Children's Health/Needs -  Protecting Baby from Crib Death (SIDS) (1517 views) Notify me whenever anyone posts in this discussion.Subscribe
 
From: Debby (DEBBIE2476) DelphiPlus Member Icon8/20/01 12:20 AM 
To: All  (1 of 38) 
 12539.1 
HealthScout
Sunday August 19 12:07 PM EDT
"Baby Molds
By Nancy A. Melville
HealthScoutNews Reporter

SUNDAY, Aug. 19 (HealthScoutNews) -- With babies today sleeping mostly on their backs to prevent crib death, doctors are beginning to see an occasional side effect: flat heads.
Although experts stress that the small risk should in no way prevent parents from making sure infants sleep on their backs, doctors increasingly are noting the problem and finding ways to address it.
The latest technique: a helmet custom-designed to correct shape problems in the skull."

http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010819/hl/baby_molds_1.html


ASST. MANAGER, TOPGUN'S FRIENDLY SKIES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, MEDICAL FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, PERSONAL LAW FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, SOUTHERN STATES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, WISHING WELL

"Some people come into our lives and quietly go. Others stay for awhile and leave footprints on our hearts and we are never the same."
Click for Sun City, Arizona Forecast
 

 
From: Debby (DEBBIE2476) DelphiPlus Member Icon9/18/01 1:59 PM 
To: All  (2 of 38) 
 12539.2 in reply to 12539.1 
Tuesday September 18 12:10 PM EDT
Sweet Dreams

(HealthScoutNews) -- Finally, your baby is ready for a nap, and that means a break for you, too. But don't forget to take precautions against sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) and other sleeping hazards.
The American Academy of Pediatrics says babies should never be allowed to sleep on their tummies. The "Back-to-Sleep" campaign has greatly reduced the number of SIDS deaths in recent years.
Other tips: Don't use a waterbed or a sheepskin-type cover that could cause suffocation; keep pillows and toys out of the crib; crib sides should be at least 22 inches high; make sure mattress pads and sheets fit snugly, and don't use thin plastic or garment bags as a mattress cover.
The academy says that while babies should never sleep on the stomachs, they should spend some time on their tummies while awake each day. It's important for their physical development."

http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20010918/hl/sweet_dreams_1.html


ASST. MANAGER, TOPGUN'S FRIENDLY SKIES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, MEDICAL FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, PERSONAL LAW FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, SOUTHERN STATES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, WISHING WELL

"Some people come into our lives and quietly go. Others stay for awhile and leave footprints on our hearts and we are never the same."
Click for Sun City, Arizona Forecast
 

 
From: Debby (DEBBIE2476) DelphiPlus Member Icon10/25/01 11:28 AM 
To: All  (3 of 38) 
 12539.3 in reply to 12539.2 
BBC
Thursday, 25 October, 2001, 11:34 GMT 12:34 UK
"Hospital cot death failings

Most maternity units in Britain are failing to follow basic guidelines to avoid cot death, a leading charity has warned.
The Foundation for the Study of Infant Deaths (FSID) conducted a survey in 83 maternity units throughout the UK during 2000.
It found that 97.6% of maternity units were too hot, many babies were not routinely put to sleep on their backs and in many hospitals mothers were not given the necessary information.
In response to the survey the charity has produced an eye-catching sticker to be placed on hospital cots advising mothers of the necessary precautions they need to take.
The cartoon stickers, which have now been sent to hospitals throughout the UK, shows that babies should sleep on their backs and that overheating is risky for cot death."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid_1615000/1615384.stm


ASST. MANAGER, TOPGUN'S FRIENDLY SKIES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, MEDICAL FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, PERSONAL LAW FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, SOUTHERN STATES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, WISHING WELL

"Some people come into our lives and quietly go. Others stay for awhile and leave footprints on our hearts and we are never the same."
Click for Bryson City, North Carolina Forecast
 

 
From: Debby (DEBBIE2476) DelphiPlus Member Icon10/25/01 12:43 PM 
To: All  (4 of 38) 
 12539.4 in reply to 12539.3 
Thursday October 25 12:07 PM EDT
"Infant Sleep Mode Affects Head Control
By Linda Searing
HealthScoutNews Reporter

THURSDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthScoutNews) -- Babies who sleep on their backs seem to take longer learning to lift and control their heads, contends a new study.
But that's OK, child health experts say, because the benefits of back-sleeping -- namely, a significant cut in the risk of sudden, unexplained death -- far outweigh what they consider short-term coordination losses.
Baby deaths from sudden infant death syndrome, or SIDS, also called crib death, have dropped more than 50 percent in the decade since the American Academy of Pediatrics and the federal government launched a nationwide campaign to encourage parents to place babies on their backs at nap time and nighttime, according to Judith Jacobson, executive vice president of the SIDS Alliance.
In 1992, SIDS claimed the lives of more than 5,000 infants, but Jacobson says a new report she received this month from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention showed 2,151 SIDS cases last year."

http://dailynews.yahoo.com/h/hsn/20011025/hl/infant_sleep_mode_affects_head_control_1.html


ASST. MANAGER, TOPGUN'S FRIENDLY SKIES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, MEDICAL FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, PERSONAL LAW FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, SOUTHERN STATES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, WISHING WELL

"Some people come into our lives and quietly go. Others stay for awhile and leave footprints on our hearts and we are never the same."
Click for Bryson City, North Carolina Forecast
 

 
From: Debby (DEBBIE2476) DelphiPlus Member Icon11/4/01 4:07 PM 
To: All  (5 of 38) 
 12539.5 in reply to 12539.4 
Seattle Times
"Sudden infant death syndrome is still a mystery — but a far less common killer
By Judith Blake
Seattle Times staff reporter

It's been 40 years since a small group of grieving but resolute parents in Washington banded together to fight sudden infant death syndrome, yet SIDS remains in some ways a mystery, its cause unknown.
Even so, partly through their work and that of many others, death rates from SIDS have fallen dramatically since then, and scientists are learning more every day about ways to thwart this cruel killer of sleeping babies.
"We don't know the cause or causes of SIDS, but we have learned a great deal about factors that enhance risk," said Dr. Abraham Bergman, director of pediatrics at Harborview Medical Center and an early SIDS researcher.
A campaign urging parents to put their infants to sleep on their backs gets overwhelming credit from most experts for the reduced incidence of SIDS. After stomach-sleeping, many scientists now rank parents' smoking as the No. 2 risk factor."

http://seattletimes.nwsource.com/html/healthscience/134359100_sids29.html


ASST. MANAGER, TOPGUN'S FRIENDLY SKIES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, MEDICAL FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, PERSONAL LAW FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, SOUTHERN STATES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, WISHING WELL
 
"Some people come into our lives and quietly go. Others stay for awhile and leave footprints on our hearts and we are never the same."
Click for Bryson City, North Carolina Forecast
 

 
From: Debby (DEBBIE2476) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by host12/14/01 11:31 AM 
To: All  (6 of 38) 
 12539.6 in reply to 12539.5 
* Cot death families plead for support *
Parents of cot death babies are calling for a shake-up in the
"inadequate" response they receive after the tragedy.
Full story: (BBC: December 14, 2001)
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/em/-/hi/english/health/newsid_1709000/1709568.stm

 

ASST. MANAGER, TOPGUN'S FRIENDLY SKIES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, MEDICAL FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, PERSONAL LAW FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, SOUTHERN STATES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, WISHING WELL
 
"Some people come into our lives and quietly go. Others stay for awhile and leave footprints on our hearts and we are never the same."
Click for Bryson City, North Carolina Forecast
 

 
From: Debby (DEBBIE2476) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by host1/6/02 12:09 PM 
To: All  (7 of 38) 
 12539.7 in reply to 12539.6 
American Physiological Society (APS)
4-Jan-02

Possible Clues for Avoiding Sudden Infant Death Syndrome

 

 

 NEW RESEARCH FINDINGS OFFERS POSSIBLE CLUES FOR AVOIDING SUDDEN INFANT DEATH SYNDROME (SIDS)

Hypoxemia, rather than hypercarbia, may be the more important factor when death occurs in infants sleeping with their faces covered by soft porous bedding.

January 3, 2002 -- Bethesda, MD -- The incidence of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) has decreased markedly over the past decade since recommendations were made in several countries to place infants in a nonprone position when sleeping. However, SIDS remains the leading cause of infant death beyond the neonatal period in the United States, and 20 percent of US infants continue to sleep prone. Despite the established increased risk of SIDS with prone sleep, the cause of death is still under debate. One proposed reason for infant mortality is that when an infant sleeps sleeping facedown, "rebreathing" of expired air caught in the soft porous bedding occurs.

