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LifeRing Recovery: a self-help alternative for recovery from alcoholism and other chemical dependency. Group support for abstinence from alcohol and “drugs” by empowering the sober self within you. Completely secular: no prayers, Higher Powers or Steps.

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Mary's Sober Diary   Sobriety/Recovery Journals

Started 12/8/08 by marylouise50; 46094 views.
MaryLouise3

From: MaryLouise3

Dec-25

Just popping in here to send festive greetings to regulars and those lurking.

May we all have a sober and peaceful 2020

xMary in Africa

Brian (BrianB125)

From: Brian (BrianB125)

Dec-25

Thanks Mary, best wishes to all.

Brian

MaryLouise3

From: MaryLouise3

Jan-4

Coming back here to bookmark an entry for the beginning of another year, 2020.

Posting a link to a NYT article: this was posted on a mailing list by Craig Whalley and leading to some discussion by women who had spent time in AA or who need better models of non-hierarchical. recovery

Opinion | The Patriarchy of Alcoholics Anonymous

MaryLouise3

From: MaryLouise3

Jan-6

Bookmarking this too as a resource for anyone reading as a newcomer: how the brain recovers in abstinence.

https://www.verywellmind.com/brain-cells-rebound-with-alcohol-abstinence-66614

MaryLouise3

From: MaryLouise3

Jan-16

New research mentioned by a friend  who is interested in therapies reversing neurodevelopmental disorders in adults.

Excerpt from article

Additionally, these results may also have implications for treating other disorders, such as brain injury, stroke, addiction, etc. For example, prolonged substance abuse leads to stable molecular, cellular, structural, and behavioral changes that present a formidable problem for recovering patients (Volkow and Li, 2005). The results reviewed here suggest that correcting the maladaptive biochemical states brought about by these disorders (e.g, addiction, brain injury, etc.) may allow the brain to recover, even when key neuroanatomical changes associated with pathology are not reversed. In addition to correcting disrupted molecular processes, it is possible that manipulations that reopen highly plastic developmental states may facilitate recovery from neurodevelopmental disorders, addiction, or any other disorder that disrupts the structure and function of the brain. Altogether the findings reviewed here raise the possibility that adult treatments could one day help the many millions of people affected with neurodevelopmental disorders. They also highlight the importance and urgency of understanding the absolutely fascinating ability of the adult brain to reinvent itself.

Link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2710296/

MaryLouise3

From: MaryLouise3

Feb-12

Hi everyone, and especially Michael. I'm now posting in the Sobriety/Recovery Journals  folder after getting All Discussions brought up and checking through folders. Michael what you might do is to find this folder and then click on New Topic and give your own journals a title.

Let me know if this works for you.

Mary Louise the neo-Luddite of forums

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