Culture and History -  Legend or the Cherokee Rose (31 views) Notify me whenever anyone posts in this discussion.Subscribe
 
From: Coconut Queen (JEANNE2469) DelphiPlus Member Icon10/5/07 5:41 PM 
To: All  (1 of 5) 
 2274.1 

This story always sends me into tears....

Legend of the Cherokee Rose

When the Trail of Tears started in 1838, the mothers of the Cherokee were grieving and crying so much, they were unable to help their children survive the journey. The elders prayed for a sign that would lift the mother’s spirits to give them strength. The next day a beautiful rose began to grow where each of the mother’s tears fell. The rose is white for their tears; a gold center represents the gold taken from Cherokee lands, and seven leaves on each stem for the seven Cherokee clans. The wild Cherokee Rose grows along the route of the Trail of Tears into eastern Oklahoma today.

Source: The Cherokee 1994 Heritage Calendar by Dorothy Sullivan, Memoray Circle Studio, Norman, Ok.

From http://www.powersource.com/cherokee/rose.html

Picture from http://www.herbnet.com/magazine/mag6_p02__cherokeerose.htm

 

Jeanne

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From: Cherokee21 DelphiPlus Member Icon10/8/07 4:57 PM 
To: Coconut Queen (JEANNE2469) DelphiPlus Member Icon  (2 of 5) 
 2274.2 in reply to 2274.1 

Yeah, it is a heart wrencher.
Have you read up much on the Trail of Tears Jeanne?

Here is a site that has more history and some links on it.

http://www.geocities.com/troglennews/

Tim

  • Edited 10/8/2007 4:59 pm ET by Cherokee21
 

 
From: Coconut Queen (JEANNE2469) DelphiPlus Member Icon10/9/07 12:13 AM 
To: Cherokee21 DelphiPlus Member Icon  (3 of 5) 
 2274.3 in reply to 2274.2 

Wow, what a wonderful site!  You put a great deal of time and effort into it, didn't you?

I know a little about the Trail of Tears; what I learned about it was from an historical novel called "Walk in My Soul" and from Wilma Mankiller's autobiography.  "Walk in My Soul" was a fictionalized account of the life of Tiana Rogers.

I just don't know how anyone survived that forced march; it was really grueling.  There are definitely things that happen that make you wonder how people can be so very, very cruel to other people.

You mention in your site that the Cherokee literacy rate rivaled the whites' literacy rate.  Actually, I had read that there was a time when the Cherokee literacy rate was higher than that of their white contemporaries.  I stumbled upon author John Rollin Ridge of the well-know Cherokee Ridge family.  Having grown up in California, the Gold Rush era and Joaquin Murietta have long been interest of mine.  It was John Rollin Ridge, who was in California at the time of the Juaquin Murietta bru-ha-ha, who wrote a fictionalized account of the life and times of Joaquin to illustrate the treatment of non-whites by whites. 

In the material I read about John Rollin Ridge, it was brought out that his uncle, Elias Boudinot, was the publilsher of the Cherokee Phoenix and at the time of John's birth in the early 1820s, the Cherokee literacy rate was actually higher than of their contemporary whites in Georgia.

John Rollin Ridge's book about Joaquin was a huge best seller at the time - this was in the mid 1800s - and it was his fictionalization of Joaquin that was the basis for "Zorro."  So, you can see how this Cherokee had a lasting effect on "mainstream" America for over 100 years.  I remember when I was a kid in the mid to late 50s, the "Zorro" episodes on the Micky Mouse Club TV show were very popular.  And not too long ago, there was a movie about Zorro with Anthony Banderas (sp?).

Zorro and what he represents still cuts a dashing and romantic figure - in addition to cutting the "Z that stands for Zorro" in the seat of the pants of offenders with his sword.  Oh, how we kids loved that!

But, I'm getting off topic now.

 

Jeanne

MiscHonolulu029.jpg Sun Behind The Palms picture by coconutqueen_hawaii

KamehamehaStatueandWaikiki024.jpg King Kamehameha Statue Downtown Honolulu picture by coconutqueen_hawaii

 

 

 
From: Cherokee21 DelphiPlus Member Icon10/9/07 8:23 PM 
To: Coconut Queen (JEANNE2469) DelphiPlus Member Icon  (4 of 5) 
 2274.4 in reply to 2274.3 

Yes, Ridge....not one of my favorite NDNS of all time. Actually to me, he was a traitor to the people for being on the illegal treaty committee which made way for the forced removal.

Tim

 

 
From: Coconut Queen (JEANNE2469) DelphiPlus Member Icon10/9/07 11:18 PM 
To: Cherokee21 DelphiPlus Member Icon  (5 of 5) 
 2274.5 in reply to 2274.4 

It certainly appears, from what I've read, that the Ridge-Watie-Boudinot family embraced assimilation.  Perhaps they thought assimilation would make it "easier" to "get along?"  I don't know and it's difficult to guess after so many years.

The Trail of Tears is most certainly a very painful part of our collective history.  It's still a wonder to me that anyone survived it - it was truly harsh in every way possible - phycsically, emotionally, spiritually, and mentally. 

PS, after again reading about John Rollin Ridge on the New Georgia Encyclopedia site.  The more I read about him, the more of a puzzlement he is to me.

 

Jeanne

MiscHonolulu029.jpg Sun Behind The Palms picture by coconutqueen_hawaii

KamehamehaStatueandWaikiki024.jpg King Kamehameha Statue Downtown Honolulu picture by coconutqueen_hawaii

  • Edited 10/9/2007 11:40 pm by Coconut Queen (JEANNE2469)
 

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