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Mistakes new owners make when getting a dog   Everything Else German Shepherd

Started Sep-5 by DW (GSDogwalker); 817 views.
DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Sep-5

1. Not researching the breed carefully.

2. Not researching breeders or rescue groups thoroughly

3. Not knowing the type of dog, breed or temperament that suits them best.

4. Using the internet to train a dog when they don't understand the basics of dog behavior or training,

5. Getting a second or third or more dog that doesn't fit with the one(s) they already have, primarily when taking an older dog.  It is more difficult to know if a puppy will fit into a current mix.

6. Not making a lifetime commitment to the dog,

7. Not understanding the exercise, nutritional or health needs of their breed.

8. Thinking a dog is a dog and all are similar.

What did I leave out?

AislinnDeb

From: AislinnDeb

Sep-5

Not spending time bonding with the puppy.

Too much training and not enough fun for the puppy.

Not doing any training and then wondering why the puppy is out of control and difficult to live with.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Sep-5

Yes! There is a balance to training. They need to start the right things early and then build, while keeping it fun.  They also need to know what they are doing so they don't reinforce bad behaviors by mistake,

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Sep-5

Do you think early mouthing keeps people from bonding with German Shepherd puppies, who can be exceptionally nippy?

AislinnDeb

From: AislinnDeb

Sep-6

Possibly for some, but those are generally the same people who would do the same with other breeds. A lot of breeds are very nippy. Many are surprised that the nickname for Goldens as puppies is also landsharks. They can be very nippy as well and aren't gentle as pups.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Sep-6

I didn't know that.  I've met all the Goldens and yellow labs my friend raises and none were at all nippy. Maybe they are specially bred not to be.  I also knew some Dauschunds and was surprised to find that they are one of the top pet breeds for face bites of children among small dogs.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Sep-6

Compiled from several articles, I found that the top three breeds most likely to bite their owners are Dauschunds, Chihuahuas and Jack Russels.  They are also less likely to be reported.  1 out of 5 Doxies have bitten an owner or family member vs some of the breeds know as aggressive that bite more strangers and make the news more often, and also do more damage.

If you also consider that many small family dogs are probably house dogs, who are mostly in contact with family members, why would anyone get a breed likely to bite a child?  I would guess a lot of those bites are from being grabbed or carried by children.  

Kazell

From: Kazell

Sep-6

I bet you a lot of those bites aren't just because the child was carrying them or being rough. Little dogs aren't held to the same standards as big dogs. From what I've seen VERY little regard at all is given to the temperament or behavior of small dogs. They tend to get very little training and are horribly babied. Constant bites that would get a bigger dog put down are played off on small dogs. Thing like "Oh! They have little dog syndrome. Isn't it cute how ferocious they think they are?" Added to the fact both Jack Russels and Dachshund are or were high drive and energy working dogs. I'd never purposely try to get either of those breeds as I have only met aggressive dachshunds or high strung nervous wrecks of jack russels. I'm sure there are plenty of good dogs in both breeds but I've not met them.

Our neighbor has and occasionally breeds their dachshunds. The grandmother is slightly standoffish and will bark from her yard. The daughter of that one will run out of her yard to attack people, they now keep her tied up when she's outside. If she was a bigger dog I have no doubt she would have seriously injured or killed somebody as is she has left full out puncture marks, bleeding and bruising. . When our other neighbor's daughter got bit they just told her, "Don't worry you aren't the first person she's bit." I know many such cases like that with other small dogs. They don't get reported and thus are allowed to continue on like that. Whereas big dogs are dangerous due to their size and so tend to get reported when they bite somebody that isn't a family member or friend. Bad breeding, no training,  irresponsible owners, and not treating little dogs like dogs but babies.

In reply toRe: msg 8
DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Sep-6

I saw a Doxie bite a child in the face at a park.  It was the boy's grandmothers dog, and Grandma shouted at the boy.  I was horrified, and rushed over with a sterile wipe to give her to clean his face and told her I had a first aid kit in my car. It was a long, jagged cut, not deep enough for stitches obviously bleeding and right under his eye. She waved me off and was quite upset with me for commenting.  It was before I had a cell phone, so I had to go inside to alert the Recs and Parks director there was a medical emergency and when I came back out, they were gone.  That was the only aggressive one I have seen.

Yes, many people don't train or even socialize small dogs.  We have to, as do most responsible large dog owners, if our dogs are going to be around strangers much.  If they aren't, the  extra socialization up close may not be necessary, but they should at least be able to be in proximity to people without biting.  

I am not a fan of small dogs because of their owners, not the dogs.  There is a stubborn mindset that little dogs are automatically good pets when their owners can't even tell you why terriers were bred.  Their early breeding was to kill something.  Rats, vermin, other animals.  One of my earlier dogs was frightened by loose little terriers that ran in front and behind to circle the dog and then nip heels.  The owner yelled at me, even though my dog was calm and contained and his were loose in a public place.  I shouted back that his dogs were attacking mine and to get the heck out of there now with his dogs.  He was furious because my dog interrupted his play time and mine was, of corse, German Shepherd.   I am usually quite polite, but I said something then I should not have and didn't care who heard me. After that, my dog did not particularly like small animals.  I didn't blame her either.

Gersheps

From: Gersheps

Sep-10

One thing you left out, IMO, is failing to socialize the dog early on.  This is vital with the German Shepherd to develop the proper temperament that the Breed Standard requires.

Steve

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