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From: Leah (muppetmel1) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostOct-1 2:21 PM 
To: All  (3481 of 3529) 
 1654.3481 in reply to 1654.3480 

The Rabbi Jacob S. Kassin Memorial Halacha Series
Authored by Rabbi Eli J. Mansour (9/30/2021)

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Dedicated Today In Memory Of Yona bat Ester A"H
by Friends and Family

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Audio Length: 4:42
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Description: May a Man Recite Habdala for His Wife if He Had Already Recited or Heard Habdala?

The Shulhan Aruch (Orah Haim 266:8) rules that the requirement of Habdala on Mosa’eh Shabbat constitutes a Torah obligation, just like Kiddush, and that this Misva applies equally to both men and women, just like Kiddush. Therefore, since women are obligated in this Misva, a man is allowed to recite Habdala for a woman even if he had already recited or heard Habdala. Since the woman needs to fulfill her obligation, a man may recite Habdala for her even though he had already fulfilled his obligation.

Thus, for example, if a husband heard Habdala in the synagogue, or was the Hazan and recited Habdala there, he may recite Habdala for his wife when he comes home. This is the ruling of the Hid"a (Rav Haim Yosef David Azulai, 1724-1806), in Birkeh Yosef. However, since some authorities dispute this ruling, Hacham Bension Abba Shaul (Israel, 1923-1998), as well as Hacham Ovadia Yosef, ruled that it is preferable for a husband to have in mind not to fulfill his Habdala obligation in the synagogue. This way, he can recite Habdala for his wife according to all opinions. Nevertheless, if the husband did fulfill his requirement in the synagogue, he may recite Habdala for his wife, in accordance with the Shulhan Aruch’s ruling.

In such a case, where the husband had already recited Habdala in the synagogue and now recites Habdala for his wife, the wife should recite the Beracha over the Besamim. Since the husband is not required to smell Besamim, reciting the Beracha over the Besamim could constitute a Hefsek (interruption) in between the Beracha over the wine and his drinking the wine. Therefore, the wife should recite the Beracha over the Besamim. Likewise, the wife should recite the Beracha over the f
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From: Leah (muppetmel1) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostOct-1 2:21 PM 
To: All  (3482 of 3529) 
 1654.3482 in reply to 1654.3481 

The Rabbi Jacob S. Kassin Memorial Halacha Series
Authored by Rabbi Eli J. Mansour (10/1/2021)

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Dedicated Today In Memory Of Yona bat Ester A"H
by Friends and Family

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Audio Length: 5:49
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Description: Habdala – Using Beverages Other Than Wine; Drinking the Wine

A number of Halachic authorities, including the Rama (Rav Moshe Isserles of Cracow, 1525-1572) and the Ben Ish Hai (Rav Yosef Haim of Baghdad, 1833-1909), record a custom to pour some wine out of the Habdala cup after the conclusion of Habdala, and then extinguish the candle in the wine that was poured. It is also customary to take some of the leftover wine and place it on one’s eyes and face. This is done for the purpose of Hibub Misva – to demonstrate our love and affection for the Misvot. The Hid"a (Rav Haim Yosef David Azulai, 1724-1806) emphasizes that one should not underestimate the importance of "Shiyureh Misva" – the "leftovers" of a Misva. Showing our love for that which had been used for a Misva, even if it only the "leftovers," is very significant, and has the power to save a person from calamity.

The Rama also writes (as understood by the Aruch Ha’shulhan) that it is customary to fill the cup before Habdala all the way to the rim, so that some wine will automatically spill when one lifts the cup, as an overflowing cup can bring blessing. This is mentioned also by the Ben Ish Hai, and this is, indeed, the accepted practice.

Although it is customary to add several drops of water to one’s cup of wine on other occasions, Rav Haim Vital (1542-1620) taught that this is not done with the Habdala cup.

The Shulhan Aruch writes that one may not recite Habdala over bread. Kiddush may be recited over bread, because Halacha requires reciting Kiddush in the framework of a meal, and thus the Kiddush is connected to the bread. Habdala, however, does not need to be recited in the fram
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From: Leah (muppetmel1) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostOct-3 4:45 AM 
To: All  (3483 of 3529) 
 1654.3483 in reply to 1654.3482 

The Rabbi Jacob S. Kassin Memorial Halacha Series
Authored by Rabbi Eli J. Mansour (10/3/2021)

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Dedicated Today In Memory Of Yona bat Ester A"H
by Friends and Family

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Audio Length: 7:15
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Description: Why is Cooking Prohibited on Shabbat?

