Opinion Polls: Delphi's Polling Place

Hosted by Cstar1

Opinion polls on all subjects. Opinions? Heck yes, we have opinions - but we're *always* nice about it, even when ours are diametrically opposed to yours. Register your vote today!

  • 3925
    MEMBERS
  • 65116
    MESSAGES
  • 42
    POSTS TODAY

Discussions

Are you practicing safe grocery habits? SNP   The Healthy You: Health and Fitness Polls

Started Mar-27 by Showtalk; 3589 views.
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Apr-12

Oh, so it’s not that dangerous, then.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Apr-12

I just need mine to check things. What a good idea! It’s like a phone glove.

Yeah, it's pretty safe unless you start eating them like they were M&Ms (Benadryl), and of course you can overdose on just about anything - even water (google for "Hold your wee for a wii" to read about a fatal overdose of water).

I'm actually a lot more afraid of Tylenol - the window between a dosage that actually relieves pain and inflammation is frightfully close to the overdose level.

What makes it particularly dangerous is that the overdose threshold is more like a tripwire connected to a mine. As long as you don't hit the wire, you're safe. But just like a booby trap, if you go over that invisible dosage limit, it pushes the livers' self-destruct button.

Naproxen (Aleve) or ibuprophen (Motrin) at least to me seem to be a lot more forgiving of dosage, and then I have never gotten any noticeable relief from acetaminophen (Tylenol).

I have heard that a cocktail of acetaminophen and ibuprophen together has a painkilling effect as potent as an opioid without the high or addiction potential. Some people I know who suffer from fibromyalgia and rheumatoid arthritis swear by that as a way to get through a really bad day when doctors are afraid to prescribe enough actual opioids such as hydrocodone or oxycodone to knock the pain down when it's really bad.

Aspirin , while a really old standby, is still quite effective as an analgesic and anti-inflammatory. It has a much more pronounced side effect of inhibiting blood clotting.

This is exploited as a low dose prophylactic for people who are taking medication for cholesterol / triglycerides to lower the risk of heart attack and ischemic stroke.

Also, the American Heart Association recommends that if you suspect you might be having the early stages of a heart attack, to crush a 325 mg aspirin to a powder and swallow it quickly in addition to calling 911.

The aspirin getting into the blood stream quickly will slow down the formation of blood vessel obstructing clots enough that it improves the odds the ambulance can get to you before so much heart muscle damage is done that you go into cardiac arrest. Thus, while it won't truly stop or reverse a heart attack in progress, it can slow down the damage enough to greatly improve the odds of surviving.

Then these days, most ambulances have clot busting drugs that can open up a clogged artery and essentially restore circulation to the oxygen starved muscle.

So anyone who has gotten old enough to be at risk for these kind of problems should keep aspirin on hand.

Of course an overdose of aspirin is well known to inhibit clotting enough that a minor injury can lead to hemorrhage, but it is far more forgiving than the heavier duty blood thinners like warfarin (which is commonly used as rat poison). Those kind of clot inhibitors need very close monitoring and careful dosage titration to inhibit clots while not triggering a major bleed.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Apr-13

I never use Tylenol. I bought it because they said to have it on hand. I also got a small bottle of aspirin, which I never use either. 

Because they said to have it on hand, out here the shelf spaces for it are bare, so obtaining it is probably not going to happen for the forseeable future. But production might eventually catch up, so ordering it online might score some of it sometime between Memorial Day and July 4th.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Apr-13

By then you won’t need it.

unless there is a late resurgence in cases.

Or unless one can build a time machine and go back to about July 2019 to buy a couple of big bottles to stash until the present :)

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Apr-13

It would be expiring about now or very soon.

Kid (Kidmagnet)

From: Kid (Kidmagnet) 

Apr-13

Yup - my list is on my phone as well. I do give my phone a once a day clean with a spritz of rubbing alcohol but to do that many times a day when it's corrosive... something I'd like to avoid.

Expiring in less than a year?

I have seen most OTC meds have a sell by date about 2 years in the future when I saw them on the shelves pre-virus.

The US Army did a series of experiments concerning actual medication degradation in storage over time, that started during the liberation of Kuwait in the First Gulf War.

It has been going on since 1991, and they discovered that the vast majority of pills retain their potency for decades, and also don't decompose into toxic byproducts.

They did the experiment because they were wasting billions in medications from stockpiles because when a war breaks out, the long manufacturing lead times can be far too long when "Attention all personnel - incoming wounded" is announced.

I think there were only about 3 out of about 1,000 medications tested that deteriorated enough to be concerned with when temperature cycled from about room temperature to nearly 130 degrees F to simulate field combat storage conditions in Iraq and parts of Afghanistan, and only one that is normally only administered in a surgical setting that deteriorated and transformed to something that could cause adverse effects.

The rest retained enough potency to still be effective even 25 years later.

TOP