Background
The rebreathing theory has been criticized because, although increased CO2 is biologically significant, this condition is unlikely to cause nonspecific reversible depression of neuronal excitability or rapid death. Another condition, hypoxemia (subnormal oxygenation of arterial blood) has been noted in animal models of rebreathing; however, no direct measurements of environmental oxygen (O2) in animal or human models have been made. O2 content of inspired air during rebreathing has been assumed to reciprocate CO2 levels, such that inspired O2 = room air O2 minus end-inspiration CO2. The effects of factors such as the respiratory exchange ratio on CO2 and O2 are unknown.

The observations found in previous studies suggest that complex interactions of several factors influencing gas exchange between infant and environment may influence the degree of hypercarbia and hypoxia that develop in inspired air. To further explore the consequences of infants sleeping facedown on soft bedding, a team of researchers evaluated four aspects of gas exchange: (1) infants' gas exchange with the external environment through air-channel formation in bedding, (2) infants' gas exchange with the bedding as affected by gas gradients, (3) infants' ventilatory responses to hypercapnia and hypoxia during rebreathing and gas exchanging efficiency of different respiratory patterns, and (4) direct measurement of CO2 and O2 in the rebreathing environment during periods of rapid and slow change in the gas concentration of inspired air.

The authors of the study, "Inspired CO2 and O2 in Sleeping Infants Rebreathing From Bedding: Relevance for Sudden Infant Death Syndrome," are Aloka L. Patel, Kathy Harris, and Bradley T. Thach, all from the Edward Mallinckrodt Department of Pediatrics, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO. The study is being published in the December, 2001 edition of the Journal of Applied Physiology.

Methodology
Twenty-one healthy infants younger than six months old from the St. Louis community were enrolled between September and November 1999. The subjects were five-24 weeks old. There were eight males and 13 females. Nineteen of the 21 were born at term. At home, four 4 (19 percent) slept prone or face down, four (19 percent) slept supine (face up) or on the side, and 13 (62 percent) slept supine. Seventeen infants (81 percent) received routine periods of prone positioning while awake and supervised.

Infants were studied during natural sleep during a morning or afternoon nap after a feeding. They were placed in a plastic crib. Bedding used in this study consisted of a corrugated foam pad covered by a polyester-filled comforter folded double (thickness of doubled comforter = 3 cm). A shallow depression (12.5 +- 12.5 cm at surface, 4.5 cm deep) was cut into the foam mattress directly beneath the infant's head.

The research team measured gas exchange with the environment and bedding, ventilatory response to rebreathing, and concentrations of inspired CO2 and O2. Two important factors influencing inspired gas concentrations were (1) a variable seal between bedding and infants' faces and (2) gas gradients in the bedding beneath the infants, with O2-poor and CO2-rich air nearest to the face, fresher air distal to the face, and larger tidal volumes being associated with fresher inspired air.

During the study, it became evident that gas concentrations in bedding during rebreathing are influenced by a number of factors. To estimate the rate of flow out of the bedding, five percent CO2, 13 percent O2, and balance N2 was introduced into the bedding until it was saturated. A water-filled container with a shape and mass approximating that of an infant's head was placed over the sampling catheter. Half-lives for decrease in CO2 and increase in O2 were measured during continuous sampling, as in the infant studies.

Next, the rate of CO2 flow into the bedding was estimated by determining the maximum rates of rise of CO2 when infants first assumed the facedown position. Half-life was calculated for this rate of rise. Knowing the rates of flow into and out of the bedding allowed the researchers to mathematically determine the differences in gas concentration in the bedding for continuous vs. intermittent sampling.

Results
Preliminary data revealed that there are often air channels around the infant's face, while sleeping facedown, which allow gas exchange with the environment and that they are hidden, since direct inspection does not suggest their presence. In addition, it was noted that slight movements of the infant's head could increase or decrease flow through these channels. This principle was also demonstrated by the significant rise in CO2 after the placement of cloths near infants' faces, thus increasing the bedding's effect on rebreathing.

When the infant has the ability to exchange air via air channels, the degree of rebreathing may be limited. However, this also highlights the subtleties of infant and bedding positioning, which are not immediately visible, these subtleties may explain why some infants can sleep facedown, whereas others who do so may experience dangerous asphyxia.

