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From: Bob (Bobbylee7) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostApr-1 12:51 PM 
To: All  (1 of 13) 
 41219.1 

How the Jewish Passover Works With The Cross of Christ

 

There are some things we gentiles find strange about Passover. First, it had two Sabbaths, not only the one weekly Sabbath, but Passover also comes with what is called a High Sabbath as well.  Passover is also in Jewish days, which start at sundown, This can be very confusing for gentiles, as we are used to days that start at midnight. The Jews start their days with sundown, or the dawn of darkness, as that’s how God’s first day started, with darkness. Jews even say God had to create darkness and nothingness for a place where He could create the universe. I find that very interesting. I  hope the  following will better show how this, the most major event of all time actually  occurred!

 Passover was established by God for the time His Son would come in the flesh to offer salvation to the world via His sacrifice on the cross. Passover started in Egypt when the Jews spread the blood of the sacrificial lamb on their doors to escape death from the 10th plague.  The blood sacrifice of the sacrificial lamb from the cross is used to escape death, just as it was in Egypt, only this time it’s used to escape eternal death.

.

How Passover days worked in the year of the cross.

In the year of the cross, Passover started on Nissan 10th, the weekly Sabbath day (sundown Friday to sundown Saturday).. On this day every Jewish family brought in to their house the spotless sacrificial lamb and they accepted it as part of their family. In this manner they transferred their sins onto the lamb, which would be sacrificed for their sins. The 10th is also when Jesus rode into Jerusalem on the colt and they accepted Him as their king and Messiah by lying palm branches for Him and saying  “blessed is the King of Israel.” 

John 12:13

13 Took branches of palm trees, and went forth to meet him, and cried, Hosanna: Blessed is the King of Israel that cometh in the name of the Lord.

At sundown on Tuesday the 14th, the Passover High Sabbath came and there was a seder (special meal).The family sacrificial lamb was with them during this seder. During the Passover seder, there are three times when the participants share wine and bread. During one of these times Jesus mentions the wine and bread are symbols of his sacrifice He is about to make. Gentile Christians call it the Last Supper, but it’s directly from the traditional Passover seder. Jesus was not creating a new celebration by doing this. He was explaining why it had been done all this time, to point to his sacrifice for mankind. The Sacrificial Lamb would remain in the house with the family from the 10th to the 14th.

During the 14th (sundown Tuesday to sundown Wednesday) Jesus was arrested on the mount of Olives Tuesday evening and taken to be tried by the Jews, just after the Passover Seder) remember, Jewish day starts with sundown. Early in the morning (still the 14th) he is taken to Pilate at about 6 am, then sent to Herod and then back to Pilate at about 7 am, where he is sentenced to death on the cross and beaten. At around 8 he is lead to Calvary. At 9am (the third hour) he is nailed to the cross and they gamble for his clothes and says “Father forgive them, they know not what they do.”

    

Luke 23:34

 34 Then said Jesus, Father, forgive them; for they know not what they do. And they parted his raiment, and cast lots. KJV

    

Mark 15:25

 25 And it was the third hour, and they crucified him. KJV

                

Jesus was mocked while he hung on the cross.

 

Matt 27:39-40

 39 And they that passed by reviled him, wagging their heads,

40 And saying, Thou that destroyest the temple, and buildest it in three days, save thyself. If thou be the Son of God, come down from the cross. KJV

    

Mark 15:31

 31 Likewise also the chief priests mocking said among themselves with the scribes, He saved others; himself he cannot save. KJV

    

Luke 23:36-37

 36 And the soldiers also mocked him, coming to him, and offering him vinegar,

37 And saying, If thou be the king of the Jews, save thyself. KJV

    

Luke 23:39

 39 And one of the malefactors which were hanged railed on him, saying, If thou be Christ, save thyself and us. KJV

Jesus saves the thief on the cross.

    

Luke 23:40-43

 40 But the other answering rebuked him, saying, Dost not thou fear God, seeing thou art in the same condemnation?

41 And we indeed justly; for we receive the due reward of our deeds: but this man hath done nothing amiss.

42 And he said unto Jesus, Lord, remember me when thou comest into thy kingdom.

43 And Jesus said unto him, Verily I say unto thee, To day shalt thou be with me in paradise. KJV

    

Jesus speaks to Many and John.

