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Books - what are you reading?   Fletcher's Tea Room and Bar

Started 5/10/18 by LvlSlgr; 42112 views.
CzoeMC

From: CzoeMC

Jul-21

I finished reading ALL of Jane Austin's books, in a row, a few months ago, which explains my antiquated speech pattern lately.

Now am back to reading sf, fantasy, and Scandinavian detective/police mysteries, the Finnish writers (who have been translated) are quite compelling. Of course the Amsterdam and Swedish cops all have exciting crimes to solve. Funny, that they have less crime there, but the stories are so remarkable in that the vivid descriptions can bring one to a place never visited.

LvlSlgr

From: LvlSlgr

Jul-21

CzoeMC said:

I finished reading ALL of Jane Austin's books, in a row

That's quite an accomplishment! A few years back I reread "Pride and Prejudice" and "Sense and Sensibility" but that's all I've ever read of hers. Have fun with your Scandinavian detective/police mysteries.

CzoeMC

From: CzoeMC

Jul-22

Had read both those before, and was delighted by the others that I hadn't read. "Lady Susan" is quite scandalous and funny, (Austin's last one), a series of letters that.... well, won't divulge anymore.

Almost makes one wonder how the whole drama would have transpired in the internet age, rather than waiting for letters by post.

  • Edited July 22, 2019 12:59 am  by  CzoeMC
LvlSlgr

From: LvlSlgr

Jul-22

CzoeMC said:

Almost makes one wonder how the whole drama would have transpired in the internet age, rather than waiting for letters by post.

You're absolutely right!

I think I mentioned earlier that I read a book called "First Mothers" about the mothers of 11 of the modern US Presidents - Franklin Roosevelt through Bill Clinton. All of these men were very close to their mothers and most wrote letters to their mothers throughout their lives. And, as we all know, this is how we have learned so much about the lives of so many historical figures ... through their letters. However, in this book it became evident the more modern we became that these men (Presidents) weren't writing letters anymore. Why? Because it became easier to pick up a phone and call. So we have most likely missed out on a lot of information because of technology.

Nona (Waldmeister)

From: Nona (Waldmeister)

Jul-22

LvlSlgr said:

However, in this book it became evident the more modern we became that these men (Presidents) weren't writing letters anymore. Why? Because it became easier to pick up a phone and call. So we have most likely missed out on a lot of information because of technology.

Don't worry - with the digital age and various commercial and state entities into obsessive data collection there will be a deluge of data once they choose to release it. I suppose the NSA could provide enough material to dwarf the Encyclopaedia Brittanica.

CzoeMC

From: CzoeMC

Jul-22

Funny!  BEWARE thou users of the internets, a mighty sword is posed most heftily over thine necks, if you perchance to be careless and naughty, the truth may be exposed, to your utter dismay...

LvlSlgr

From: LvlSlgr

Aug-4

Well, I'm finally on the third book of the Natchez Burning trilogy. This is the trilogy where each book is about 800 pages. I read the first book "Natchez Burning" back in June of last year. I was able to get the third book "Mississippi Blood" shortly after that at a reasonable price, but I couldn't continue until I found the second book "The Bone Tree". I finally got that one in January and read it. So now I've started "Mississippi Blood".

After I finish this one it's time to read some non-fiction. Either a biography or something historical. The last 5 (make that 6 with what I'm reading now) have been fiction.

KNIMtheTOAD

From: KNIMtheTOAD

Aug-4

I've listened to Natchez Burning (audio book) in two days. They don't have the other 2 at the library yet. Am now Listening to "Becoming" by Michelle Obama. Very good and read by author. Audio books are my go to now. Listened to 5 books in 3 days. Started 2 more that the readers voice was so high and squeaky the cats ran out of the room. Reread 3 Tony Hillerman. Love his books.

I want something that is sweet or funny.  Any advice?

TOAD/Otter/MOUSE

LvlSlgr

From: LvlSlgr

Aug-4

KNIMtheTOAD said:

the readers voice was so high and squeaky the cats ran out of the room

That's hilarious!

Boy! I wish I had something sweet or funny to recommend. That's usually what I'm asking my friends because I read so many mystery/suspense books or serious historical books there are really times when I just want something light and funny. I just looked back at my "Read" books on goodreads.com and the last time I read something that even remotely falls into that category was in April. It was Penny Marshall's autobiography "My Mother Was Nuts". Sure it's a biography but I find comedians tend to not be quite so serious when they write their own biographies. Maybe there were hard times but they can get the point across with a little humor.

I don't know if you've ever read any of the Stephanie Plum books by Janet Evanovich, but I recommend those also. Even though Stephanie is a bail bond enforcement officer (in other words, bounty hunter) the books can be hilarious. I mean for me there truly are laugh-out-loud moments in each book.

Nona (Waldmeister)

From: Nona (Waldmeister)

Aug-5

KNIMtheTOAD said:

...the readers voice was so high and squeaky the cats ran out of the room.

I want something that is sweet or funny.  Any advice?

Our local tram/underground has a voice that annonces the stations. When some of the big fares take place which attract lots of international visitors they run additional announcements in English. (Where to change trains, how to get to the fair ground, main station, airport, beware of pickpockets.) They originally employed a female who's voice was really high and squeaky as well, especially for German ears where females usually speak in a much deeper voice than those from the Anglosphere. People held their ears when approaching an innercity station. After loads of complaints the operators changed to a male announcer - to everybody's relief.

Have you tried Michael Caine's autobiography "What's it all about"? It is full of small bite sized stories, most of them funny and interesting and some of them sweet as well.

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