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A forum for posting about laws & pending legislation - both domestic & international, freedom of the press, & online privacy.

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"Leave Our Net Alone"   Activism & Petitions

Started 2/27/12 by Cstar1; 18372 views.
In reply toRe: msg 113
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From: Cstar1

Nov-18

Want to save net neutrality? You need to shout out to your congressmen this week!

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From: Cstar1

Nov-18

  • Edited November 19, 2017 10:11 am  by  Cstar1
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From: Cstar1

Nov-19

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Nov-21

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Nov-21

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From: Cstar1

Nov-22

Lyndy (Lyndy7)

From: Lyndy (Lyndy7)

Nov-22

Cstar1 said:

Jeff Jarvis, on a roll.

this has been featured in today's Delphi Daily News ~ Join In!

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From: Cstar1

Nov-22

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From: Cstar1

Nov-23

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From: Cstar1

Nov-23

The proposed order would leave broadband providers largely if not completely free of oversight

While there’s a lot of focus on repeal of the rules, even more damaging is the proposal to reverse  the FCC’s decision under Tom Wheeler to classify broadband Internet access as an essential “telecommunications service” subject to Title II of the Communications Act. Without such a ruling, the 2015 rules would not have been possible in the first place. 

Reversing that classification would do more than invalidate the rules. It would also remove the FCC’s ability to protect consumers and competition in the broadband market. Among other things, Title II gives the FCC the legal power to protect consumers from fraudulent billing, price gouging, anticompetitive behavior, data breaches, and other practices that violate users’ privacy.  

Chairman Pai’s answer is that the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) “will once again be able to police ISPs, protect consumers, and promote competition, just as it did before 2015.” What he doesn’t say is that the FTC, unlike the FCC, doesn’t have the power to make rules that protect consumers and innovators before they are harmed. Nor does he say that the FTC’s authority wouldn’t prohibit fast lanes, blocking or throttling so long as the broadband provider tells you it’s engaging in those practices.

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