 

John 19:26-27

 26 When Jesus therefore saw his mother, and the disciple standing by, whom he loved, he saith unto his mother, Woman, behold thy son!

27 Then saith he to the disciple, Behold thy mother! And from that hour that disciple took her unto his own home. KJV

 

At noon (the sixth hour) darkness covered the land until 3 pm (the ninth hour).

 

Mark 15:33

 33 And when the sixth hour was come, there was darkness over the whole land until the ninth hour. KJV 

At three in the afternoon (the ninth hour),
...[Message truncated]


 

 
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From: Caryn (haleyC987)Apr-3 9:31 AM 
To: All  (2 of 13) 
 41219.2 in reply to 41219.1 

Question: "Is Easter a pagan holiday?"

Answer:
No, Easter is not a pagan holiday. Easter is the Christian celebration of Jesus Christ’s resurrection from the dead. Christians believe that Jesus, the Son of God, died for our sins on a Roman cross, was buried, and rose to life again “on the first day of the week, very early in the morning” (Luke 24:1).

Those who claim that Easter is a pagan holiday usually mean that the word Easter is etymologically linked to the name of an ancient goddess or that various pagan groups also held ceremonies in the springtime. Neither claim carries much weight.

First, we’ll consider the idea that Easter is a pagan holiday because the name Easter has pagan origins. Some say that a Saxon goddess named Eostre is the namesake of our modern holiday. Others say that the word Easter comes from the name of a Germanic goddess named Ostara. The problem with both of these theories is that there is no real evidence that anyone ever worshiped a goddess by either name. The only mention of Eostre comes from a passing reference in the history of the Venerable Bede. The first mention of a goddess named Ostara is in a book by Jakob Grimm—and Grimm admitted that he could find no solid link between Easter and pagan celebrations.

Next, we’ll consider the idea that Easter is a pagan holiday because its springtime observance coincides with those of pagan religions. There are a plethora of pagan holidays that occur during the season covered by Easter: the Day of Bau (Babylonian), Dark Mother Day (Indian), the Day of Fortuna (Roman), the Feast of Blajini (Romanian), the Feast of Artemis/Diana (Greek/Roman), the Feast of Tellus Mater (Roman), the Festival of Ba’ast (Egyptian), the Festival of Ishtar (Babylonian), the Feast of Elaphebolia (Athenian), and Odin’s Day (Norse), to name a few. But sharing a date on the calendar is no proof that two holidays are related. A married couple who celebrate their wedding anniversary on October 31 should not be accused of appropriating Halloween.

In short, claims that Easter is a pagan holiday are based on hearsay, assumptions, and inferences, with no hard evidence to back them up. Even if Easter Sunday were a Christianized version of an ancient pagan holiday, it would not mean that Easter itself is a pagan holiday. No one today is sacrificing to a goddess named Eostre or Ostara. Regardless of what a day may once have meant, its observance today needs to be evaluated on the basis of what it means today. Christians celebrating Easter are no more pagan than are churches who gather to worship on Sunday (so named because it was the pagan “Day of the Sun”). The pagan origins of the names of the days of the week have nothing to do with the church’s weekly gatherings, and ancient pagan spring festivals have no real bearing on the modern Christian celebration of Easter.

Although not written about Easter, Romans 14:5–6 can apply: “One person considers one day more sacred than another; another considers every day alike. Each of them should be fully convinced in their own mind. Whoever regards one day as special does so to the Lord.” If an individual Christian worries about some aspects of an Easter celebration, that Christian should do what he or she believes to be right. He should not judge others who celebrate differently, nor should the others judge him when no clear biblical guideline is involved.

https://www.gotquestions.org/Easter-pagan-holiday.html

 

 

 
From: Len (AryehLeib613)Apr-4 10:17 PM 
To: Caryn (haleyC987)  (3 of 13) 
 41219.3 in reply to 41219.2 

What does this have to do with Passover?

 

 
From: Len (AryehLeib613)Apr-4 10:41 PM 
To: Bob (Bobbylee7) DelphiPlus Member Icon  (4 of 13) 
 41219.4 in reply to 41219.1 

Just to comment on your Jewish misinterpretations:

>>On this day every Jewish family brought in to their house the spotless sacrificial lamb and they accepted it as part of their family. In this manner they transferred their sins onto the lamb, which would be sacrificed for their sins.

