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From: Dunggate10/17/13 9:22 AM 
To: All  (13 of 4236) 
 9959.13 in reply to 9959.12 
BEAUTIFUL

Israeli Anthem Sung by German Girl, Who Loves Israel!



 
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From: Dunggate10/17/13 11:59 AM 
To: All  (14 of 4236) 
 9959.14 in reply to 9959.13 

"And David went out to meet them, and answered and said unto them: ‘If ye be come peaceably unto me to help me, my heart shall be knit unto you; but if ye be come to betray me to mine adversaries, seeing there is no wrong in my hands, the God of our fathers look thereon, and give judgment.’ (1 Chronicles 12:18)
Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan (right) personally approved the exposing of ten Israeli spies operating against Iran according to The Washington Post. (Photo: Mohammed Al-Ostaz/Flash90)
The identities of ten Israeli spies operating in Iran were exposed by Turkey David Ignatius wrote in a column published in The Washington Post on Thursday.According to Ignatius, Ankara’s decision to expose the alleged Mossad informants came early last year as Turkish-Israeli relations continued to deteriorate following the 2010 Mavi Marmara incident.
Ignatius cites sources as saying the Turkish action was a “significant” loss of intelligence for Israel, and “an effort to slap the Israelis.”
According to Ignatius, the Mossad was running part of its Iranian spy network through Turkey. The Turkish intelligence conducts aggressive surveillance inside its borders, which enabled it to monitor covert Israeli-Iranian meetings.
Israel, Ignatius writes, ties Turkish intelligence chief Hakan Fidan to the Iranian intelligence. Despite that, Israel’s ally the US continued dealing with Fidan on sensitive matters and Washington did not protest the Turkish action directly to Ankara.
Fidan, who is a key adviser to Erdogan, has “rattled” key allies in the past by revealing sensitive information collected by Israel and the US to Iran, according to Ignatius.
The decision to reveal the identities of the spies was personally approved by Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan, according to Ignatius. The columnist speculated that the premier’s move may explain Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu’s initial refusal to apologize to Erdogan, who has made it a point to assume a more adversarial position toward Israel, in hopes of boosting Turkey’s regional standing, over the deaths of Turkish civilians on the Mavi Marmara.
Ignatius cited assessments by American intelligence officials who believe that the Mossad was taken by surprise considering that the Israeli spy agency had to that point enjoyed a 50-year working relationship with Turkey.



 

 
From: Dunggate10/17/13 12:01 PM 
To: All  (15 of 4236) 
 9959.15 in reply to 9959.14 

"Behold, I have given him for a witness to the peoples, a prince and commander to the peoples. (Isaiah 55:4)
Republican Joshua Wander, who currently lives in Ramat Beit Shemesh, Israel, is running for mayor of Pittsburgh (Photo: Screenshot).
Joshua Wander, a 43-year-old father of six from the Ramat Beit Shemesh is running on the Republican ticket for Mayor of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, according to the Jerusalem Post.
Wander, who recently moved to Israel to take a job as an independent security consultant said that he would be willing to terminate his current contract if he were to win the election, which will take place on November 5.
“I sort of fell into the position of being nominated,” Wander told The Jerusalem Post on Tuesday, explaining that because other potential Republican candidates dropped out at the last minute, he was essentially chosen by default.
According to local news station WPXI, Wander’s absence from a candidate’s forum on Monday led Bill Peduto, the Democrat running for the office, to quip: “I don’t think we’re going to be having any debates, but that’s OK.”
Wander has stated that he intends to return for debates, and the local Republican chairman told the Pittsburgh Post Gazette that the “peripatetic candidate,” as the paper has dubbed Wander, “hasn’t been gone that long” and that “he’ll be back.”
According to experts, Wander’s odds of winning is not high and his absence will not improve his chances.
Pittsburgh has not elected a Republican mayor since 1934. Wander says he is running to give residents an alternative.
“It’s not a matter of if I win or lose,” he told the Post. “I already won the election by virtue of the fact that I am giving the electorate the other option that they wouldn’t have otherwise.”
He added that despite having sold his house prior to coming to Israel, he was here only for work and has maintained a residence in Pittsburgh in case he is elected.
“I did sell my house there.
That was a question of the market being very profitable at the time. It was a good time to sell. It had nothing to do with our subsequent move,” Wander stated.
He couldn’t be “too explicit” about his work here, he said, but was willing to say that “it is understood that as soon as I win as mayor of the city of Pittsburgh I will cancel my contract” and go back.
“I have a family with six children and I have to support them, and especially considering the history of the Republican party [in Pittsburgh], I can’t quit my day job and decide I’m just going to run full time,” he added.
Wander originally came to Israel as a student in 1987, and subsequently served in the IDF and got married before returning to the US to further his education at a local university. During his time in Israel, he says he became an activist with the anti-Oslo Accords Zo Artzeinu movement, worked as an advisor to the Moledet Knesset faction and even spent time as an editor at JPost.com.



