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Jewish Living & Holidays -  The Coronavirus & The Jews (2606 views) Notify me whenever anyone posts in this discussion.Subscribe
 
From: WEBELIAHU DelphiPlus Member Icon3/18/20 7:41 AM 
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 10373.29 in reply to 10373.20 

March 18, 2020

         "An app to notify users if they have been in proximity of an infected patient was launched on Saturday by the United Hatzalah EMS organization...As the number of coronavirus patients rises, it becomes harder for the public to keep track of all the different places that they have all been along with the updates from the Health Ministry,” Dov Maisel, United Hatzalah vice president of operations, said. “Additionally, people often have a hard time recalling exactly where they have been and when. The app solves both of these problems.”

https://www.jpost.com/Israel-News/New-Israeli-app-to-notify-users-of-potential-coronavirus-exposure-620991

New Israeli apps to make life easier during the coronavirus outbreak

The tracking app is already available on Android and will soon be rolled out for iPhones. However, it does not work retroactively, so it is important that users download it as soon as possible.

On Saturday night, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu announced measures that Israel would implement to contain the coronavirus outbreak. Among other things, he said the authorities would employ intelligence tracking tools to digitally monitor coronavirus patients through their smartphones to see where they were before discovering that they were infected and to take appropriate steps.
 
As the crisis intensifies all over the world, technology represents a key to fighting back – and not only for medical-related issues. As the public finds itself grappling with several questions – from how to figure out whether people had potential exchanges with others who tested positive, to what to do with children stuck at home all day with schools closed – some answers are offered by a wide range of smartphone applications.
 
One first virtual response to the crisis came from the Health Ministry. Since the beginning of the month, the ministry has been offering on its website a virtual map, constantly updated with the new coronavirus cases reported in the country, including the movements of the infected people on the relevant days, listing stores and sites visited by them, as well as flights taken. A few days later, it launched CoronApp, available on both Android-operated smartphones and iPhones, to provide users with direct information about the virus and share relevant advice for those in self-quarantine.
 
"Digital tools are an integral part of the ability to cope with the outbreak of the virus in Israel," Esti Shelly, digital health manager at the ministry, told Ynet. "We are working to collaborate with the strong ecosystem of digital healthcare companies that exists in Israel."
 
Moreover, the ministry set up a group to send updates about the situation on Telegram that has more than 93,000 users. According to Walla, a similar group was also launched on WhatsApp, one of the most popular apps in the country.
 
An app to notify users if they have been in proximity of an infected patient was launched on Saturday by the United Hatzalah EMS organization. Already available on Google Play Store and soon to be released on Apple's App Store, from the moment it is downloaded, the app keeps track of the users’ movements, and can therefore notify them if it emerges that they have come in contact with someone diagnosed with the virus whose itineraries are later shared by the Health Ministry. The app, called “Track Virus,” cross-checks the movements, and, if necessary, sends a notification. It cannot therefore cover the movements of users or patients that had occurred before it is downloaded. Moreover, the information is stored in the app anonymously and not shared in the cloud system, to protect users' privacy.
 
“As the number of coronavirus patients rises, it becomes harder for the public to keep track of all the different places that they have all been along with the updates from the Health Ministry,” Dov Maisel, United Hatzalah vice president of operations, said. “Additionally, people often have a hard time recalling exactly where they have been and when. The app solves both of these problems.”
 
Starting on Sunday, tens of thousands of users will receive the necessary information regarding the whereabouts of confirmed coronavirus carriers faster, in a more up-to-date manner and with more accuracy, the creator of Track Virus, Uri Feldman, said.
 
“We are very excited that a large organization such as United Hatzalah has partnered with us in tracking and hopefully stopping the spread of the coronavirus by using advanced smartphone technology.”
 
As tens of thousands of people are stuck at home, having groceries delivered might also represent an essential need. Many large supermarket chains offer delivery through apps.
 
Finally, after the announcement that schools would shut down until at least after Passover, a pressing issue for many is how to entertain children at home. While experts recommend that people stay physically active, a certain amount of time spent on smartphones and TV are likely unavoidable.
 
