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Are You Finding Empty Shelves Due to Pandemic Preparations?   The Consumer You: Marketplace

Started 3/9/20 by BWArtist; 6886 views.
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

4/19/20

I hate when I want to buy something locally and get it that day, only to do a local search and find only internet sales sites.  I end up calling all over to find an item in stock.

I finally had to order some Gaviscon Extra Strength antacid this past week because I never could get a straight answer as to whether or not a given store had it or not.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

4/20/20

How do they not know their own merchandise? Even before the pandemic, it was almost impossible to locate something with a phone call.  I didn’t like driving all around the city looking for one thing,when I could call first, find it was in stock and drive one place. It saves time and gas.  It’s even worse for those using public transportation.

They probably didn't have inventory linked properly to their on-line presence. They could learn some things from how Ebay and Amazon can find stuff almost anywhere. I'd guess that management didn't really understand what the I.T. department was really doing, and so they figured that was where they could cut corners because the old fogies running some store chains still don't understand the digital age.

This article explains a lot about how the human brain really can't keep up with the modern world: https://getpocket.com/explore/item/our-world-outsmarts-us   Social problems are fantastically complex, while human minds are severely under-engineered.

Like about 5 minutes ago I ordered some knife sharpeners, after finding that I no longer have a steady enough hand to really get a good sharp edge using an old fashioned whetstone, mostly because the angle is very hard to hold consistently from stroke to stroke while the sharpening jig, you let the machine hold the blade exactly in perfect alignment as you grind a keen edge.

I wasn't going to stand in line and then feel rushed in a store and have to "settle for" what happened to be there at the moment. So I'll have 3 different kinds of them by Saturday, so I can do some performance comparisons and if they all perform well, I'll put one in the field pack, another in the kitchen, and another in the shop.

Meanwhile, really large tools like an axe head, I can still sharpen quite well by hand because it's bigger and more massive so you can actually light up the edge and examine it under high magnification, or clamp it in the vise and then use a little jig to keep the plane of the stone exact so every stroke is consistent, much like the little machine will do with smaller blades.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

4/20/20

You do a lot of work yourself that the average person would pay someone else to do, or go without.  I don’t know when the last time was that I needed to sharpen a knife.

Everyone says I'm an odd duck like that, even others who also do a lot of things themselves.

I have never had a professional fiddle with my electrical, plumbing, or heating / air conditioning. I've been out here for about 36 years now. But I've done a lot of custom re-wiring, I re-plumbed the shower and eventually will splice in the bathroom sinks and bathtub into a grey water disposal that doesn't go into the septic tank - only the toilets at the moment.

When rodents did extensive wiring damage in the walls, I started replacing it with wiring in conduit, which the little teeth can't gnaw into. I showed some other people how to do it, and I know of at least 3 other people who have done the same thing. As an advantage, you can be more creative with the circuitry using conduit than you can with Romex wiring because if you really need 4 conductors, you can run 4 conductors. If you want to run 7 so you have 2 power circuits, the grounds and neutrals, plus wiring to stick a 3-way switch at each end and a light tapped in the middle, you can do it exactly that way. And if you use the next larger size conduit, such as if the electric code sets a fillage limit of, say, 6 wires in a 1/2 inch conduit, you run 3/4 inch instead, you now can easily add a new circuit along the same conduit without having to rip out a wall.

But yeah. The shop building is a unique kind of construction. I built it for about 1/3 the cost of a professionally done building, and it has withstood 85 mph sustained wind that flipped over some neighbors' improperly anchored trailers and wadded up a garden shed that the remnants were found about 1/2 mile away one windy day a few years ago.

It actually was only half finished when we had an awful wind come up one day. I protected the sheet metal still on the ground by parking a car on top of the stacks, then setting about 500 pounds worth of sand bags on each end of the long metal strips, and spent about an hour shoveling dirt on the rest of it to further weight it down and spoil the aerodynamics.

Meanwhile in that same storm, there was a big metal building under construction about 10 miles away. I learned about it on the evening news, as 40 foot long pieces of sheet metal were strewn for miles, and some of them impaled houses and cars. Essentially a lot of the materials were a total loss.

I probably have some pictures of the improvised "sled" I built out of scrap C purlin and some 30 foot pieces that became improvised rails to haul the sheets up onto the roof once the sides were up. It cost a heck of a lot less than what a crane would have cost to rent for the several days it took to put the roof together.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

4/21/20

Most of us can do some things but not everything.  You seem to have learned everything!

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