cats being nightmares, just cats that don’t care for the company of other cats. They can co-exist but they’ll never like each other. 
It doesn’t help if one is a brat that likes to mess with the others which I have seen on several occasions. 

And I’ve personally experienced plenty of stuff that corroborates issues with siblings/littermate syndrome. There isn’t just issues with fighting, you can have unhealthy bonding as well such as severe separation anxiety. There is certainly an owner aspect to it but the fact of the matter is it can happen a lot in average pet homes. And not every dog will have issues, saying that you know dogs that haven’t had problems doesn’t provide firm evidence just like me seeing a couple sets of dogs that have had problems doesn’t prove it. I’ve also seen bonding issues in dogs new to households, which again part of this is a training thing. But the average joe who doesn’t even teach their dog to sit probably isn’t going to know what to do to prevent it. 
 

Many people can barely handle one dog or rising to the challenge of handling two so it does make sense that more issues could be seen in those regards. 


 

Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

2/10/20

That's why I said it is an area where there needs to be a lot more research. 

I don't believe it has anything to do with training unless the training itself has had a negative impact by creating  it much as a leash creates reactivity. 

I agree that many people can't handle one dog but IMO, the solution is for many of those people to get a second dog to make their lives easier and to resolve issues with a second dog.

In reply toRe: msg 36
Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

2/14/20

"Very often, however, during play-fighting an actual fight breaks out. Perhaps one bit the other too hard and the other retaliates defensively. The offender may then learn to bite more gently. Pups develop a “soft” mouth between the third and fourth months of life, but if hand-raised in complete isolation from other pups, they do not acquire this inhibition."

Michael W. Fox, veterinarian and ethologist 

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

2/15/20

I’ve seen that with my older and younger dogs, too. Not just same age dogs.

Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

2/16/20

"Several years ago a friend of mine, Dr. Norman Bleicher, was working as a student assistant in a research laboratory where in one experiment pups had to be weaned early and housed in separate cages. They had no chance to play with each other and were simply cleaned and fed by the caretaker. But they didn’t thrive well and many died, death often being attributed to some bacteria that caused pneumonia or enteritis. He was reminded of the work of Dr. René Spitz, who in the early forties described a wasting disease (marasmus) in orphanage infants; this was eliminated and the incidence of disease was reduced while growth rates were increased simply by instructing personnel to fondle and play with the babies. The response was miraculous, and the babies were socially and emotionally far better adjusted when they grew up! Dr. Bleicher instigated a similar regime, giving each pup plenty of human handling and play, play objects in the pen, and an opportunity to play with other pups. The change was just as dramatic as in Spitz’s orphanage infants! Puppies, like children, need love and attention and an opportunity to play and interact—otherwise they may die or grow up as socially maladjusted cripples."

Michael W. Fox

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

2/16/20

The little puppy babies needed touching and love.

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