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From: WEBELIAHU DelphiPlus Member Icon3/18/20 7:42 AM 
To: All  (30 of 173) 
 10373.30 in reply to 10373.29 

March 18, 2020

        "As part of its efforts to contain the disease, the government has advised those who are concerned about having contracted coronavirus to call 101 and talk to an emergency responder at MDA, rather than take themselves to a medical establishment and risk infecting others."

https://www.jpost.com/Israel-News/Magen-David-Adom-answers-most-commonly-asked-questions-on-coronavirus-621039

This is what Magen David Adom wants you to know about coronavirus

MDA has tripled its call-taking capacity – after receiving 48,000 calls on Wednesday – to deal with coronavirus queries, but more general queries can be addressed via the website.

Experts at Magen David Adom released a set of the most commonly asked questions regarding COVID-19 and the precautions being taken to prevent its spread, as Israel moves to deal with the pandemic. As of Sunday, 200 Israelis tested positive for the virus, of which 157 were hospitalized. Just two are in a serious condition.

Nevertheless, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has told the country: "We must do everything, as a government and as citizens, to not become infected and not to infect others,” as his interim government rolled out a series of measures. As part of its efforts to contain the disease, the government has advised those who are concerned about having contracted coronavirus to call 101 and talk to an emergency responder at MDA, rather than take themselves to a medical establishment and risk infecting others. On Wednesday, MDA received more than 48,000 calls. It has since more than tripled its call-response capabilities to cope with the extra load.

MDA published its answers to some coronavirus FAQs:

I landed in Israel from abroad today, but I'm feeling good. Do I need to go into isolation?

Yes. The Health Ministry orders that you must stay quarantined for 14 days, beginning from the day of departure from the country – in this case Spain. The virus incubation period is 14 days, so it is important to complete the entire isolation period and prevent the risk of exposure and infection of others.

My husband returned from abroad today and was sent to isolation, what to do with the other tenants?

The person quarantined must follow the isolation guidelines. The rest of the people who came in contact with your husband are not required to take any special action, and they can continue their daily routine. Quarantined people who develop symptoms such as fever / cough / sore throat / shortness of breath should contact MDA immediately by dialing 101.

My husband returned from abroad today and was sent to isolation, what should he do?

Those quarantined must remain in a secluded and ventilated room for a full 14 days from the date of exposure, and be careful to use a separate toilet and utensils whenever possible. At every exit from the room he must wear a mouth-nose mask (or other cloth) and gloves. The toilets and places touched / used should be disinfected, and all household members should be careful to wash their hands with soap and water frequently. Full guidelines on home isolation can be found on the Ministry of Health's website. A "home isolation" report form must also be completed on the website.

I've been in isolation for a week now and feel good. Does that mean I'm healthy and can leave home?

Definitely not. The virus incubation period is 14 days, so it is important to complete the entire isolation period and avoid the risk of exposure and infection of others.

I returned from abroad two weeks ago and I am at the 14th day for "isolation." Today I developed a fever. What should I do?

Fever above 38 degrees is considered one of the symptoms of the coronavirus. To rule out infection, you must call MDA's 101 Emergency Call Center, and if necessary, the MDA team will come to you for sampling and testing. You must remain in isolation and prevent the infection of others.

Before going into isolation, I met with lots of friends and family. Do they also need to go into isolation?

They are considered a second circuit, for which there are no specific prohibitions. However, if you have the virus symptoms; (fever, cough, sore throat and shortness of breath), you should report to MDA's 101 Emergency Call Center as soon as possible.

I've heard that the virus mainly affects elders. Does that mean I shouldn't visit my parents?

Elders and chronically ill people are indeed at risk. However, a healthy person who is not quarantined has no impediment to visiting older people.

A student in my son's school is infected with coronavirus, and now the whole school has been sent to isolation. Does that mean my child is ill?