 

 
From: Dunggate10/17/13 12:02 PM 
To: All  (16 of 4236) 
 9959.16 in reply to 9959.15 
"Hear counsel, and receive instruction, that thou mayest be wise in thy latter end. (Proverbs 19:20)

Prime Minister Netanyahu is set to meet with Pope Francis for the first time since his ordination when he travels to Rome next week. (Photo: Kobi Gideon/GPO/Flash90)
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is scheduled to travel to Rome next week, where he is set to meet with Pope Francis for the first time, according to the Jerusalem Post. Netanyahu will meet with US Secretary of State John Kerry there as well his office announced Wednesday.
The prime minister is expected to meet with Kerry on October 23 and discuss Iran and the ongoing peace talks.
President Shimon Peres met with the pope in April, and Knesset Speaker Yuli Edelstein spoke with him at the Vatican last week
While there has been much conversation as to when the pope will visit Israel, no official date has been set as of yet. During his meeting with Edelstein, the pope said, “I will come, yes I’ll come,” in response to the Knesset speaker’s




 

 
From: Dunggate10/17/13 12:03 PM 
To: All  (17 of 4236) 
 9959.17 in reply to 9959.16 
Former Mossad Agent Debuts Novel In UK


Mishka Ben-David has gone from a secret life as a top operative for Israel’s intelligence agency to a writing career that has landed his name on the covers of hit spy thrillers. Making his literary debut in the UK with the first English translation of his novel ‘Duet in Beirut’, Ben-David revealed his life as a Mossad agent shapes much of his thrillers.


 

 
From: Dunggate10/17/13 1:50 PM 
To: All  (18 of 4236) 
 9959.18 in reply to 9959.17 
Pittsburgh Mayoral Race Profile: Josh Wander
Channel 4 Action News’ Bob Mayo has the Pittsburgh Mayoral profile of Republican Josh Wander.

Joshua Wander, a 43-year-old father of six from the Ramat Beit Shemesh is running on the Republican ticket for Mayor of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, according to the Jerusalem Post.
Wander, who recently moved to Israel to take a job as an independent security consultant said that he would be willing to terminate his current contract if he were to win the election, which will take place on November 5.
“I sort of fell into the position of being nominated,” Wander told The Jerusalem Post on Tuesday, explaining that because other potential Republican candidates dropped out at the last minute, he was essentially chosen by default.
According to local news station WPXI, Wander’s absence from a candidate’s forum on Monday led Bill Peduto, the Democrat running for the office, to quip: “I don’t think we’re going to be having any debates, but that’s OK.”
Wander has stated that he intends to return for debates, and the local Republican chairman told the Pittsburgh Post Gazette that the “peripatetic candidate,” as the paper has dubbed Wander, “hasn’t been gone that long” and that “he’ll be back.”
According to experts, Wander’s odds of winning is not high and his absence will not improve his chances.
Pittsburgh has not elected a Republican mayor since 1934. Wander says he is running to give residents an alternative.
“It’s not a matter of if I win or lose,” he told the Post. “I already won the election by virtue of the fact that I am giving the electorate the other option that they wouldn’t have otherwise.”
He added that despite having sold his house prior to coming to Israel, he was here only for work and has maintained a residence in Pittsburgh in case he is elected.
“I did sell my house there.
That was a question of the market being very profitable at the time. It was a good time to sell. It had nothing to do with our subsequent move,” Wander stated.
He couldn’t be “too explicit” about his work here, he said, but was willing to say that “it is understood that as soon as I win as mayor of the city of Pittsburgh I will cancel my contract” and go back.
“I have a family with six children and I have to support them, and especially considering the history of the Republican party [in Pittsburgh], I can’t quit my day job and decide I’m just going to run full time,” he added.
Wander originally came to Israel as a student in 1987, and subsequently served in the IDF and got married before returning to the US to further his education at a local university. During his time in Israel, he says he became an activist with the anti-Oslo Accords Zo Artzeinu movement, worked as an advisor to the Moledet Knesset faction and even spent time as an editor at JPost.com.



