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More sectors of Layoffs   The Newsy You: News of Today

Started Apr-14 by Jeri (azpaints); 1834 views.
Showtalk said:

I noticed that developmentally delayed students get classes in social skills. How to shop, how to count change, how to do laundry and clean, how to use a stove top. Everyone should learn basic skills.

Yes. And if one doesn't get labeled "developmentally delayed", the system just assumes that they learned these skills by osmosis. But I ran out of fingers and toes to count the people I have met who really had to figure these things out well into their late 20s, even in their 30s.

And yep, Millennials are quite good at job hopping, but I think the environment where they grew up likely has exacerbated that tendency. So they are a much more mobile generation, but that also means far fewer of them put down roots, or see themselves as part of the community they happen to live in this week.

I saw the neighbors across the road with a U-haul pulled up to the door on Sunday, but this morning early there was one pickup truck and one car there.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Apr-20

Some of their attitudes are due to the school and education systems.  The people teaching them aren’t much older and their ideas permeate and drip down to their students.  Same with college professors. But social media has had a huge influence, and not a good one.  

Showtalk said:

Some of their attitudes are due to the school and education systems. The people teaching them aren’t much older and their ideas permeate and drip down to their students. Same with college professors. But social media has had a huge influence, and not a good one.

I agree there. It takes time to develop real wisdom, and social media produces an echo chamber where they only talk to each other and the platforms then filter out any competing ideas quite effectively. So like depending only on a magnetic compass to navigate when there is also a magnetic disturbance nearby, they get more and more off course, and don't know it, kind of like what modern researchers think happened to Flight 19 in the Bermuda Triangle many decades ago.

With no external and radically different navigational tools at their disposal, or a rejection of any of those that don't agree with what they expect, they still end up getting lost at sea and run out of fuel hundreds of miles from land and far from where any search parties would go looking for them. While I was taught early on that if you properly set your gyro compass while lined up on the taxiway, then it should stay rock solid throughout the flight. If it and the magnetic compass differs by more than about 5 degrees, you start checking against the map and stuff on the ground. 2 out of the 3 navigation checks should agree. And if it is at night, you find the major constellations, and ideally Polaris and take a couple of sightings to confirm.

to use an aviation / nautical navigation analogy to the Millennials' path through life. Although admittedly, the modern world has turned into unexplored territory in many aspects, and like being lost in the Bermuda Triangle, the sun or stars may not be visible at all, the compass might be spinning around, the fuel gauges are still dropping, and there is no land anywhere in sight.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Apr-20

Following your tangent, I read an excellent alternative do,a nation for the Bermuda Triangle a few years go, and now can’t remember what it was to research it.  But at the time, it seemed completely plausible.

My theory about the Bermuda Triangle:

The region has notoriously unpredictable weather. If you look at historical tropical depression, tropical storm, and hurricane tracks since we had satellites to track them, the weather is incredibly treacherous.

Second there is a lot of air and surface traffic. So with that many ships, yachts, and aircraft crossing the region, it's just a lot more games of Russian Roulette being played with the weather than, say, over central Kansas, where if a storm brings down an aircraft, eventually they will find wreckage, since it's not going to sink to the sea floor shortly after impact.

Fun fact - they excavated a small ship in an Iowa (or Nebraska?) cornfield that sank about 150 years ago, then the river buried it in silt and the course meandered a couple of miles away.

Then there are the casualties of "illegal" ocean voyages, such as, say, inner tubes being rowed from Cuba to Key West, but a change in wind and underestimating the speed of the Gulf Stream sweeping them into the vast Atlantic, maybe becoming shark food early into the voyage, or "los narcotraficantes" - which in one book about the Triangle, "put profits first, secrecy next, and safety last". Thus there are plenty of marginally seaworthy and airworthy craft that attempted to cross these waters from 1959 until the development of more advanced radar at new wavelengths that can allegedly (exact performance remains highly classified) spot a small ice chest washed off a boat barely bobbing out of the waves from some 50 miles away.

Of course now the incredibly intense air and sea surveillance around South Florida has cut the number of alleged disappearances down dramatically, and new computer modeling of current and wind conditions has resulted in rescues that just 20 years ago would have been considered totally impossible.