No. He must remain in isolation for a full 14 days, and you must monitor his medical condition. If fever / cough / sore throat / shortness of breath symptoms appear, contact MDA's 101 Emergency Call Center.

I've heard that children do not contract the disease, so isolation is not required. Is this true?

No. Although, according to data available today, the rate of illness seems to be lower in children, unnecessary risks should not be taken.

 

 
From: WEBELIAHU DelphiPlus Member Icon3/18/20 7:52 AM 
To: All  (31 of 173) 
 10373.31 in reply to 10373.30 

March 18, 2020

        "Some cafes and restaurants shut their doors prior to the announcement, and many are unlikely to open after the outbreak...For employees lacking job security and the state, the true financial impact of the outbreak is unlikely to be known for some time."

https://www.jpost.com/HEALTH-SCIENCE/Coronavirus-containment-measures-exact-increasingly-costly-toll-620976

Coronavirus containment measures exact increasingly costly toll

Despite rumors of wide-ranging shutdowns of the Israeli economy, the Finance Ministry announced limits primarily affecting leisure-related businesses including restaurants, theaters and gyms.

Major public health decisions necessarily come with a heavy economic price. Measures to contain the outbreak of the novel coronavirus are exacting an increasingly costly toll. Despite rumors of wide-ranging shutdowns of the Israeli economy, Finance Ministry director-general Shai Babad announced limits primarily affecting leisure-related businesses including restaurants, theaters and gyms. More severe measures are expected in the coming days.

Those expected to be hit hardest by the new measures are thousands of workers on zero-hour contracts, who may not be eligible for benefits from the National Insurance Institute (Bituach Leumi), and parents of preschoolers who will now need to remain at home. For the foreseeable future, employers will be required to implement measures enabling employees to work from the comfort of their own home, despite the inevitable decrease in efficiency.

While compensating for the economic damage caused by the new measures will require large sums, Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu lamented constraints derived from the current political situation. Some cafes and restaurants shut their doors prior to the announcement, and many are unlikely to open after the outbreak.

As alluded by Finance Minister Moshe Kahlon last week, additional funds will likely be needed by the National Insurance Institute to meet the anticipated increase in claims for compensation. Much of the Saturday night press conference was dedicated to allaying customer fears. Babad emphasized that Israel has supplies of food and pharmaceuticals that can last for months, calling on the public to refrain from panic-buying in supermarkets.

"We are not intending to shut the private sector," said Babad. "We are requesting that all the chief executives of companies try to let employees work from home, to reduce gatherings at places of work and to implement a two-meter rule between workers."

Even prior to Netanyahu's announcement, amid fears of a possible bank run, the Bank of Israel moved to allay customer concerns.

"The banking system is ready to continue to maintain the cash machines and no shortage of cash is expected," the central bank said in a statement. "The Bank of Israel is ensuring that, under every measure, bank cash machines will work as usual."

Leaders of the Histadrut labor federation and unions representing workers across industries met following the announcement to develop practical measures to support the economy during the coming weeks.

"We need to know not just how to proceed unharmed through the current crisis but how the State of Israel will look when we finish," said Histadrut labor federation chairman Arnon Bar-David. "Every union leader must show responsibility and lead his own public. We are at war and should act like we are at war. We will continue to act and do everything for the workers, for the economy and Israeli society."

Bar-David ordered the establishment of a Histadrut emergency body, starting work on Sunday to help trade union leaders enforce the new guidelines. The acting chairman of the Presidium of Israeli Business Organizations, Dubi Amitai, emphasized that the fate of the business sector mirrors the fate of the public.

"The business sector is the growth engine of the economy and is the reason for the strength of the Israeli economy," said Amitai. "Despite the uncertainty around decision-making regarding compensation, we expect that the state will stabilize, will put its hand in its pocket and assist us to cope with this event of an unprecedented scale."

As the number of confirmed cases of the coronavirus continue to rise in Israel, restrictions on the workplace and public activities are expected to increase in tandem. For employees lacking job security and the state, the true financial impact of the outbreak is unlikely to be known for some time.

