Opinion Polls: Delphi's Polling Place

Hosted by Cstar1

Opinion polls on all subjects. Opinions? Heck yes, we have opinions - but we're *always* nice about it, even when ours are diametrically opposed to yours. Register your vote today!

  • 4030
    MEMBERS
  • 75287
    MESSAGES
  • 15
    POSTS TODAY

Discussions

Poor RNC can't win   The Serious You: How Current Events Affect You

Started Jun-30 by Jeri (azpaints); 2657 views.
MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad

Jul-6

I too have hearing difficulties and accents are very hard.  I was giving Kissinger a pass for the sake of what could be a fascinating conversation, if both of us were younger.  He's 97.  Probably still sharp.  What he would talk about would be the stuff of history books,  Fascinating for sure, but not current.

The receptionist you discuss was not understanding the terms of her employment nor was she sensitive to the working environment.  Being religious is well and good, flaunting it is not, although I know that one of the goals of evangelicals is to evangelize at any and all opportunities. 

She obviously had a good heart, as they say, to call you to give you the news about your former assistant. 

I am amazed that they hired her again.  I wonder if she learned from her experiences and become more aware of and sensitive to the people around her. 

Jeri (azpaints)

From: Jeri (azpaints)

Jul-6

I would agree, he would be an interesting conversationalist (I'm assuming I, too, could understand his accent).

she was a recent convert and her church got a new pastor.  I'm not sure why she got so odd.  She had been with the firm before I started and was easy going until the change.

She was told to call me by the dad's paralegal to ask me to the graveside services.  Kind of a no choice situation.  She did not attend as they were Jewish; I'm Christian and was honored to be included.   I'm sure she had learned from being fired, and from contact I had it appeared she honestly did learn to be more tolerant.  She was a great mother and raised two sons to be responsible and patriotic- the one made a career of the Army.  90% of the time she was a lot of fun to talk to, she just seemed to have a trigger.

 


 

 

 

MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad

Jul-6

I would too have been honored to be invited to attend a Jewish funeral.  You obviously had been important to her and she to you.  You dad's paralegal was thoughtful to have her call you.  Obviously, this was after she went back to work for them

What an odd sequence of changes in a person.  I wonder why religion changed her so much?  Sounds like she was an exceptional individual and employee except for that one blip.  One's children's are always a good testament to one's personality as a parent.  

I gather from the fact that you state she was fun to talk to that the intolerance came on rather suddenly.  That she had not been before the conversion and that she become more tolerant after her rehire. 

Jeri (azpaints)

From: Jeri (azpaints)

Jul-7

I could never work out what was going on and wondered if it was marital or knowing her son was going military during the war?  Her son served in Afghanistan in a non combat position but it would have driven me nuts!  It did come on suddenly now that I think about it.  

MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad

Jul-7

It may have been stress which caused her to embrace religion with a such intensity that she was willing to jeopardize and lose her job -- two jobs, in fact.  That's a good observation. 

For her to be rehired by a firm which she had alienated previously says a great deal about her skills, her personality, and the sincerity of her apologies and about the tolerance of the firm which rehired her.  

It's definitely puzzling.  It's an odd sequence:  go from being fun to talk to, to a religious fanatic willing to lose her job, to being rehired as a tolerant and friendly face of the firm as a receptionist.    

kizmet1 said:

Is it possible that certain high up politicians are tested daily along with their guards and staff?

There is a several day lag between early infection and a sufficient viral load to test positive for Covid-19. Thus, a negative test result really just means that they don't have enough virus to detect "right that moment". It is a snapshot of one's status.

There are also some false negatives, just because the tests are not completely infallible. This can create a false sense of security, and further confounds contact tracing when someone who tests negative then gets sick a few days later, and might have infected dozens before the symptoms countermand the negative medical test results.

There are also some false positives, although like the false negatives, the exact statistics are a moving target.

But the point is, just a test is not an absolute black and white result, although it is at least a useful tool to catch the majority of cases.

About the only way to truly be sure no one "important" catches the disease is to keep that important person totally full blown level IV isolated - that is, they wear a positive pressure hazmat suit with the air not only having been filtered but run through a high temperature oven then re-chilled to room temperature to be sure the air has been fully sterilized - and also to keep everyone else just as completely isolated.

