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So you think it is all about health testing....   Controversies, Catastrophes and Teaky Moments (Enter at your own risk)

Started Sep-16 by Solitaire13; 451 views.
DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Sep-17

Very informative. Does DNA testing find all known mutations? I wasn’t clear from reading the article. How many breeders even get past the first stage?

Rather than breeding a female with known mutations, wouldn’t it be best to find a dam that is clear of all possible defects? Then the number of possible sires increases.

Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

Sep-17

I think the point was that there simply is no test that covers all possible diseases so DNA health testing isn't of all that much value. I believe that they are saying the degree of inbreeding and linebreeding is a better indicator of health,  or lack thereof, than DNA testing.  

On the other hand,  one would think that a total outcross can bring a myriad of unforeseen recessives to the surface. 

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Sep-17

It could, unless one was familiar with all the dogs involved.  Breeders ignore linebreeding faults or we would not see dogs with dozens of offspring having the same medical conditions.

Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

Sep-17

Not really,  it's about the luck of the draw. There is no way that a breeder can predict which genes a puppy will inherit from each parent. 

Kazell

From: Kazell

Sep-17

DNA testing for specific single gene disorders is extremely helpful. As long as people don’t throw the baby out with the bath water. 
 

Pedigrees are useful for tracking, I wish they used breeding values and such in dogs. Linebreeding has its issues and benefits. I’m seeing issues with COIs. A dog with a 0-3% 10 gen pedigree COI should not be testing 20% COI

In reply toRe: msg 6
Solitaire13

From: Solitaire13

Sep-17

This study, the way I read it, states that COI is more critical than DNA for health. 

Neither take conformation or temperament into consideration. 

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Sep-17

So are you saying testing isn’t as important as we think it is? Instead, breeders should know their lines well and what’s the combinations will throw?

In reply toRe: msg 6
DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Sep-17

I take away the importance of COI, yet most breeders probably don’t even understand that.

Kazell

From: Kazell

Sep-17

It’s the reason I want to encourage outcrossing lines, why I think linebreeding is used too often. (Recreating specific animals vs. breeding for specific traits is an issue) and why some dog breeds need to open their studbooks.

Dog breeding needs to be big picture breeding. So conformation and temperament should play its role in selecting a stud along with COI and DNA testing.

The way I read the article was use DNA testing but it isn’t enough to just test for known disorders. 

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