 

 
From: WEBELIAHU DelphiPlus Member Icon3/19/20 5:49 AM 
To: All  (32 of 173) 
 10373.32 in reply to 10373.20 

March 19, 2020

         "Michael Levitt praised Israel for its preventative measures. He said most people are naturally immune, and that since the infection rate in China is slowing down, "the end of the pandemic is near."

https://www.jpost.com/HEALTH-SCIENCE/Israeli-nobel-laureate-Coronavirus-spread-is-slowing-621145

Israeli Nobel Laureate: Coronavirus spread is slowing

Michael Levitt praised Israel for its preventative measures. He said most people are naturally immune, and that since the infection rate in China is slowing down, "the end of the pandemic is near."

The coronavirus epidemic is slowing down in China, and will not pose a risk to the majority of people, an Israeli Nobel Prize laureate has said. Michael Levitt, an American-British-Israeli biophysicist who won the 2013 Nobel prize for chemistry for "the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems," has become something of a household name in China over the last few months. Although his specialty is not in epidemiology, he accurately forecast the slowing down of the spread of the virus in February, giving hope to those affected by the lockdown. But far from being a modern-day prophet, he explained in an interview with Calcalist that he simply crunched the numbers. 

Levitt's wife, Shoshan Brosh, is a researcher of Chinese art, meaning that the couple regularly travels between America, Israel and China. Consequently, when the virus broke out in Hubei province, Levitt wrote to his Chinese friends in support.

“When they answered us, describing how complicated their situation was, I decided to take a deeper look at the numbers in the hope of reaching some conclusion,” Levitt explained. “The rate of infection of the virus in the Hubei province increased by 30% each day — that is a scary statistic. I am not an influenza expert but I can analyze numbers and that is exponential growth.”

Had the growth continued at that rate, the whole world would have become infected within 90 days. But as Levitt continued to process the numbers, the pattern changed. On February 1, when he first looked at the statistics, Hubei Province had 1,800 new cases a day. By February 6, that number had reached 4,700 new cases a day.

But on February 7, something changed. “The number of new infections started to drop linearly and did not stop," Levitt said. "A week later, the same happened with the number of the deaths. This dramatic change in the curve marked the median point and enabled better prediction of when the pandemic will end. Based on that, I concluded that the situation in all of China will improve within two weeks. And, indeed, now there are very few new infection cases.”

Levitt likened the trend to diminishing interest rates: if a person receives a 30% interest rate on their savings on Day 1, a 29% rate on Day 2, and so on, “you understand that eventually, you will not earn very much.”

Similarly, although new cases are being reported in China, they represent a fraction of those reported in the early stages. “Even if the interest rate keeps dropping, you still make money," he said. "The sum you invested does not lessen, it just grows more slowly. When discussing diseases, it frightens people a lot because they keep hearing about new cases every day. But the fact that the infection rate is slowing down means the end of the pandemic is near.”

By plotting the data forward, Levitt has predicted that the virus will likely disappear from China by the end of March. THE REASON for the slowdown is due to the fact that exponential models assume that people with the virus will continue to infect others at a steady rate. In the early phase of COVID-19, that rate was 2.2 people a day on average.

“In exponential growth models, you assume that new people can be infected every day, because you keep meeting new people," Levitt said. "But, if you consider your own social circle, you basically meet the same people every day. You can meet new people on public transportation, for example; but even on the bus, after some time most passengers will either be infected or immune.”

However, that doesn't mean Levitt is dismissive of the precautions being put in place by governments around the world.

“You don’t hug every person you meet on the street now, and you’ll avoid meeting face to face with someone that has a cold, like we did,” Levitt said. “The more you adhere, the more you can keep infection in check. So, under these circumstances, a carrier will only infect 1.5 people every three days and the rate will keep going down.”

Isolation and limiting social contact is not the only factor at play, however. In Wuhan, where the virus first emerged, the whole population theoretically was at risk of becoming infected, but only 3% were.