 

 
From: Dunggate10/17/13 1:52 PM 
To: All  (19 of 4236) 
 9959.19 in reply to 9959.18 

An historic agreement has been drafted between Israel and the Vatican
The Israeli authorities have granted the Pope an official seat in the room where the Last Supper is believed to have taken place, on Mount Zion in Jerusalem, and where David and Solomon, Jewish kings of Judea, are considered by some researchers, to also be buried.





 

 
From: Dunggate10/18/13 1:17 PM 
To: All  (20 of 4236) 
 9959.20 in reply to 9959.19 

Posted by: Doni Kandel  October 18, 2013 , 10:28 am
Terror and the pit are come upon us, desolation and destruction. Mine eye runneth down with rivers of water, for the breach of the daughter of my people. (Lamentations 3:47-48)
View from a scene where a Palestinian man was shot and killed after ramming into an army base north of Jerusalem, using a tractor, in what the IDF described as a suspected terror attack. (Photo: IDF Spokesperson/Flash90)
The IDF shot and killed a Palestinian man who had forced his way on to an army base north of Jerusalem with a tractor on Thursday night, according to The Times of Israel. The IDF is treating the event as an attempted terror attack.
Palestinian officials said the suspect was identified as Younis al-Radeideh. His family reportedly recently received a demolition order for their East Jerusalem home, according to Walla News.
According to reports, in 2009, his brother Marei al-Radeideh, a resident of Bet Hanina, was shot dead in a similar incident in Jerusalem when he drove a tractor into two vehicles, including a police car and an empty bus. He was shot by officers at the scene.
Younis Radeideh is believed by Israeli officials to have acted on his own, Israel Radio reported.
Rama Base is located next to Al-Ram, a Palestinian neighborhood.The IDF upped its readiness in wake of the attack, which came without any prior warning, according to Israel Radio.
Radeideh reportedly drove up to the base in the early evening and asked to enter. While the soldier at the gate clarified whether he had permission to do so, he rammed the tractor into the gate, making his way into the base and hitting an army vehicle in his way.
Two soldiers fired at Radeideh, wounding him. An IDF medical team at the scene pronounced him dead shortly after.
“IDF soldiers felt an immediate threat and opened fire,” the IDF Spokesperson’s Office told the Times of Israel. One soldier was lightly hurt in the commotion.
In December of 2012 two Palestinian terrorists, in the middle of a storm, begged entrance to the Rama Base. After being allowed in they pepper sprayed a soldier and stole his weapon.
In 2008, Jerusalem suffered a spate of terror attacks involving tractors. In July that year, an East Jerusalem resident killed three people, and wounded 30, after he rammed his construction vehicle into buses and cars and trampled pedestrians on Rashi, Jaffa and Sarei Israel streets in the city. He was shot dead at the scene. Three weeks later, another Palestinian man used his tractor to plow into vehicles on King David street in Jerusalem, making his way to Keren Hayesod street, where he was shot and killed by a Border Police officer. Twenty four people were injured in that incident.
In September that same year, another East Jerusalem resident rammed a private vehicle into IDF soldiers and civilians standing near the Old City. Several people were wounded and the driver was shot and killed.  



