German Shepherd Dog Forum

Hosted by Showtalk

Promoting responsible German Shepherd Dog ownership

  • 698
    MEMBERS
  • 86396
    MESSAGES
  • 5
    POSTS TODAY

Discussions

Does your dog have FOMO?   German Shepherd News, Videos and Miscellaneous

Started 1/27/18 by DW (GSDogwalker); 748 views.
DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

1/27/18

Your method has a name.

In reply toRe: msg 1
DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

1/27/18

Her picture in the article is upside down.

selzer

From: selzer

1/28/18

Recall is a life-skill. 

Commands should ALWAYS only be given once. 

Commands should be given opportunity to be followed, and if they are not, follow through should happen EVERY time.  One does not allow a life skill to be ignored.  That is not good training. 

Is that really what she wants?  A dog that is outside her window worried about missing out?  It almost sounds like she thinks separation anxiety is a good thing and can be used positively. 

Separation anxiety is a bad thing.  Dogs with it often injure themselves to try and reunite with owners.  They nuisance bark and chew things in an effort to escape or to deal with the anxiety of being left alone.  If they are crated and unable to get to anything, they will chew on themselves.  It is certainly not something we want to develop in our dogs.  Yes, they are companion animals.  But I am perfectly happy if Babs trots into the bedroom after receiving her bit of cheese, leaving me to work a jig saw and listen to books.  Having dogs constantly velcro'd to you is ok...  but I don't necessarily see it is healthy.  Different dogs are different.

We do want them to listen to us the first time, every time.  We do this by not teaching them that they can ignore us.  I don't get the "salute" because when I am training, I do not give commands I cannot enforce immediately.  Commands are rewarded first with treats and praise, and eventually only praise, but I make it worth the dog's while to do what I say.  And, if they do not, I follow through and get them in the position I want anyway, immediately.  So they never get it into their doggy brains that it is optional. 

In reply toRe: msg 3
DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

1/28/18

I took it differently.  It’s not fear so much as intense drive to be with us. FOMO is a very cool term now among young adults but it’s nitm100% accurate. I have used this concept with my dogs and the vacuum.  I had mine who was terrified of it, so I put up a barricade, let one dog in with me and made the other one stay outside and watch.  The lure of being with me and having fun was too strong and soon all the dogs were following me around when I vacuumed because it was the places to be.

AislinnDeb

From: AislinnDeb

1/29/18

To be honest, I wasn't sure which way to take it. I see both what Selzer said and what your said. Enya has been failing her CGC due to throwing a fit if I hand her off and just walk away from her. Yet I can put her in a stay and go out of sight with no problem what so ever. There's no fear to it at all, she just feels she has to be with me. 

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

1/29/18

Her job is to support you and she can’t do it if you are separated.  I have had a dog with serious separation anxiety and it is much different from what is described in the blog.  He literally went crazy if we were separated. He could not stand being away from me, at home, he would curl up in a ball by the door and cry until I returned.  I finally started driving around with him in my car. He went everywhere with me for a long time until I could gradually cure him of it.  Dogs who want to be with us because it’s fun do it from a place of strength and confidence. 

AislinnDeb

From: AislinnDeb

1/29/18

Knock on wood I've never had a dog with separation anxiety. But I've always fallen for puppies/dogs that were very confident. 

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

1/29/18

I took the foster sight unseen from a person with no GSD experience. Their evaluation was all wrong.  I thought I was getting a calm, confident male.  Instead he was a nervebag, but he got so attached to me, I could not pass him on to anyone else.  It took years, but we eventually defeated his anxiety.  

AislinnDeb

From: AislinnDeb

1/29/18

When you foster you never know what is coming in the door. Hence why we have Cap, a sable Border Collie. He was abused and will never leave here. It took two years just to have him come up to my son or I to be petted, IF we were sitting down. He'll never completely recover, but we accept him the way he is and love him despite his problems.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

1/30/18

He is a lucky dog.  Sometimes we can fix it.  I didn’t but it took a long time.

TOP