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Do you ever cross party lines when voting?   The Serious You: Politics

Started Feb-13 by Showtalk; 1032 views.
Showtalk

Poll Question From Showtalk

Feb-13

Do you ever cross party lines when voting?
  • No, I vote straight down my party ticket6  votes
    33%
  • Seldom, but I might if my party doesn't have a candidate I support3  votes
    16%
  • Often. I vote for the best person for the job, not party6  votes
    33%
  • I don't belong to a party but I support one party2  votes
    11%
  • I don't belong to a party so I'm flexible0  votes
    0%
  • I skip voting for a race if I don't like a candidate0  votes
    0%
  • I don't vote every election0  votes
    0%
  • I don't vote0  votes
    0%
  • Other1  vote
    5%
No, I vote straight down my party ticket 
Seldom, but I might if my party doesn't have a candidate I support 
Often. I vote for the best person for the job, not party 
I don't belong to a party but I support one party 
I don't belong to a party so I'm flexible 
I skip voting for a race if I don't like a candidate 
I don't vote every election 
I don't vote 
Other 
ANNMTM

From: ANNMTM 

Feb-13

I have only crossed party lines once, some time ago.

Now, I would not vote for a  Republican even if he or she walked on water. I've pretty much felt that way since Reagan, but it is set in stone since Trump.

Ironically, the latest group in Washington makes me long for Nixon.

WWW3
Staff

From: WWW3 

Feb-14

In Presidential elections, I have voter Republican twice when I thought the Democratic candidate was the lesser of the two. 

In reply toRe: msg 2
Bike (URALTOURIST1)

From: Bike (URALTOURIST1) 

Feb-14

I see, so you find it perfectly OK to allow a known scoundrel to be elected in a contested county race if there were nothing but Republicans running?  In many county and local elections party choice is a dream, you had better vote for the best of the lot.  

Oh, and how do you sort out non-partisan candidates as in Florida where judges and school board and some other offices are specifically non-partisan?

In reply toRe: msg 3
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Feb-14

That used to be more common than it seems to be now.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Feb-14

What about states where all the candidates are Democrats? I read an analysis of California, where most candidates who advance to the top 2 are Democrats.  If the voter doesn’t want either one they have no other choices, so they either vote for one or don’t vote.  She is in CA so she may never even have a chance to consider a Republican, even if she was willing to vote for one.

ANNMTM

From: ANNMTM 

Feb-14

I'm in the San Francisco Bay area, so there is always a Dem running. It is possible under the new (ish) top two candidates go on the November ballot rule to have two R's the only choice, but it is highly unlikely where I live. In your scenario, I would figure out the best of the two by my standards, just as I do with two Dem choices. Highly unlikely in the current political climate here, however.
 

Re: non-partisan offices we vote for, the Dem party in CA sends out recommendations which identify the Dems running for office down to county level. City level stuff takes some work.

ETA: What Showtalk said. Hasn't happened yet, anyway. Read her post after I did mine.

  • Edited February 14, 2020 5:37 pm  by  ANNMTM
In reply toRe: msg 7
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Feb-14

I don’t think party affiliations should be revealed for nonpartisan race. It’s not supposed to matter or they would have them declare parties.  We had a school board election and a woman with no experience at all was voted in because of her party affiliation. She doesn’t work in the district or have children.  As it turns out she is terribly unqualified.  I don’t think she ever would have won if not for her job as a teacher and her political party.  I’m not sure why they felt that was important, but it basically ruined the election and the school board, and the district.  She is making choices for this district based on her work experience, in a very different type of district.  They have already made two very poor choices, which she pushed for. There are some decisions that should not ever be politically based.

ANNMTM

From: ANNMTM 

Feb-14

Well, judges and county supervisors come under non-partisan here, and I think it matters at least in those cases.

Given the current Secretary of Education, I can see why some would think it important. Your situation shows how it can be very bad.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Feb-14

It can. Each district is very different and they get different amounts of state money.  The rest has to be made up by the community.  She worked in the most affluent community around so what hers needs is very different from ours. 

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