 

 
From: Dunggate10/18/13 1:25 PM 
To: All  (21 of 4236) 
 9959.21 in reply to 9959.20 
Posted by: Tuly Weisz  October 17, 2013 , 4:02 pm
According to Jewish tradition, the scandalous origins of the Messiah are described in a shocking story in this week’s Torah portion.
Given the prevalence of Christian anti-Semitism in previous generations, it is not surprising that many classical Jewish texts are antagonistic towards Christianity.  There is a notable exception, however, in a passage by one of Judaism’s most influential rabbis, known as Maimonides.  In his “Laws of Kings,” the 12th century Jewish philosopher and Torah scholar discusses the role of other religions in the Messianic era:

"Nevertheless, the thoughts of the Creator of the world are not within the power of man to reach them, ‘for our ways are not His ways, nor are our thoughts His thoughts’ (Isaiah 55:8). And all these matters of Jesus of Nazareth and that of [Mohammed] the Ishmaelite who arose after him are only to straighten the way of the king Moshiach and to fix the entire world, to serve God as one, as it is stated (Zephaniah 3:9), “For then I will turn to the peoples (into) clear speech, to all call in the name of God and serve Him unanimously
.
Jews look forward to the arrival of the Messiah (Moshiach) in anticipation of the era in which the whole world recognizes the One True God. The Nation of Israel’s biggest challenge is that as .02% of the world’s population, our voice is hardly heard, our influence limited. With great foresight, Maimonides wrote nearly one thousand years ago that billions of non Jews would “straighten the way of the king Moshiach” by helping to spread the idea of Messianism around the world.
Christians believe that the identity of the Messiah has been revealed, however, as Jews we don’t.  We are aware only of his lineage and where he comes from. According to Jewish tradition, the origins of the Messiah are described in a shocking story in this week’s Torah portion.
This Shabbat in synagogue we will read Genesis 19 where Abraham’s nephew Lot and his two daughters narrowly escape the total destruction of the wicked city of Sodom.  Left hiding in a cave, Lot’s daughters fear the three are alone in the world, and decide it is their responsibility to repopulate the earth.  Each conceives a child and the older daughter disgracefully names her child Moab, which in Hebrew means ‘me av’ – ‘from my father.’
Genesis contains yet another scandal when Tamar, the daughter in law of Judah, disguises herself as a prostitute and seduces the father of her deceased husband in the hopes of bearing a child. Genesis 38 tells us that the offspring of this shocking relationship is Peretz. You could think of no worst lineage than a daughter of Moab marrying a son of Peretz, yet that is exactly what happens. In God’s infinite wisdom, Tamar’s seemingly immodest deed is validated and her intentions prove to be holy when we are told that the child who descends from both Moab and Peretz is none other than King David. Amongst his many accomplishments, King David is known as the progenitor of the Moshiach. From here a vital lesson to all who anticipate the arrival of the Messiah emerges.
As religious people, we firmly believe in the principles of our faith. Yet, as believers, we must also be mindful of the delicate balance between conviction and arrogance. As devout as we are, we must not become too presumptuous to assume we know God’s ways. In the same passage mentioned earlier, Maimonides warns us that, “the thoughts of the Creator of the world are not within the power of man to reach them, ‘for our ways are not His ways, nor are our thoughts His thoughts.”  On a micro-level, God’s road map for our individual lives do not necessarily coincide with our own well-scripted plans for our future and this is especially true on a macro-level, when it comes to the destiny of all humanity. While I would have assumed that the Moshiach would certainly come from the best family and only have gone to the best schools, clearly God has different ideas.
In a refreshing example of humility and openness, the influential pro-Israel Pastor John Hagee describes in his book In Defense of Israel of his deep relationship with his colleague, Orthodox Rabbi Aryeh Scheinberg:
“The rabbi and I have become more than close friends over the years, more like brothers. I thoroughly enjoy those rare occasions when we have time to sit and talk about the Torah and world affairs. We agree on many, many things, but when it comes to the nature and identity of the Messiah, of course we simply agree to disagree – with the understanding that when we stand in the streets of Jerusalem and see Messiah walking toward us, one of us will have a major theological adjustment to make!”
Hagee’s humility and acknowledgment that God may still surprise him demonstrates an internalization of the Scripture quoted by Maimonides: “For My thoughts are not your thoughts, neither are your ways My ways, saith the Lord” (Isaiah 55:8).
In addition to his prolific writings on Jewish Law, Maimonides canonized what are universally considered to be the pillars of Jewish faith, thirteen ideas that define what a Jew must believe. The twelfth principle states, “I believe with perfect faith in the coming of the Messiah. How long it takes, I will await his coming every day.” In our unique era when Jews and Christians are standing together on behalf of Israel, may our common anticipation in the coming of the Moshiach lead to the fulfillment of the words of Maimonides when we together “fix the entire world, to serve God as one.”   