The Diamond Princess cruise ship represented the worst-case scenario in terms of disease spread, as the close confines of the ship offered optimal conditions for the virus to be passed among those aboard. The population density aboard the ship was the equivalent of trying to cram the whole Israeli population into an area 30 kilometers square. In addition, the ship had a central air conditioning and heating system, and communal dining rooms.

“Those are extremely comfortable conditions for the virus and still, only 20% were infected. It is a lot, but pretty similar to the infection rate of the common flu,” Levitt said. Based on those figures, his conclusion was that most people are simply naturally immune.

 

Messages 33 through 34 of 173 were Deleted  

 
From: WEBELIAHU DelphiPlus Member Icon3/20/20 3:56 AM 
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 10373.35 in reply to 10373.34 

March 20, 2020

           "According to the Health Ministry, almost 2,600 medical professionals are in isolation, including 862 doctors.The chair of the residents’ organization Mirsham, Dr. Rey Biton, lamented Monday in a statement that “entire wards have been closed, vital medical teams have gone into quarantine, and our most valuable resources – doctors – are going to waste.”

https://www.jpost.com/Israel-News/With-255-cases-of-coronavirus-why-is-Israel-in-near-lockdown-621205

Coronavirus: With only around 300 cases, why is Israel in near-lockdown?

Almost every aspect of the country’s crippling medical system can be understood as the coronavirus crisis unfolds.

The novel coronavirus that has spread across the world, infecting more than 175,000 people, has hit the Jewish state too. But according to the Health Ministry, around 300 Israelis have COVID-19, and no one has died. So why is the government shutting the country down?
 
According to experts in public policy and health, the severity of the measures being taken now is because the country has let its medical system deteriorate for decades, and now it is unprepared.
 
“Before the outbreak of the current pandemic, hospital occupancy rates in Israel were already the highest in the developed world, while its mortality rates from infectious diseases, which doubled in the past two decades alone, are not only higher than in every other developed country, they are 73% higher than the second-ranked country,” said Prof. Dan Ben-David, president and founder of the Shoresh Institution for Socioeconomic Research and a faculty member at Tel Aviv University’s Department of Public Policy. “We shut the country down to deal with something that we neglected for decades.”
 
Almost every aspect of the country’s crippled medical system can be understood as the coronavirus crisis unfolds.
 
With high occupancy rates in hospitals – some are over 100% all year and sometimes during flu season they top 200%, according to Ben-David – then people are treated in the corridors and dining halls under unclean conditions.
 
“It’s like a petri dish,” he said. “So there is no wonder that people die at such fast rates from infectious disease. Fifteen times more people die from infectious disease than car accidents.
 
“If we would have occupancy rates like hospitals in other countries, we would be able to hospitalize people at first” before shutting down the country, Ben-David said.
 
Moreover, even if there had been enough beds, there also is not enough staff, he said. Israel is woefully understaffed when it comes to all medical professionals, the statistics show, but especially when it comes to nurses. According to Ben-David, Israel has nearly the lowest number of nurses per capita compared with other OECD countries and nearly the lowest number of nursing-school graduates.
 
And what about laboratories? Many more tests could be processed faster if labs were more fully staffed and could dedicate more hours.
 
What is even worse, said Zeev Feldman, chairman of the Organization of the State Employed Physicians of Israel and deputy president of the Israeli Medical Association, is that the country lacks protective gear needed by doctors and lab workers to ensure they do not become infected when treating patients or checking their polymerase chain reaction (PCR) screening test.
 
On Monday, the deputy director-general of the Health Ministry’s central laboratory for detecting coronavirus at Sheba Medical Center in Tel Hashomer tested positive for COVID-19. The lab was shut down. It had carried out approximately 480 tests on a daily basis.
 
In addition, two medical professionals at Ichilov Hospital in Tel Aviv reportedly contracted the virus.
 
According to the Health Ministry, almost 2,600 medical professionals are in isolation, including 862 doctors.The chair of the residents’ organization Mirsham, Dr. Rey Biton, lamented Monday in a statement that “entire wards have been closed, vital medical teams have gone into quarantine, and our most valuable resources – doctors – are going to waste.”
 