The Torah only prohibited Melachot (forbidden labor) on Shabbat done in a direct, active fashion. For example, the act of Borer (sorting) or Kotev (writing) is itself a violation of Shabbat. However, Melachot achieved by indirect causes are known as "Gerama" and are not prohibited by the Torah. For example, The Torah prohibition of Mechabeh (extinguishing a fire) applies only to an act where a person directly poured water on a fire. However, it is permitted to extinguish with Gerama, whereby a person set up bottles of water in the path of the blaze, which would burst when the fire reaches them and extinguish it.

The Rishon Lesion, Hacham Yishak Yosef, asked why then is Bishul (cooking) prohibited on Shabbat. All a person did was put a pot of food on the fire; it is the fire which cooks the food by itself over time. A similar question could be raised regarding the Melacha of Zorea (planting). The act of putting the seed in the ground is only a cause for the eventual germination of the seed. Why then is it considered a Melacha?

Hacham Yishak answered that Gerama is only exempt when there is a direct way to accomplish the Melacha and yet a person did it indirectly. However, in cases like cooking and planting, the only way to accomplish the Melacha is through Gerama. Therefore, that becomes the halachic definition of the Melacha which the Torah prohibited.
This is analogous to the famous insight of the Hatam Sofer (R. Moshe Sofer, 1762-1839, Hungary) that any case in which Gerama becomes the standard way to perform the Melacha becomes prohibited. For example, the special electric Shabbat wheel chair developed in Israel operates on a Gerama mechanism. According to the Hatam Sofer, since it was designe
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From: Leah (muppetmel1) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostOct-8 1:06 PM 
To: All  (3484 of 3529) 
 1654.3484 in reply to 1654.3483 

The Rabbi Jacob S. Kassin Memorial Halacha Series
Authored by Rabbi Eli J. Mansour (10/4/2021)

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Dedicated Today In Memory Of Yona bat Ester A"H
by Friends and Family

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Audio Length: 2:20
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Description: May One Leave a PayPal Account Active on Shabbat?

The Halacha prohibits conducting business transactions, "Mekach U’Memkar," on Shabbat. In the era of e-commerce, many new questions arise. For example, the Poskim discuss whether it is permissible to leave a PayPal account active on Shabbat. The issue is whether any money deposited on Shabbat or Yom Tob constitutes a prohibited transaction.

The consensus is to be lenient, provided the Jew did not instruct that the money be deposited specifically on Shabbat. The precedent for this ruling is found in Shulhan Aruch (Siman 246), where Maran permits giving money to a non-Jew to make a purchase, without specifically indicating to do so on Shabbat. The fact that the non-Jew actually bought the items for the Jew on Shabbat is inconsequential. Maran also rules (Siman 243) that the only reason it is prohibited to hire a non-Jew to manage a bathhouse is "Marit Ayin," people may misconstrue the arrangement. He does not cite the problem of the non-Jew receiving the money on the Jew’s behalf. From these precedents, it is derived that one may leave his PayPal account active on Shabbat, and any money deposited on Shabbat is permitted for use immediately after Shabbat.

SUMMARY
It is permitted to leave a Pay Pal account active on Shabbat.

 

 
From: Leah (muppetmel1) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostOct-8 1:07 PM 
To: All  (3485 of 3529) 
 1654.3485 in reply to 1654.3484 

The Rabbi Jacob S. Kassin Memorial Halacha Series
Authored by Rabbi Eli J. Mansour (10/5/2021)

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Dedicated Today In Memory Of Yona bat Ester A"H
by Friends and Family

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Audio Length: 3:47
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Description: May e-Commerce be Conducted on Shabbat?

The prevalence of e-commerce poses a question regarding Shabbat. Must one must disable his retail website on Shabbat, in order to prevent transactions from occurring during Shabbat?

