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90 Miles West of Central Park   currents

Started 6/7/05 by Paul (SNOTZALOT); 86577 views.
Paul (SNOTZALOT)

From: Paul (SNOTZALOT)

9/29/09

Not a single tomato from the garden this year due to the late tomato blight. I understand the blight came north with all of the tomato plants grown down south that were shipped north to the big box stores. Plus we had perfect wet conditions for the blight to spread. The blight isn't supposed to over winter up here since the ground freezes.

I had a nice family of rabbits devour most of the rest of my garden this summer so the harvest wasn't great. Rabbits don't like swiss chard, beets, cukes, onions, strawberries. The love peas, lettuce, the broccoli/cabbage family, and absolutely love squash. I picked up a new Hav-A-Hart trap yesterday, I'm going to see if  can move the family a few miles from here.

I planted two large rows of spinach last week. They will give me some harvest this fall, but I want them to over winter and give me early greens. I'm going to build two hoop houses to cover these rows.
Carol Ann (Knit_Chat)

From: Carol Ann (Knit_Chat)

9/29/09

We got a few tomatoes and some green beans but that's about all this year. A racoon climbed the fence and chomped on all the pumpkins and the rest of the produce so the garden is yielding very little for we humans this season. We trapped the critter and our township picked him up and relocated the thief.

Hopefully the crops will be better next year.

Paul (SNOTZALOT)

From: Paul (SNOTZALOT)

9/29/09

Pennsylvania law states you can't transport critters, they must be destroyed. Only gun I own is a nail gun, so we take the critters about 3 miles north to a nice lake......

Garlic is ordered, will plant next week, spinach is up, so the 2010 garden is underway!
  • Edited 9/29/2009 8:55 am ET by Paul (SNOTZALOT)
Carol Ann (Knit_Chat)

From: Carol Ann (Knit_Chat)

9/29/09

We can't transport the critters ourselves so we call the township and they send out the Animal Warden and he transports/relocates the animal. Our township doesn't destroy them anymore so they send the stray cats to a humane shelter, or relocate the wildlife to one of the large county parks we have a few miles from the township. Some of the animals wind up in a local children's zoo.
In reply toRe: msg 108
Paul (SNOTZALOT)

From: Paul (SNOTZALOT)

9/30/09

Sweet Roasted Butternut Squash and Greens Over Bow-Tie Pasta

http://tinyurl.com/yaztwas

From The Splendid Table's® How to Eat Supper: Recipes, Stories, and Opinions from Public Radio's Award-Winning Food Show by Lynne Rossetto Kasper and Sally Swift (Clarkson Potter/Publishers, 2008). Copyright © 2008 by American Public Media.

Serves 4 to 6

10 minutes prep time; 35 minutes oven time





  • Edited 9/30/2009 6:41 am ET by Paul (SNOTZALOT)
Paul (SNOTZALOT)

From: Paul (SNOTZALOT)

10/9/09

Carol Ann,

Tips to Prevent Overwintering Late Blight

Here are some tips for preventing late blight from coming back in your fields next year. The sheet can be found here as well: Tips to Prevent Overwintering Late Blight

Tips to Prevent Overwintering Late Blight

Late blight (Phytophthora infestans) occurs commonly each year in many places around the United States and the world.

There are steps we, as home gardeners, market farmers and commercial growers alike, can take in order to reduce late blight inoculum surviving the winter.

The following tips for fall will help prevent the spread of late blight (Phytophthora infestans). They are different from summer management techniques:

» If possible, start with new seed potatoes in the spring that have been certified disease free.

» Cull any potatoes that are suspect before putting them into storage - potato tubers with late blight will have a dry, reddish brown rot in the flesh.

» Turn soil in garden or fields so that crop residues can readily decompose - late blight needs live tissue to survive. This includes tomato crop residue as well. As long as tissues decompose or die (no living plant tissue), then the late blight on that plant tissue will be killed as well.

» Cull potatoes in storage throughout fall and winter months that are suspect.

» Try to dig up all possible tubers - cull volunteer plants that emerge in the spring.

» Cull piles should be thin enough to freeze solid over the winter.

» Cull piles can also be managed so that they heat up significantly - this is achieved by adding the proper mix of brown and green ingredients to your compost pile and turning. A compost thermometer might be helpful.

» In the northeast US only one type of late blight is found so all measures outlined above will help prevent late blight from overwintering. In some parts of the United States and the world two different types of late blight can be found in the same location thus allowing the pathogen to ‘mate' and produce oospores, capable of
surviving temperature extremes - in this case crop rotation is very important in reducing oospore inoculum on possible plant hosts. Crop rotation is important in all growing areas, no matter the size of your garden/field.

Carol Ann (Knit_Chat)

From: Carol Ann (Knit_Chat)

10/9/09

Thanks for all that info, Paul. I will pass it along to my hubby...he's the "farmer" in the family.
In reply toRe: msg 111
Paul (SNOTZALOT)

From: Paul (SNOTZALOT)

10/11/09

  • Edited 10/11/2009 8:11 am ET by Paul (SNOTZALOT)
Lyndy (Lyndy7)

From: Lyndy (Lyndy7)

10/11/09

that is a photo worthy of 'eat more chiken' :)
In reply toRe: msg 113
Paul (SNOTZALOT)

From: Paul (SNOTZALOT)

10/12/09

We have successfully over wintered a few spinach plants with out any protective cover. This year we are trying hoop houses over two rows of spinach.  This should be an interesting experiment. Here is one row with a heavy Agribon cover. Next month we'll install green house plastic. I guess we'll need to shovel a path to the garden to keep the snow off.


  • Edited 11/7/2009 8:23 am ET by Paul (SNOTZALOT)
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