She called on the Health Ministry to provide enough protective gear to medical professionals and to make it obligatory that they wear it when examining patients showing symptoms of the novel coronavirus. Those symptoms include fever, coughing and difficulty breathing.
 
Hospitals were running low on protective masks, Israeli Medical Association chairman Prof. Zion Hagay said. A large number of masks and protective suits had been stolen, he said.
  • Edited March 20, 2020 4:23 am  by  WEBELIAHU
 

 
From: WEBELIAHU DelphiPlus Member Icon3/23/20 7:12 PM 
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 10373.36 in reply to 10373.20 
OU.org       
  

Joint Statement to the Orthodox Community
Regarding Pesach

Rabbinic leaders and organizations across the Orthodox spectrum have, individually, declared the health threat presented by COVID-19 a mortal threat (sakanas nefashos). We, leaders of major American Orthodox Jewish organizations, join together again to further clarify our shared and firm guidance for our communities.

We have heretofore urged not only full compliance with all health guidance issued by federal, state and local governments, but have gone beyond those pronouncements in urging our communities to remain at home and avoid, to the maximum extent feasible, any outside interactions.

With regard to the upcoming Pesach holiday, we note specifically the following critical mandates, shared in consultation with leading infectious disease and public health experts:

1. We are accustomed to honoring Pesach to the fullest degree, including taking haircuts, purchasing new clothing and tableware, and preparing the fullest menus. This year’s public health crisis mandates us to significantly limit all of the above. Our responsibility is to refrain from any NON-ESSENTIAL outside interactions, including especially in-store shopping. If there is a need for truly ESSENTIAL purchases, send one family member only – who is neither ill, vulnerable, nor of known exposure to COVID-19 – as rarely and as briefly as possible. Stores serving the community should shift to home delivery or drive-by parking lot pick-up of pre-orders, and – to the extent this is not possible – must take substantive steps to minimize crowding, maintain hygiene, and maximize social distancing.

We will truly honor Pesach by limiting our purchases to the truly ESSENTIAL, ensuring that all of us – especially the vulnerable – are able to celebrate Pesach in good health. We must STAY HOME; SAVE LIVES.

2. The Pesach plans of many have been completely upended. This creates severe difficulty for so many. We are deeply sympathetic to this enormous difficulty. Nevertheless, public health demands strict adherence to the current guidance. Travel to other cities must be cancelled, whether to vacation venues (Florida, etc.) or to family. Everyone must plan to celebrate Pesach where they are currently.

Individuals living alone or those absolutely unable to prepare for Pesach may choose to self-quarantine for 14 days, and then – if asymptomatic – may join with a welcoming local family that is similarly asymptomatic and that has been disciplined in staying home and limiting their interactions outside the home to the absolute minimum as described above.

These guests may join one family only for the duration, without additional company, and must carefully observe the mandated standards of scrupulous hygiene and social distancing. The elderly and high risk must seek medical advice before considering this.

STAY HOME; SAVE LIVES

We urge one and all – while strictly maintaining the prescribed guidelines – to look out for each other by reaching out to and providing for each other, especially those living alone.

We hope and pray that our sincere tefillos (prayers) and chassadim (acts of kindness) will move Hashem to swiftly remove this plague from the world and bless us all with health, peace and tranquility.

Rabbi Chaim Dovid Zweibel, Executive Vice President, Agudath Israel of America Rabbi Mendy Mirocznick, Executive Vice-President, Igud HaRabbanim - Rabbinical Alliance of America
Rabbi Shmuel Blech, Chairman, Rabbi Moshe Chaim Weisberg, Co-Chair, The Lakewood Vaad
Farley Weiss, President, National Council of Young Israel
Moishe Bane, President, Allen Fagin, Executive Vice President, the Orthodox Union Rabbi Daniel Korobkin, President, Rabbi Mark Dratch, Executive Vice President, Rabbinical Council of America

 

 
From: WEBELIAHU DelphiPlus Member Icon3/24/20 7:55 AM 
To: All  (37 of 173) 
 10373.37 in reply to 10373.20 

March 24, 2020

https://www.jpost.com/judaism/Why-mikvahs-are-open-during-the-coronavirus-outbreak-for-now-621832

Why mikvahs are open during the coronavirus outbreak – for now

A decision Thursday by the Village of Kiryas Joel, a Hasidic enclave an hour north of Manhattan, may hint at what’s to come.