One dramatic incident that put the Coast Guard's new drift object modeling in the spotlight involved a very drunk passenger on a cruise ship that evidently staggered too close to the railing and just pitched right over it, plunging some 10 stories to the ocean.

Several people happened to see him stumble over the side and promptly raised the alarm. The ship then pressed a button on the bridge that marked the GPS track of the ship going back to a few seconds before he went over the side, and uploaded that to the Coast Guard. A big ship like that takes many miles to stop, and a LOT of time to return to a spot in the ocean back along its track.

The Coast Guard plugged in the 60 second track and threw a radio equipped buoy (I think that's what they did) essentially a dummy with an estimated size and weight of the passenger, to get a quick drift vector, fed that into their computer modeling, and quickly narrowed the most likely (and still moving with current) search area.

The dude survived the impact with the water and was kind of obese, so he floated pretty good. No life jacket or other survival gear, they actually found him alive, and the relatively warm tropical water saved him from the fate of many Titanic passengers a century earlier who got off the ship only to quickly succumb to hypothermia in the icy water before rescue.

Also, magnetic anomalies are now quite well known in the Triangle. Many of the larger ones have been mapped using modern instruments, aboard drones and drift buoys also using GPS to pin down exact true speed and direction versus compass readings. None of this was known when Flight 19 vanished, or when several search and rescue aircraft also vanished.

Another rarely known about  phenomena until recently with proliferation of digital video recording equipment and the ability to live-stream through satellites, is the rogue wave. These are when an unlucky confluence of many smaller waves creates a truly gigantic crest and incredibly deep trough that can exceed 150 feet. This is more than enough to over-stress many vessels, especially those that are somewhat longer than the wavelength. A large portion of the hull can be essentially suspended over empty space for a few seconds while the entire mass of the ship is borne by the bow and stern. Often this will just outright submerge both ends, while the dynamic forces can crack the hull in two.

Also some of that water is surprisingly shallow, even significant distances from land, and it is possible for the trough of a rogue wave minus the draft of the ship to be less than the water depth, so it just slams one end or the other into the bottom, ripping a huge hole in the hull. Without the rogue wave the ship would not have been in any danger of running aground. Then there are regions where the depths drop off very fast, so the ship is badly damaged, remains afloat for a few minutes, and finally sinks in very deep water maybe a mile or so away.

Such a sudden and violent event can catch a crew by surprise and cause injuries sufficient that a distress call is not possible to be made in time.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Apr-21

That may be what I read, about a violent storm event confined to a very small area.

Showtalk said:

That may be what I read, about a violent storm event confined to a very small area.

That's my theory of what happened in quite a few disappearances.

Fun fact - while searching for wreckage of the space shuttle Challenger, divers recovered a couple of lost packages of cocaine from the seabed that were apparently lost maybe years earlier, still sealed but marine critters had started colonizing it like they do any other artificial object that ends up on the seabed.

And an amazing amount of contraband is found washed ashore by beachcombers every year, among other assorted flotsam. Although these days the #1 thing that washes ashore is the staggering amount of plastic waste that has turned the oceans into a huge floating garbage patch.

Then there are the bits of glass that have eroded into rounded shapes that some people actually collect and make into jewelry and artwork.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Apr-22

Things can turn up in soil too. A friend was digging around in her yard for lack of anything else to do, and uncovered a tiny statue wrapped in an old decaying piece of fabric.

The BBC has a whole series of documentaries called "Digging for Britain". People find all sorts of bonafide antiquities all the time there, because, well, Britain has been settled for millennia, while most of North America has had no really permanent settlements prior to the early 1500s, although there are some Viking artifacts going to around the 1st millennium, and indigenous artifacts that have been carbon dated to at least the previous Ice Age.

But in any place that has been previously settled, maybe old houses torn down, new subdivisions built, in many places stuff from the agrarian early settlements through the Depression era do sometimes turn up.

My place was apparently uninhabited right up until the old ranch estate was sold off a section at a time, and even then I occasionally found stuff while out walking around, with the oldest artifacts going back to the late 19th century related to cattle ranching.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Apr-22

New subdivisions now contain pottery pieces and bones from nomadic tribes.  Then they have to decide if it’s a real burial ground, in which case they can’t build, or if it’s random, so then they can,

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