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Are you practicing safe grocery habits? SNP   The Healthy You: Health and Fitness Polls

Started Mar-27 by Showtalk; 3593 views.
Showtalk

Poll Question From Showtalk

Mar-27

Are you practicing safe grocery habits? SNP
  • Yes, I do everything he says4  votes
    17%
  • I'm trying but it's hard.8  votes
    34%
  • No, I draw the line at disinfecting food and packaging9  votes
    39%
  • I'm not sure0  votes
    0%
  • Other2  votes
    8%
Yes, I do everything he says 
I'm trying but it's hard. 
No, I draw the line at disinfecting food and packaging 
I'm not sure 
Other 
In reply toRe: msg 1
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Mar-27

PSA Safe Grocery Shopping in COVID-19 Pandemic - UPDATED!!!

PSA Safe Grocery Shopping in COVID-19 Pandemic - UPDATED!!! IMPORTANT EDIT FROM NIH DATA: COVID-19 LIVES ON CARDBOARD FOR 1 DAY. SEE SOURCES BELOW. This is t...

kizmet1

From: kizmet1 

Mar-27

I do better than he does. I do not buy produce that needs washing under normal circumstances. Only things that need to be peeled like fresh citrus. I buy fresh prepackaged chicken thighs and/or legs that are prepacked and sealed by machine. My fish comes prepacked on a tray. Will have to check on how and if it is touched by a butcher with disposable gloves.
Years ago, I loved to shop at the "as is" building of the Good Will. It is the last stop before going to a landfill or being sent overseas. I kept rubber gloves and old jacket in car just for shopping there. I saw tons of cloth bags given to seminar and convention goers and discarded so I started grabbing them up for groceries. This was when paper bags were being replaced by the cheap, easy to break ones used now. I must have at least 10. I like them as I can wash them.
A couple of years ago I discovered mylar bags and started buying those up for cold things. They can be washed by hand. Last but not least, I got cloth laundry bags at WM as I take public transportation and don't want everyone (some homeless) to see what I bought. Everything goes into my giant bags.
That chef is setting a bad example by using those flimsy disposable bags. We have to pay 5 cents per bag at many stores now.
  • Edited March 27, 2020 4:22 pm  by  kizmet1
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Mar-27

He is a doctor and most states allow plastic bags.  He said the plastic packaging could have the virus on it, but what is inside is probably safe.  The virus apparently can’t live long on cooked food. I don’t know why.

kizmet1

From: kizmet1 

Mar-27

I prefer my reusable, washable, cloth bags.
Those grocery store bags are horrible. Hold nothing heavy and certainly not a large package of chicken or hamburger and some tear before making it to a garbage can.
Kid (Kidmagnet)

From: Kid (Kidmagnet) 

Mar-31

Our stores have banned reusable bags during the pandemic but you can skip bagging and do it yourself in your car. (I know you don;t drive so thats a general "you" you)

Kid (Kidmagnet)

From: Kid (Kidmagnet) 

Mar-31

6:30 and I am stopping (I scanned some of that first bit too.

Problems

1. People over 60 should not go into stores but have their loved ones shop for them.

Who are we all the Waltons? How many reading this are 60 or over and there is not loved one close by that is shopping for you? Blanket statements like that irk me. I see elderly people shopping much less than I used to, but I still see them. And people in their 60's are often taking care of their parents.

2. Plan to shop for two weeks at a time.

Excellent advice if you live in a well stocked, not ravished by horders to the point 6 months of stock was deleted in a week area. Also items are being rationed so - one jug of milk, one carton of eggs and limited meat are not going to feed the family for more than a few days. Oops- gotta go back out and shop for my elderly parents (who are 60 and working from home) and my grandparents who are in their 80's but now I have to do those two trips separately because of store limits. Then sanitized 3 sets of groceries. And being a single parent I am not sure where my kids are right now... 

3. WHY would you put the bags on the counter? My daughter does all this in their carport with a parent removing outer packaging without touching the inner one (note he putted the cereal bag out of the box after touching the box with both hands. The set the inner bag on the "clean side" FAIL, but that's ok this is HARD.) and the children removing the inner bags or sanitized items to the house where the second parent puts them away. Her stepsons have always been involved with household chores so "they've got this!"

So anyway...

I sanitized things like the milk/juice jugs,  and other things but with boxes I just put them to the back of the cupboard. We're needing to shop way more often because of shortages and limits. I can easily keep up on often used pantry items and let them sit until needed.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Mar-31

We already had supplies for acts of nature.  I thought everyone did. Canned and frozen food, water in case the water supply is contaminated, and a few min the of paper products and dog food. Everyone who has an extra cupboard or a garage or storage should.

He made some mistakes and he was speaking from his own experience. Adult children don’t usually live with parents and may not be able to shop for them. My neighbor is 94 and her husband is 90. They have a huge family and none live in this state.  I called to see what she needed and she said nothing, her neighbors are shopping and cooking for them.  That is rare, but she is a very good person and neighbor and everyone loves her. She is lucky.

One of those article I put up (I thnk I posted it here) said we are very unlikely to get this from food packaging so it’s a little over the top to wash and scrub everything. 

Kid (Kidmagnet)

From: Kid (Kidmagnet) 

Mar-31

Showtalk said:

We already had supplies for acts of nature. I thought everyone did. Canned and frozen food, water in case the water supply is contaminated, and a few min the of paper products and dog food. Everyone who has an extra cupboard or a garage or storage should.

Excellent and good for you. Yes we all should. Are you using these now and have been totally avoiding stores? That's great Showtalk. We're still shopping mostly for fresh foods, milk etc. We really should not be but I guess being the stores are open we will continue. How long can you guys get by on those? I've not broken into the true survival foods because with other food still available eating those (and drinking the water) would mean we have nothing if this gets long and ugly.

Sorry I did not watch the whole video.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Mar-31

You don’t need to watch the whole thing.  I’m currently using everything that expires in 2020.  If it’s past the date, I use it first.  Those dates are a guide not an absolute.  I prefer not to use most canned food, but I have tuna expiring in May.  I also have a lot of pasta, canned vegetables, jars of fruit and a lot of cartons of broth.  So I can make soup which seems like fresh food rather than canned. Lots of canned chili.  I could not get any fresh produce two weeks ago except cabbage and mandarin oranges.  So I cooked with cabbage and shredded it for salad.  Last week I found carrots, tomatoes and other vegetables.  I can’t find eggs, but I got liquid egg in a carton.  I don’t love all that but I’m making do.  We all have to adapt for the greater good.

I didn’t start saving food because I thought I’d need it.  I began because our local community insisted on it. Our law enforcement sends out mailings to be prepared and if there is an emergency, we could be on our own for weeks. They scared us into it.  Maybe this will scare everyone into preparing in advance.

One article calls it hoarding.  I disagree. 

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