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We NEED to Talk About Banning Emotional Support Animals   Controversies, Catastrophes and Teaky Moments (Enter at your own risk)

Started Mar-1 by Solitaire13; 1283 views.
Kazell

From: Kazell

Apr-6

I don't think ESAs should be banned but I definitely think there needs to be more enforcement and regulation/education on them. I can't watch the video right now but I do know there are a lot of issues. Perhaps rules that all dogs not in carriers on airplanes are required to wear a basket muzzle? This would prevent any sort of bite regardless of dog breed. In public ESAs aren't allowed anyway if it isn't a place where dogs shouldn't be. And more education to landlords would be nice letting them know what a real ESA letter is and that the internet registries are a crock of poo.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Apr-6

It needs better regulation and breeds that are not suited for it should not be used outside of the home. If someone wants to use a dog in their own home for that purpose, I don’t care.  But I don’t want to run into one on a plane or anywhere else if it is aggressive toward people or dogs.

Kazell

From: Kazell

Apr-6

There isn't anywhere else they can go beside normal public areas such as stores that allow pets, dog parks ect. With how ESAs are set up right now I can't imagine successful regulation on it. And honestly I am against breed regulations in general just because I know that if they get started german shepherds will end up on the breeds regulated. I completely understand not wanting to run in to aggressive dogs but I'd prefer things that are realistic to apply and work. Basket muzzles on dogs in airports will at least prevent attacks from any dogs. Banning breeds stops attacks from those but not from other breeds. And unfortunately because of bad breeding and to put it simply dumb owners there are other breeds becoming an issue. I personally now have a slight bias against golden retrievers in my area because I know of one of the breeders who produces a fair few. Her dogs are not good and some have gone to attempt to be service dogs and I'm sure some are ESAs or fake ESAs. Newfies and st. bernards I'm also seeing an increase in human aggression in both of them. My uncle just got a dog, or well his wife got one and she is an extremely human aggressive st. bernard and they just bred her. Or well the wife did.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Apr-6

Any breed can become aggressive. I saw a woman with two Cavaliers that were snapping at bigger dogs. The Cav owner told the man with the other dogs to please just leave her street.  His dogs weren’t doing a thing except walking.  I have never before seen an aggressive Cav.  My neighbor had four of them.

Kazell

From: Kazell

Apr-7

That's pretty ballsy. Some people are just ridiculous. It's interesting how much environment and genetics play a role. Sometimes it's easy to tell and other times not so much.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Apr-7

I see it’s a combination of not understanding dogs and not caring about other people.  There is an attitude that goes along with it. 

Kazell

From: Kazell

Apr-8

I'd definitely agree with that. It's sad but a lot of people are just completely oblivious. I've actually been on Facebook a lot and have been working on giving advice to people struggling with their dogs. It's really rewarding giving help to people so they can hopefully have better success with their pets. I think if I had more knowledge/experience and time I'd set up training classes to help in person. Some things would be so easy to get a handle on, they just need someone to help them get started. I also wouldn't mind fostering dogs, the lab I had for a short time I learned so much in that time and it's such a good feeling to see what a good home he got in to. I imagine being a successful breeder you'd get to see that too. Anyway I just got a bit off topic there. 

I think one of the biggest issues plauging ESAs right now is just the amount of misinformation. Most of the 'ESA' dogs out there aren't actually ESAs. 

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Apr-8

Rather than a bunch of laws, it might be more helpful to educate everyone on what ESAs are.   Then people can influence behaviors of others around them.

I loved fostering until I burned out.  Taking dogs with potential and teaching them enough to go into someone else’s home is very rewarding.  Dogs with serious behavior problems are very difficult to deal with which is what finally got to me.  You also need to be able to give up a dog after a few weeks or months.  The woman from GSD rescue who did my home check had 14 dogs, all of which started as high need fosters and then she could not give them up.  About half were GSDs and I think many dogs were seniors, so it was a good thing.  But she also worked out of the house full time and I’m not sure it was the best situation for her.  I can’t imagine 14 dogs I had not raised from puppies.

Kazell

From: Kazell

Apr-8

That is insane! There is no way I could handle having 14 dogs!

I don't think I would want to tackle serious issues but I'd be fine doing young dogs who just haven't had anything done with them. From what I've found they are usually good to work with once they realize what's going on. I think if I had 3 dogs I probably wouldn't foster. But 1-2 dogs I could foster. I think the trick is getting dogs that you know won't click with you. For example I could foster labs all day long. I think they're good dogs but no way would I want to keep any of the labs I've been around. Fostering GSDs or some different breeds would be a bit trickier just because I'd be more likely to be working with dogs that suit me. But for me I grew up having a lot of animals going in and out of my house. If I connect with an animal it's either immediately or it takes a few months to years so I'd probably be decent with fostering and maintaining a bond but not getting too overly attached that I can't let them go. I grew up taming and rehoming feral kittens or even just letting them go so I'm used to letting go of animals I've gotten attached to or worked a lot on.

DW (GSDogwalker)

From: DW (GSDogwalker)

Apr-8

I decided before I ever saw the dog that I was keeping it for someone else and I did not get attached.  My last foster was a dog I kept and then I stopped fostering.

I would find a good trainer to apprentice with.  You may feel like you know a lot but nothing beats learning from someone else’s experience.

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