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Denver's Mayor Hancock's speech on why he vetoed city council's vote to repeal B   Controversies, Catastrophes and Teaky Moments (Enter at your own risk)

Started Feb-15 by Solitaire13; 314 views.
Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

Feb-15

This was a pivotal action that much of the country was watching.  Would Denver's Mayor Hancock veto the city council's vote to repeal Denver's breed ban and replace it with a more relaxed form of BSL?  

Veto it he did. One of his deciding factors was that he remembered Denver before Pit Bulls were banned and he knows Denver with a thirty year ban in place. He stated that nobody that was around back pre BSL would disagree that the ban needs to remain in place. 

The Mayor had five days after council's vote to consider a veto. During those five days, two high profile Pit Bull attacks would occur to influence his decision.  One was a 5 year old child who was mauled to death by the family pet Pit Bull of 12 years that never showed a sign of aggression.  The other was a 10 year old child also attacked by the family pet Pit Bull that several adult family members could not stop or remove from mauling the child. That Pit Bull had to be shot three times by a family member in order to remove its grip on the child.

With that said, I am posting a video of Mayor Hancock, (a dog lover by the way), explaining his veto and subsequently fielding questions from the press.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Feb-15

What pit lovers ignore or intentionally don’t want to know is that maybe their pet pit will never bite anyone. Let’s hope not. But when a dog turns and attacks it tries to kill. For whatever reason, it can’t help itself. It doesn’t recognize a family member because it’s in the zone.  I also think until a person has seen a dog try to kill, they have no idea what they are capable of.

A woman I know lost her husband and now has to take his dog everywhere.  The dog is extremely calm, not in a fawning way but has no drive. It sit where she puts it.  She tells everyone it’s a pit, with a little Shepherd and a little lab.  So I was surprised when I finally met the dog, that my first reaction was pit mix, but when I actually looked, the dog is a lab.  It’s probably at least half lab, maybe 3/4.  I don’t see GSD at all, not in shape, color, coat or temperament.  I barely see pit. Maybe a tiny bit in the face shape.  The reason her dog worries me is not because it’s part pit, but because she tells everyone it’s a pit so they think, Oh, pit mixes are so calm and pleasant. Actually, what she has temperament wise and everything else, is a lab.  The reason she takes him everywhere, is that calm as he is, if she leaves him alone in the yard, he jumps the fence and runs off.  

Kazell

From: Kazell

Feb-15

People don’t want to acknowledge that they aren’t the best family pet. Many put types are an intense dog and you can’t from a first glance tell a difference between dogs actually bred to be family companions vs. dogs either bred to fight or those traits not working to be bred out of them. 
 

Too many people get these type of dogs and refuse to acknowledge any warning signs or how much of a dog they can be. They’re good dogs for the right home, but that home is not the average pet owner. It would take quite some time to get good solid pets and in the meantime you can’t tell the difference between the dogs(besides those freaky dogs they’re staring to breed. No clue the temperament on them). Or the average person or those not extremely well versed in the bully/pitty type dogs. 
 

In reply toRe: msg 3
DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Feb-15

Your experience is very different from mine.  I don’t know of any that were bred to be good family pets.  Some have ended up that way but it’s very rare. Most are ticking time bombs, and their unsuspecting families have no idea until it’s too late.  We had a family tragedy where my sister lost a dog due to another family’s “sweet pet.” Even after their dog nearly killed the other one, the owners refused to accept it and kept the dog to do the same thing to someone else.  I just hope that people who have those pet dogs don’t ever see the other side of the breed in their own dogs.

Kazell

From: Kazell

Feb-15

I’ve heard of a few breeders actually working on it, can’t say for how successful it is. The problem is the far far far majority are byb dogs and well, all bets are off once you go there. I know of one person who wanted advice on how to train her 9 month old dog to not be aggressive but not spaying because she planned to breed her...

There are definitely a lot of dog aggression issues in the pitty type dogs, where most are just some sort of byb bred pit type dog. And since they aren’t probably clear headed you can get a ton of redirection which is just well not good. And results in unpredictable dogs.
 

I personally think they should not be a popular dog breed to own and I hate the whole it’s all in how you raise them mentality the pit owners parrot while they refuse to see issues like your family members dog killing another. If people want a happy gummy dog get a lab. The only reason breed bans bother me is I know GSDs and many other breeds are right behind them on that list. 
 

Also unfortunately pitty type dogs are just starting to pick up popularity here. Already seeing issues with people breeding them to everything like the doodle craze. Used to be we mainly had purebred or herding mutts in shelters or Heinz 57 mutts. Starting to get a lot more pit types. 

  • Edited February 15, 2020 7:48 pm  by  Kazell
In reply toRe: msg 5
Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

Feb-15

Actually, breed bans have been around for over a 100 years, always targeting Pit type dogs and it is exceedingly rare for other breeds to be in the crosshairs.

Most of the "it will be your breed next" is Pit Bull propaganda scare tactics used to create resistance to breed bans. 

Kazell

From: Kazell

Feb-15

Except right now you can barely get housing or insurance with many breeds besides bully types. Some places just ban a breed to live in the area once they have trouble with that breed. So one person sharing your breed and being a bad owner can mess things up for you. 
 

I can’t responsibly get a german shepherd until I own my own home because renting with them is dang near impossible. We’re just lucky the fear of them is equally balanced by them having a reputation as protector family dogs. 

In reply toRe: msg 7
Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

Feb-15

Insurance and housing restrictions have absolutely nothing to do with breed bans or BSL. 

In reply toRe: msg 7
DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Feb-16

Dog bans are common in rentals. Larger dogs make larger messes.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Feb-16

I agree, there is so much propaganda.

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