The Halachic precedent for this issue is found in the Poskim who discuss whether a Jew may keep his vending machines operating on Shabbat. Does the sale of goods and receipt of money on Shabbat by an automated machine present a problem on Shabbat? The responsa of the MaHarshag (Rav Shimon Greenfeld, 1860-1930, Hungary, Vol. 2:117) concludes that one may be lenient, assuming that the majority of customers are non-Jews, and the machines are not located on the Jew’s premises. This is also the opinion of the Be’er Moshe (Rav Moshe Stern of Debrecyn) in his Kuntres HaChashmal (p.84), Shemirat Shabbat K’hilchata (Rav Yehoshua Novert, 1927-1203, Hungary, Ch. 25:29) and Rav Shelomo Miller.

Presumably, the case of e-commerce websites is analogous to vending machines and would also be permitted on Shabbat.

The Poskim add that if one does keep his website open for business on Shabbat, it is preferable to adjust the settings so that the credit card details entered are processed only after Shabbat.
It should be noted that some Poskim reject this leniency and prohibit e-commerce on Shabbat. One who is stringent in accordance with their opinon, Tavo Alav Beracha, is considered praiseworthy. For a beautiful and clear analysis of this subject, see "Commerce on Shabbat,"(p. 184).

SUMMARY: One may keep his e-commerce website operating on Shabbat.

 

 
From: Leah (muppetmel1) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostOct-8 1:08 PM 
To: All  (3486 of 3529) 
 1654.3486 in reply to 1654.3485 

The Rabbi Jacob S. Kassin Memorial Halacha Series
Authored by Rabbi Eli J. Mansour (10/6/2021)

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Dedicated Today In Memory Of Yona bat Ester A"H
by Friends and Family

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Audio Length: 3:04
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Description: May a Jew Engage a Customer Service Company on Shabbat?

The Poskim discuss a case in which a Jewish company outsources its customer service to a non-Jewishly owned call-center. The question is whether the center is allowed to take calls on behalf of the Jewish company on Shabbat.

The first factor that must be ascertained is the arrangement for payment. If they are being paid on a per-hour or per-day basis, it is prohibited. In such an arrangement, the call-center acts the Jew’s agent to violate Shabbat. However, if they are paid based on call volume, they are considered a "Kablan," a per-task contractor; any work done on Shabbat is done on their own volition for their incentive to make more money.

Even if the call center is deemed a "Kablan," it is still prohibited to specifically instruct them to work on Shabbat. Rav Shlomo Miller, based on the Shulhan Aruch HaRav (Rabbi Shneur Zalman of Liadi, Russia, 1745-1813, Siman 244), ruled that such an arrangement would be permitted if the Jew makes it clear at the outset that he does not demand that the company work on Shabbat, and that they will not be held liable if they fail to offer service on Shabbat. In such a case, any work done on Shabbat is not connected with the Jew.

SUMMARY: It is permitted to hire a Non-Jewish customer service center to answer calls on Shabbat only if they are paid on a per-task basis and the Jew informs them that they are not obligated to work on Shabbat.

 

 
From: Leah (muppetmel1) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostOct-8 1:09 PM 
To: All  (3487 of 3529) 
 1654.3487 in reply to 1654.3486 

The Rabbi Jacob S. Kassin Memorial Halacha Series
Authored by Rabbi Eli J. Mansour (10/7/2021)

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Dedicated Today In Memory Of Yona bat Ester A"H
by Friends and Family

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Audio Length: 2:40
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Description: Is it Permissible to Schedule a Bank Payment for Shabbat?

With the advent of online banking, the question arises as to whether one may schedule an automated payment from his bank account on Shabbat. Would such a transaction constitute a violation of the Rabbinic prohibition of making a "Kinyan" (Transaction) on Shabbat? On one hand, the instructions were issued before Shabbat, but the actual transfer was conducted on Shabbat.

The precedent for this question is found in the responsa of Rabbi Akiva Eiger. He discusses a case in which a father gave the Kohen five Shekalim for the Misva of Pidyon HaBen, redeeming the first born, on Friday. However, the father stipulated that the Kohen would not assume ownership of the coins until Shabbat. Rabbi Akiva Eger (1761-1837) concluded that such a transaction, initiated on Friday and ending on Shabbat, is prohibited. One might draw the same conclusion in the case of scheduling a bank payment.

