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Alpha Game 153 - Name that Tune   Fun and Games

Started 5/11/18 by Jenifer (Zarknorph); 2422559 views.
LvlSlgr

From: LvlSlgr

Sep-26

Casement - is a window that is attached to its frame by one or more hinges at the side. They are used singly or in pairs within a common frame, in which case they are hinged on the outside. Casement windows are often held open using a casement stay. Casement windows "generally have lower air leakage rates than sliding windows because the sash closes by pressing against the frame." Casement windows are also excellent for natural ventilation strategies, especially in hot climates. Casements allow more control of ventilation than flush-opening windows. They can be hinged to open outward and angled in order to direct breezes into the building.

PTG (anotherPTG)

From: PTG (anotherPTG)

Sep-26

Deal Castle Kent England

File:Deal Castle (1).jpg

Egyptian Revival (is an architectural style that uses the motifs and imagery of ancient Egypt. It is attributed generally to the public awareness of ancient Egyptian monuments generated by Napoleon's conquest of Egypt and Admiral Nelson's defeat of the French Navy at the Battle of the Nile in 1798. Napoleon took a scientific expedition with him to Egypt. Publication of the expedition's work, the Description de l'Égypte, began in 1809 and was published as a series through 1826. The size and monumentality of the façades "discovered" during his adventure cemented the hold of Egyptian aesthetics on the Parisian elite. However, works of art and architecture in the Egyptian style had been made or built occasionally on the European continent and the British Isles since the time of the Renaissance)

Calling it a night.........................

LvlSlgr

From: LvlSlgr

Sep-27

Flamboyant - is an ornate architectural style that was developed in Europe in the Late Middle Ages and Renaissance, from around 1375 to the mid-16th century. A form of late Gothic architecture, it is characterized by double curves forming flame-like shapes in the bar-tracery, which give the style its name. Flamboyant tracery is recognizable for its flowing forms, which are influenced by the earlier curvilinear tracery of the Second Gothic (or Second Pointed) styles. Very tall and narrow pointed arches and gables, particularly double-curved ogee arches, are common in buildings of the Flamboyant style. Notable examples of Flamboyant style are the west rose window of Sainte-Chapelle (1485-1498); the west porch of the Church of Saint-Maclou, Rouen, (c.1500–14); the west front of Troyes Cathedral; and the Great West Window of York Minster. Further major examples include the chapel of the Constable of Castile (Spanish: Capilla del Condestable) at Burgos Cathedral (1482–94); Notre-Dame de l'Épine, Champagne; the north spire of Chartres Cathedral (1500s–); and Segovia Cathedral (1525–).

Great West Window, York Minster (1338)

  

Notre-Dame de l'Épine, west front (1405-1527)

  • Edited September 27, 2020 12:48 pm  by  LvlSlgr

Green Roof (or living roof is a roof of a building that is partially or completely covered with vegetation and a growing medium, planted over a waterproofing membrane. It may also include additional layers such as a root barrier and drainage and irrigation systems. Container gardens on roofs, where plants are maintained in pots, are not generally considered to be true green roofs, although this is debated. Rooftop ponds are another form of green roofs which are used to treat greywater. Vegetation, soil, drainage layer, roof barrier and irrigation system constitute green roof)

PTG (anotherPTG)

From: PTG (anotherPTG)

Sep-27

A hyphen is a connecting link between two larger building elements. It is typically found in Palladian architecture, where the hyphens form connections between a large corps de logis and terminating pavilions.

Addition added using a "hyphen" | House styles, Historic buildings, Mansions

Imperial Roof Decoration (or roof charms or roof-figures or "walking beasts" or "crouching beasts" were statuettes placed along the ridge line of official buildings of the Chinese empire. Only official buildings were permitted to use such roof decorations. Chinese roofs are typically of the hip roof type, with small gables, so decorations along the ridge line were highly visible to observers. Variant versions are still widespread in Chinese temples and has spread to the rest of East Asia and parts of Southeast Asia)

Off to work........................

LvlSlgr

From: LvlSlgr

Sep-27

Jagati - In Hindu temple architecture, the jagati is the raised surface of the platform or terrace upon which some Buddhist or Hindu temples are built. This feature is seen in temples such as the temples of Khajuraho. The jagati lies on a platform or base called adhi??hana (among other terms from various languages) which adds to its height. The sides of the adhishthana are often ornamented with relief sculptures, or deep-cut mouldings. The jagati also allows for ritual circumambulation, i.e. the walking of devotees around the shrine, which is important in both Buddhism and Hinduism.

PTG (anotherPTG)

From: PTG (anotherPTG)

Sep-27

A keystone (or capstone) is the wedge-shaped stone at the apex of a masonry arch or typically round-shaped one at the apex of a vault. In both cases it is the final piece placed during construction and locks all the stones into position, allowing the arch or vault to bear weight.

Keystone (architecture) - Wikipedia

Fountain Arch Keystone - Free photo on Pixabay

LvlSlgr

From: LvlSlgr

Sep-27

Thomas White Lamb - was an American architect, born in Scotland. He is noted as one of the foremost designers of theaters and cinemas in the 20th century. Among his most noted designs that have been preserved and restored are the B.F. Keith Memorial Theatre in Boston (1928) (now the Boston Opera House), Warner's Hollywood Theatre (1930) in New York (now the Times Square Church), the Hippodrome Theatre (1914) in Baltimore, and the Loew's Ohio Theatre (1928) in Columbus, Ohio. Aside from movie theaters, Lamb is noted for designing (with Joseph Urban) New York's Ziegfeld Theatre, a legitimate theater, as well as the third Madison Square Garden and the Paramount Hotel in midtown Manhattan.

B.F. Keith Memorial Theatre in Boston

 Interior of the United Palace Theater (2007) (formerly Loews' NYC)

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