When the rabbis of New Jersey’s suburban Bergen County took the bold step of shutting down almost all facets of communal Jewish life last week, they left the doors of one institution open: the women’s mikvah, or ritual bath.

That pattern has been repeated in place after place this week as the Jewish world has responded to the coronavirus epidemic. In multiple communities in the United States and across Israel, women’s mikvahs have stayed open even after synagogues, schools and even men’s baths have closed.
 
Found in virtually every significant Jewish community in the world, mikvahs enable Jewish women who observe religious law to resume physical relations with their husbands following the completion of their menstrual cycle. For Jews who observe the laws of mikvah most scrupulously, closing the women’s baths could mean not only no sex, but no hugging or touching their spouses in any way for the foreseeable future — an extreme privation and technical challenge for families stuck at home together.
 
“To be stuck here in the midst of a global pandemic, where there’s a lot of people dying and it’s emotionally challenging, and to not be able to have human contact is something that my husband and I are very much dreading,” said one 24-year-old Jerusalem woman who declined to give her name.
 
Women familiar with mikvahs say that with some minor adjustments, the baths meet all the requirements for a safe environment. But at a time when nearly all public spaces are temporarily closing, the continued operation of the baths raises questions.
 
“It would be safe to say that most epidemiologists would suggest that if there was a way to have an opportunity to put a stay on this type of activity until this epidemic has passed, that would be prudent,” said Ted Cohen, an epidemiologist at Yale University’s School of Health.
 
A decision Thursday by the Village of Kiryas Joel, a Hasidic enclave an hour north of Manhattan, may hint at what’s to come. The town announced a complete lockdown, including its ritual bathhouses, to stop the coronavirus’ spread.
 
Erin Piatetsky, the board president of a mikvah in the Washington, D.C., area, said that although the facility is staying open, board members are “extremely concerned” about the spread of COVID-19.
 
“We are all wondering when will the time come when perhaps we will have to [close],” she said. “We think that hasn’t come yet. We’ve been constantly putting in stricter and stricter cleaning precautions and checking precautions.”
 
Jewish women’s ritual immersion has distancing built into the process. Typically a woman goes in the water only in the presence of an attendant who checks that her immersion is done in accordance with Jewish law, which requires women to be clean and unadorned when they submerge themselves. That means that women who visit the mikvah face a lower risk of disease transmission than those who attend services in a synagogue crowded with other worshippers.
 
“You’re talking about one person immersing and one volunteer,” said Carrie Bornstein, the executive director of Mayyim Hayyim, a community ritual bath in Newton, Massachusetts, which has closed its education and art centers but kept open its mikvah.
 
Mayyim Hayyim has ramped up its disinfecting of public areas, treats the water regularly with a sanitizing agent, and is replacing pumices and other supplies for each visitor. Visitors must schedule their visits in advance and now prepare at home. And attendants responsible for making sure that women have met the Jewish legal requirements for immersion now do so from a distance.
 
“We’re also having people stay distant from each other when they are in the mikvah so it’s a much more controlled and contained environment,” Bornstein said.
 
The Eden Center, a Jerusalem-based group that works to educate women about mikvah usage, wants all mikvahs to adopt similar regulations. The center is pushing for mikvahs in Israel to remain open, and its director, Naomi Grumet, said she thinks closing the baths would be a last resort for the Israeli government.
 
“It’s part of the way of life of many, many people here, and I think in deference to that, the government officials will certainly want to try to keep it open as long as possible,” Grumet said. “That’s part of keeping a healthy and stress-free environment.”
 

