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Alpha Game 155 Ecosystems and contents   Fun and Games

Started 5/11/18 by Jenifer (Zarknorph); 2641014 views.

Remake (refers to a later production (of a previous film), with different credits, script, and cast; a redone, second version of a film's narrative and subject matter; remakes have been common throughout all of film history. Examples: The Jazz Singer (1927) remade in the 50s as The Jazz Singer (1953) with Danny Thomas, and in the early 1980s as The Jazz Singer (1980) with Neil Diamond; also What Price Hollywood? (1932) became A Star is Born (1937) - with Janet Gaynor, and A Star is Born (1954) - with Judy Garland, and A Star is Born (1976) with Barbra Streisand; and the unnecessary, meticulous shot-by-shot remake of Psycho (1960) by Gus Van Sant in 1998)

LvlSlgr

From: LvlSlgr

Oct-17

Slow motion - is an effect in film-making whereby time appears to be slowed down. It was invented by the Austrian priest August Musger in the early 20th century. This can be accomplished through the use of high-speed cameras and then playing the footage produced by such cameras at a normal rate like 30 fps, or in post production through the use of software add-ons. Slow motion is ubiquitous in modern filmmaking. It is used by a diverse range of directors to achieve diverse effects. Some classic subjects of slow-motion include:

  • Athletic activities of all kinds, to demonstrate skill and style.
  • To recapture a key moment in an athletic game, typically shown as a replay.
  • Natural phenomena, such as a drop of water hitting a glass.

3-D Movies (are motion pictures made to give an illusion of three-dimensional solidity, usually with the help of special viewing devices. They have existed in some form since 1915, but had been largely relegated to a niche in the motion picture industry because of the costly hardware and processes required to produce and display a 3D film, and the lack of a standardized format for all segments of the entertainment business. Nonetheless, 3D films were prominently featured in the 1950s in American cinema, and later experienced a worldwide resurgence in the 1980s and 1990s driven by IMAX high-end theaters and Disney-themed venues. 3D films became increasingly successful throughout the 2000s, peaking with the success of 3D presentations of Avatar in December 2009, after which 3D films again decreased in popularity. Certain directors have also taken more experimental approaches to 3D filmmaking, most notably celebrated auteur Jean-Luc Godard in his film 3x3D)

One of the worst ones to watch on regular TV............................

Not sure the glasses are "super-cool"............................

LvlSlgr

From: LvlSlgr

Oct-18

Uma Thurman - is an American actress and model. She has performed in a variety of films, from romantic comedies and dramas to science fiction and action films. Thurman starred in Dangerous Liaisons (1988). She rose to international prominence with her performance as Mia Wallace in Quentin Tarantino's 1994 film Pulp Fiction, for which she was nominated for the Academy Award, the BAFTA Award, and the Golden Globe Award for Best Supporting Actress. Often hailed as Tarantino's muse, she reunited with the director to play the main role in Kill Bill: Volume 1 and 2 (2003, 2004), which brought her two additional Golden Globe Award nominations.

Pulp Fiction (1994) poster.jpg

  • Edited October 18, 2020 12:13 am  by  LvlSlgr

Venice Film Festival (or Venice International Film Festival (Italian: Mostra Internazionale d'Arte Cinematografica della Biennale di Venezia, "International Exhibition of Cinematographic Art of the Venice Biennale") is the world's oldest film festival and one of the "Big Three" film festivals, alongside the Cannes Film Festival in France and the Berlin International Film Festival in Germany. The Big Three are internationally acclaimed for giving creators the artistic freedom to express themselves through film)

The top award, the Golden Lion......................

A barrier built in compliance with the safety directions to enforce social distancing blocks the main red carpet during the Festival this year.............

LvlSlgr

From: LvlSlgr

Oct-18

Orson Welles - was an American actor, director, writer and producer who is remembered for his innovative work in radio, theater and film. He is considered one of the greatest filmmakers of all time. His first film was Citizen Kane (1941), which is consistently ranked as the greatest film ever made, and which he co-wrote, produced, directed and starred in as Charles Foster Kane. Welles released twelve other features, the most acclaimed of which include The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), The Lady from Shanghai (1947), Touch of Evil (1958), The Trial (1962), Chimes at Midnight (1965) and F for Fake (1973). His distinctive directorial style featured layered and nonlinear narrative forms, uses of lighting such as chiaroscuro, unusual camera angles, sound techniques borrowed from radio, deep focus shots and long takes.

Welles at work on the set of The Magnificent Ambersons (1942)

Welles in F for Fake (1974), a film essay and the last film he completed.

  • Edited October 18, 2020 12:46 am  by  LvlSlgr

Wang Xiaoshuai (is a Chinese film director, screenwriter and occasional actor. He is commonly grouped under the loose association of filmmakers known as the "Sixth Generation" of the Cinema of China.. Like others in this generation, and in contrast with earlier Chinese filmmakers who produced mostly historical drama, Wang proposed a “new urban Chinese cinema has been mainly concerned with bearing witness of a fast- paced transforming China and producing a localized critique of globalization.”)

LvlSlgr

From: LvlSlgr

Oct-18

Gig Young  - was an American actor. He was thrice nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor for his performances in Come Fill the Cup (1952), Teacher's Pet (1959), and They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969), winning for the last of these. Born Byron Elsworth Barr (November 4, 1913), his stage/professional name was from the character he played in his first notable role in the feature film The Gay Sisters (1942) named "Gig Young". Preview cards praised the actor "Gig Young" and the studio determined that "Gig Young" should become Barr's stage and professional name.

1953

They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (1969)

Last one

Good night...................

Zoopraxiscope ((initially named zoographiscope and zoogyroscope) is an early device for displaying moving images and is considered an important predecessor of the movie projector. It was conceived by photographic pioneer Eadweard Muybridge in 1879 (and built for him by January 1880 to project his famous chronophotographic pictures in motion and thus prove that these were authentic). Muybridge used the projector in his public lectures from 1880 to 1895. The projector used 16" glass disks onto which Muybridge had an unidentified artist paint the sequences as silhouettes. This technique eliminated the backgrounds and enabled the creation of fanciful combinations and additional imaginary elements. Only one disk used photographic images, of a horse skeleton posed in different positions. A later series of 12" discs, made in 1892–1894, used outlines drawn by Erwin F. Faber that were printed onto the discs photographically, then colored by hand. These colored discs were probably never used in Muybridge's lectures. All images of the known 71 disks, including those of the photographic disk, were rendered in elongated form to compensate the distortion of the projection. The projector was related to other projecting phenakistiscopes and used some slotted metal shutter discs that were interchangeable for different picture disks or different effects on the screen. The machine was hand-cranked)

See the source image

Calling it a night...............................

PTG (anotherPTG)

From: PTG (anotherPTG)

Oct-18

Animation film crews have many of the same roles and departments as live-action films (including directing, production, editing, camera, sound, etc.), but nearly all on-set departments (lighting, electrical, grip, sets, props, costume, hair, makeup, special effects, and stunts) were traditionally replaced with a single animation department made up of various types of animators (character, effects, in-betweeners, cleanup, etc.)

animation Archives | GROUNDBREAK

The Advanced Art of Stop-Motion Animation': History of Stop-Motion Feature  Films: Part 2 | Animation World Network

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