 

 
From: Dunggate10/18/13 1:29 PM 
To: All  (22 of 4236) 
 9959.22 in reply to 9959.21 
Posted by: Ahuva Balofsky  October 18, 2013 , 10:05 am

“…one from among thy brethren shalt thou set king over thee…” (Deuteronomy 17:15)
Ethiopian
Awake Mengistu is running for mayor of Kiryat Malachi with hopes of becoming Israel’s fist ever Ethiopian mayor. (Photo: Jpost.com)
Although a mayor is not quite a king, Awake Mengistu wants to show the people of Kiryat Malachi — and of Israel — that he is one of their “brethren.”  Mengistu moved to Israel when he was five years old and hopes next week to make history as the country’s first Ethiopian-born mayor.
Mengistu was drawn to politics in January 2012.  At that time, a Channel 2 news report revealed that one neighborhood in his town had agreed collectively not to rent or sell property to Ethiopians.  The city is home to the country’s largest Ethiopian population, and thousands of demonstrators gathered to protest the discriminatory policy.  The protesters’ subsequent march to Jerusalem, some 50 kilometers away, ended in demands from the Knesset to enact anti-racist legislation.  The Association for Civil Rights in Israel called on the Registrar of Real Estate to revoke the licence of real estate agents who practice such discrimination.
His involvement in the protests taught him to believe in political activism as a means to reform society.  His campaign, called “Edan Hadash” (New Era), is founded on the principle that to change the country, one must begin locally.
Edan Hadash, which is part of the Yesh Atid list, believes that education is key to changing attitudes.  But it’s not “only education in a classroom,” Mengistu said. “We’re talking about non-formal education like through youth movements, or even taking an empty bottle and putting it in the garbage.”
Nurit Tizazu, second on the campaign ticket, admits this is “only the beginning of this process.”  The ultimate goal, she says, is to eliminate discrimination within two or three generations.
Deputy Knesset Speaker Pnina Tamnu-Shata (Yesh Atid), the first Ethiopian woman in the legislature, reiterated the significance of having an Ethiopian mayor in Israel.  “If we want to win [against] all this discrimination, we need to put people in front like Awake,” she said.  She stated that racism needs to be confronted at both the local and national level.
In addition to a focus on education for good citizenship, Mengistu is campaigning on plans to create employment opportunities and affordable housing in Kiryat Malachi, raise the school system’s grade-point-average and improve the city’s social welfare programs.
Mengistu is competing against five other mayoral candidates in Tuesday’s upcoming race.  His primary disadvantages are his youth and inexperience.  He is only 27, a recent university graduate, and previously served as a staff-sergeant in the Givati infantry brigade’s reconnaissance company.  Other candidates include Lalo Zohar, a popular city councilman, and Yossi Hadad, the incumbent mayor.  Current polls put Mengistu at a mere 11%, but he is encouraged, because that is up from previous polls showing only 4% and 5%.  He also points out that none of the three polls conducted included Ethiopians, who make up 30% of the city’s eligible voters.
Still, even if they do not win the mayor’s seat, being elected to city council alone would be a significant accomplishment, says Shei Sium, who is third on Eden Hadash’s ticket.  It would take about 2,000 votes to earn three seats in council.
But both Sium and Mengistu worry about another disadvantage: the very discrimination they are trying to fight.  Sium wonders if their campaign posters, which show Edan Hadash’s five candidates, four of whom are black, are turning voters away.  Mengistu says he has been criticized because he is black.
“Why is it an issue [that] he is the first Ethiopian running [for mayor]?” Tizazu asked. “It’s a strong question for our society.”  



 

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