Not just masks, not just tests, but the whole protocol one would use while studying something like Ebola or Lassa or Marburg.

They ain't doing that. So while the odds are lower of, say, Trump catching it, the probability is non-zero, and that is a high density kind of situation no matter what, so it's likely even the full resources of the federal government is no protection, precisely because if he won't wear a mask, he sure won't be a "bubble boy".

Showtalk said:

It’s impossible to speak clearly with a mask on. Did you hear Joe Biden? I’m not going to say anything rude about him, but his speech was muffled and sometimes incoherent. If Trump does that, they will mock him and say that proves he should not be president.

Maybe he should wear an astronaut type helmet instead with a really high quality microphone in it. Then they could make it beep every time he pauses in a speech, and he could step out to the podium and say "Houston, Tranquility Base here. The Eagle has landed. <beep>"

Then reach into a leg pocket and pull out a sample retrieval tool handle, install a golf club head on it, and whack a golf ball, or drop a feather and hammer at the same time - lol.

Jeri (azpaints) said:

But when one is simply walking, where one might greet someone in passing (or not) the "difficult to talk" is not applicable and a mask should be worn.

Being a ham radio operator, putting a microphone underneath a mask is a fairly trivial undertaking. And having been a pilot at the age of 17, communicating clearly in a high noise environment is something I learned is pretty easy to do, although it might not be intuitive.

In a noisy airplane cockpit, we used noise cancelling microphones even in the 1970s. In fighter jets, they have used throat microphones also since that era. These are contact transducers. You strap it on your neck, and it touches you at two separate points that it directly picks up the vibration of your vocal cords. When you talk, that electrical signal goes through an amplifier circuit into the other aircrews' headsets, and vice versa. You're plugged into a sort of "party line".

Then if you are pilot in command, your audio feed also goes into a box that will feed the radio when you key the microphone, so Air Traffic Control can clearly hear you say something like "Lubbock approach, Bonanza Three two six three Bravo, radial two one one DME seventeen"

Heck, YouTubers have been using very high quality and tiny microphones for years that work quite nicely under a mask.

For a public speech, it can even be a wireless mike. They put a small radio receiver somewhere near the stage, maybe with a diversity reception antenna system, probably circularly polarized, so the speaker can walk around. The signal is then fed into the venue's public address system, and to any television and radio media outlets, including on-line streaming, via distribution amplifiers, or by different media outlets just having their own radio receivers tuned to the wireless microphone frequency.

It simplifies setting up the sound in a venue, and the sound quality is excellent.

So that's not even new technology. Today we also have digital signal processing that can clean up movement of microphone element rubbing against the mask, do dynamic range compression, and other processes to really get the sound top notch quality.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Jul-14

That would get attention.  Masks don’t look good on people or people don’t look good in masks.  There is something creepy about not being able to read facial expressions or see smiles.  I heard an ICU nurse talking about treating nonverbal children, babies and toddlers, wearing masks where they can’t see smiles.  The children don’t recover as quickly and don’t connect to their caregivers.  It’s even worse now if parents are not allowed in and the child is alone with a rotating group of masked strangers.

With an astronaut helmet, one could read facial expressions. They can even use an anti-reflective coating on the visor, and put LED lights inside to further illuminate the face, like the space suit helmet design depicted in the Stanley Kubrick film "2001: A Space Odyssey".

What would be hilarious would be for a politician to take the podium wearing one of those, then his first words were (doing a sound check) "Hal. Open the pod bay doors, Hal."

and someone out of sight then says through the PA system "I'm afraid I can't do that, Dave."

although of course the plot in that scene was Dave had left his helmet behind and not taken it with him into the pod - something every would-be astronaut (and actual astronaut / cosmonaut) has likely pointed out is an absolute no-no in any real space mission as a serious breach of basic safety protocol.

The politician could then deviate from the famous script by saying something like "Then I'll come in the airlock - as you can see, I remembered my space helmet".

weather update. 45.6 degrees C. It's dry enough though that stepping out in 114 degree heat if you soak your T shirt in water first, only feels like maybe upper 80s - at least for the first 5 minutes until it dries out.

TOP