Conclusions
Two important factors influencing inspired gas concentrations were (1) a variable seal between bedding and infants' faces and (2) gas gradients in the bedding beneath the infants, with O2-poor and CO2-rich air nearest to the face, fresher air distal to the face, and larger tidal volumes being associated with fresher inspired air. Minute ventilation increased significantly during rebreathing because of an increase in tidal volume, not frequency. The measured drop in inspired O2 was significantly greater than the accompanying rise in inspired CO2. This appears to be due to effects of the respiratory exchange ratio and differential tissue solubilities of CO2 and O2 during unsteady conditions.

These findings further advance the concept that hypoxemia, rather than hypercarbia, may be the more important factor when death occurs in infants sleeping with their faces covered by soft porous bedding.

Source
December 2001 edition of the Journal of Applied Physiology.


ASST. MANAGER, TOPGUN'S FRIENDLY SKIES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, MEDICAL FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, PERSONAL LAW FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, SOUTHERN STATES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, WISHING WELL
 
"Some people come into our lives and quietly go. Others stay for awhile and leave footprints on our hearts and we are never the same."
Click for Bryson City, North Carolina Forecast
 

 
From: Debby (DEBBIE2476) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by host1/22/02 11:09 PM 
To: All  (8 of 38) 
 12539.8 in reply to 12539.7 
Babies' Sighs During Sleep 'Reset' Nervous System (details, click here)
Reuters: Jan 22, 5:21 PM ET
Parents who hear their sleeping infants sigh from time to time should be reassured, not alarmed. Sighs are an indication of healthy sleep and sometimes serve as an important survival mechanism, Belgian researchers reported here Friday at a pediatric sleep meeting.

ASST. MANAGER, TOPGUN'S FRIENDLY SKIES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, MEDICAL FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, PERSONAL LAW FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, SOUTHERN STATES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, WISHING WELL
 
"Some people come into our lives and quietly go. Others stay for awhile and leave footprints on our hearts and we are never the same."
Click for Bryson City, North Carolina Forecast
 

 
From: Debby (DEBBIE2476) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by host3/30/02 1:06 AM 
To: All  (9 of 38) 
 12539.9 in reply to 12539.8 
Study Supports Link Between SIDS and Smoking (details, click here)
Fri Mar 29, 5:49 PM ET - (Reuters)
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - In findings that reinforce the recommendation that new parents quit smoking, researchers report that children who die of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) have higher concentrations of nicotine in their lungs than children who die of other causes.

ASST. MANAGER, TOPGUN'S FRIENDLY SKIES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, MEDICAL FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, PERSONAL LAW FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, SOUTHERN STATES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, WISHING WELL
 
"Some people come into our lives and quietly go. Others stay for awhile and leave footprints on our hearts and we are never the same."
 
09-11-01

 
 

 
From: Debby (DEBBIE2476) DelphiPlus Member Icon Posted by host4/26/02 2:48 AM 
To: All  (10 of 38) 
 12539.10 in reply to 12539.9 
SIDS May Be Linked to Infection (details, click here)
(AP) Thu Apr 25, 3:03 PM ET
Sudden Infant Death Syndrome, in which apparently healthy babies die inexplicably in their cribs, may be linked to infection with a common bacterium, preliminary research suggests.

ASST. MANAGER, TOPGUN'S FRIENDLY SKIES FORUM
CHIEF ASST. MANAGER, MEDICAL FORUM
CHIEF ASST. MANAGER, PERSONAL LAW FORUM
CHIEF ASST. MANAGER, SOUTHERN STATES FORUM
ASST. MANAGER, WISHING WELL   
 
"Some people come into our lives and quietly go. Others stay for awhile and leave footprints on our hearts and we are never the same."
 
                    
 

 
Navigate this discussion: 1-10 11-20 21-30 31-38
Adjust text size:
Using a mobile device? Switch to the Mobile Site.

Welcome, guest! Get more out of Delphi Forums by logging in.

New to Delphi Forums? You can log in with your Facebook, Twitter, or Google account or use the New Member Login option and log in with any email address.

Home | Help | Forums | Chat | Blogs | Advertising | Membership Plans
© Delphi Forums LLC All rights reserved. Privacy Policy. Terms of Service.