  • Chap. 12 of Exodus, which includes the commandment about the lamb, says absolutely nothing about transfer of sins.
  • In Judaism the festival of first fruits is Shavuot/Weeks that occurs 50 days following the first day of Passover.

Incidentally, Mark,  Matthew and Luke have the Last Supper as a Passover seder but John has it as the day before Passover.

  • Edited April 4, 2021 10:53 pm  by  Len (AryehLeib613)
 

 
From: Caryn (haleyC987)Apr-5 10:09 AM 
To: Len (AryehLeib613)  (5 of 13) 
 41219.5 in reply to 41219.3 

Len (AryehLeib613) said...

What does this have to do with Passover?

To begin with, there have always been two ancient Jewish calendars used, one counting day 1 the first day and the other beginning count with 0 beginning day 1.  Ancient historically to-date, Israel uses any type count beginning 0.  But according to the Jewish Lunar calendar falling a day later every 200 years, Passover and Easter overlap but for a few times Passover a month later every 19 year cycle.

 

  • Edited April 5, 2021 11:15 am  by  Caryn (haleyC987)
 

 
From: Bob (Bobbylee7) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostApr-5 5:55 PM 
To: Caryn (haleyC987)  (6 of 13) 
 41219.6 in reply to 41219.2 

I think Easter was a carryover from a pagan holiday, and pagans may honor it even today to as a different event from the gentle Christian Easter. 


 

 

 
From: Bob (Bobbylee7) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostApr-5 5:57 PM 
To: Len (AryehLeib613)  (7 of 13) 
 41219.7 in reply to 41219.4 

Just to comment on your Jewish misinterpretations:

>>On this day every Jewish family brought in to their house the spotless sacrificial lamb and they accepted it as part of their family. In this manner they transferred their sins onto the lamb, which would be sacrificed for their sins.

  • Chap. 12 of Exodus, which includes the commandment about the lamb, says absolutely nothing about transfer of sins.
  • In Judaism the festival of first fruits is Shavuot/Weeks that occurs 50 days following the first day of Passover.

Incidentally, Mark,  Matthew and Luke have the Last Supper as a Passover seder but John has it as the day before Passover.

bob>Did Jewish families bring lambs into their families that would be used for their passover lamb? Why? 

When did the passover lamb become the passover Ham? LOL


 

 

 
From: Secundus555Apr-5 8:43 PM 
To: Bob (Bobbylee7) DelphiPlus Member Icon  (8 of 13) 
 41219.8 in reply to 41219.6 

Bob (Bobbylee7) said...

I think Easter was a carryover from a pagan holiday, and pagans may honor it even today to as a different event from the gentle Christian Easter. 

It was not. 

It was ALWAYS a Christian celebration of the Resurrection. It did NOT come from paganism.

EASTER, ISHTAR, EOSTRE AND EGGS

 

Nothing about Easter/Pascha is/was pagan.

It was always based on the Death and Resurrection of Christ. 

Jesus rose on Sunday, Bob. Not Saturday.  So says ALL FOUR Gospels and ALL of the Early Church Fathers, including the men who were personally taught by the Apostles themselves. 

I choose to believe THAT over someone coming along 2,000 yrs later, thinking they know better than the Gospel Writers and the entire Early Church. 

 

Secundus

 

 

 
From: Len (AryehLeib613)Apr-6 12:28 AM 
To: Bob (Bobbylee7) DelphiPlus Member Icon  (9 of 13) 
 41219.9 in reply to 41219.7 

Bob>Did Jewish families bring lambs into their families that would be used for their passover lamb? Why? 

I don't understand your question.

The Israelites were shepherds and had herds. (Gen. 47:3, Exod. 8:21f)

 

 
From: Bob (Bobbylee7) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostApr-7 11:19 AM 
To: Len (AryehLeib613)  (10 of 13) 
 41219.10 in reply to 41219.9 

Bob>Did Jewish families bring lambs into their families that would be used for their passover lamb? Why? 

I don't understand your question.

The Israelites were shepherds and had herds. (Gen. 47:3, Exod. 8:21f)

bob>In speaking of the times of the bible, did Jewish families obtain/get a lamb to be their passover lamb during the passover celebration? Which means they would consume it during the event as well.


 

 

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