 
From: WEBELIAHU DelphiPlus Member Icon3/25/20 6:37 PM 
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 10373.38 in reply to 10373.20 

March 25, 2020

         "Zelenko explained that there are two different diseases, the COVID-19 infection and the catastrophic lung injury, called acute respiratory distress syndrome, or ARDS. ARDS is the affliction requiring the use of hospital beds and ventilators, which has become a hot political issue because of the severe lack of supply. His protocol won't treat ARDS, but it can keep people from ever developing it."

https://www.wnd.com/2020/03/doctor-white-house-100-successful-coronavirus-treatment/

Doctor: White House has my '100% successful' coronavirus treatment

Israel is also considering the simple protocol of 3 cheap, proven, available drugs

Dr. Vladimir Zelenko

A recent survivor of an extremely rare cancer with a "100% mortality rate" that took one of his lungs, Dr. Vladimir Zelenko says he shouldn't be alive. But now, a simple cocktail of three cheap, proven, widely available drugs his medical team has used to successfully treat at least 500 patients with the coronavirus is offering hope as the pandemic grows exponentially in his area of greater New York City.

The treatment now has the attention of the White House and Israel's Ministry of Health, among others, Zelenko told WND in a phone interview Wednesday morning.

"I was actually wondering why God spared me," said Zelenko, who noted he hasn't slept in the past four days.

It's an out-patient treatment combining the common anti-malarial drug hydroxychloroquine with the popular antibotic azithromycin (known as Z-Pak) and zinc sulfate.

Zelenko, 46, told WND he is in direct communication with Mark Meadows, the North Carolina congressman who has been tapped by President Trump to become the next White House chief of staff.

"I don't know if the president saw [the protocols], but they were presented to whoever they needed to be presented to," he said.

"I know for a fact that my protocols are now at the Ministry of Health in Israel and that the government is considering adopting them."

On Tuesday, Vice President Mike Pence announced that the FDA has approved the use of hydroxychloroquine experimentally for any coronavirus patient while clinical trials commence. In a video widely distributed Tuesday on social media, Zelenko said he treated 350 patients for COVID-19 with 100% success. Since then, among an even higher sample, one person he treated has been hospitalized, he told WND.

"So, it's not 100%," he said, "but nothing in life is 100%."

"I'm not claiming any miracles here," Zelenko said. "All I did was take established remedies and modify the dosage slightly, based on data from studies in France and the Far East."

'We need to treat the world'

A once-irreligious Jew from Russia, Zelenko is now an observant member of the 30,000-strong Hasidic community of Kiryas Joel in Monroe, New York, in the Hudson Valley, about 50 miles north of New York City. He believes, based on the percentage of tests, that about 60% of that population, about 20,000, have been infected with the coronavirus.

Zelenko – directing his medical team from quarantine at home because of his lung loss and ongoing oral cancer treatment – is taking his coronavirus treatment himself as a prophylatic. But the target of his team is any patient with shortness of breath or other symptoms that put them in the high-risk category in which the mortality rate is 6% to 10%. The key, he said, is when to use the treatment.

"It's the combination of these three drugs given earlier rather than later seems to make a significant difference," he said.

Zelenko explained that there are two different diseases, the COVID-19 infection and the catastrophic lung injury, called acute respiratory distress syndrome, or ARDS. ARDS is the affliction requiring the use of hospital beds and ventilators, which has become a hot political issue because of the severe lack of supply. His protocol won't treat ARDS, but it can keep people from ever developing it.

"I believe it lowers the viral load and decreases the amount of virus that the immune system needs to deal with," he said. "It gives it time to overcome the development of the infection prior to development of ARDS or lung injury."

Zelenko said the results are "remarkable."

"I'm seeing respiratory symptoms resolve as fast as four hours. That's not the norm," he said. "It takes 12 hours on average, in my experience.

  • Edited March 25, 2020 6:38 pm  by  WEBELIAHU
 

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