Nevertheless, the Poskim point out a significant difference between the cases. In the case of the bank, the transaction is not executed by a person; it is done by means of computer. The general principle in the Halachot of Shabbat states that a person is not responsible for Melacha performed by his utensils. For example, one is allowed to put wheat in a mill on Friday, knowing that it will be ground on Shabbat automatically by means of water or wind. Similarly, one may set an automatic sprinkler system to be activated on Shabbat, since it is only the tools which are working. Since computers are also utensils, they too may be set to perform transactions on Shabbat.

SUMMARY: It is permissible to schedule an automatic bank payment for Shabbat.

 

 
From: Leah (muppetmel1) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostOct-8 1:10 PM 
To: All  (3488 of 3529) 
 1654.3488 in reply to 1654.3487 

The Rabbi Jacob S. Kassin Memorial Halacha Series
Authored by Rabbi Eli J. Mansour (10/8/2021)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Dedicated Today In Memory Of Yona bat Ester A"H
by Friends and Family

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


Audio Length: 2:00
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Description: May One Allow a Plumber to Perform Repairs on Shabbat?

The Mishna Berura (252:17) cites the Hayeh Adam (Rav Abraham Danzig of Vilna, 1748-1820) who rules that one may not allow a technician to remain in his house on Shabbat to complete repairs. Even though the technician is working on the basis of "Kablanut," a fixed fee per task, it is prohibited, because of "Marit Ayin." Outside observers may misconstrue the circumstances of the employment.

There is one exception to this principle. In cases where there is an issue of "Kavod Habriyot" (Human Dignity), e.g. a plumbing emergency, one may allow the technician to complete the repair. The Halachic weight of Kavod Habriyot overrides the concern of "Marit Ayin," which is a Rabbinic enactment.

SUMMARY
One may allow a technician to complete repairs in his home on Shabbat under circumstances compromising "Kavod Habriyot."

 
 

 
From: Leah (muppetmel1) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostOct-10 9:12 AM 
To: All  (3489 of 3529) 
 1654.3489 in reply to 1654.3488 

The Rabbi Jacob S. Kassin Memorial Halacha Series
Authored by Rabbi Eli J. Mansour (10/10/2021)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Dedicated Today In Memory Of Yona bat Ester A"H
by Friends and Family

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


Audio Length: 1:59
Listen   Download MP3 (468 KB)

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Description: Is it Permissible to Have a Check Cashed on Shabbat?

The Halacha delineates three conditions that must be present in order for a non-Jew to perform work for a Jew on Shabbat. First, he must be Kablan, paid on a per-task basis. Second, The Jew is prohibited from instructing him to specifically perform the task on Shabbat. Finally, the task must be performed outside of the Jew’s premises.

Therefore, on may not give a check to a bank teller before Shabbat, instructing him to deposit the check on Shabbat. Although the teller is a Kablan and does not perform his work on the Jew’s premises, the Jew is prohibited from telling him to do the work specifically on Shabbat. However, one may send a check to the bank via mail on Friday, knowing that the check will arrive and be deposited on Shabbat. Since the Jew did not send the check via express mail so that it would specifically be deposited on Shabbat, it is permitted.

SUMMARY: It is prohibited to leave a check with a bank teller on Friday, instructing him to deposit the check on Shabbat.

 

 
From: Leah (muppetmel1) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by hostOct-11 9:07 AM 
To: All  (3490 of 3529) 
 1654.3490 in reply to 1654.3489 

The Rabbi Jacob S. Kassin Memorial Halacha Series
Authored by Rabbi Eli J. Mansour (10/11/2021)

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

Dedicated Today In Memory Of Yona bat Ester A"H
by Friends and Family

* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *


Audio Length: 2:02
Listen   Download MP3 (478 KB)

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Description: Is it Permitted to Participate in an Online Auction Taking Place on Shabbat?

The Poskim discuss whether one may submit a bid during the week for an online auction that will take place on Shabbat. Does a winning bid constitute "Mekach U’Memkar"-business transaction on Shabbat? The Poskim conclude that it is permitted, since the acceptance of the bid on Shabbat is not the consummation of the transaction. At that point, the winner merely becomes obligated to pay his bid at a later date. Alternatively, there are platforms in which he already made his commitment in the contract at the time of the bidding, before Shabbat. However, it is prohibited to participate in an online auction, in which the bidder pre-programs his account to submit the bid on Shabbat.

SUMMARY
It is permitted to place a bid before Shabbat in an online auction that will conclude on Shabbat.

 

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