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What kind of mask do you wear when you have to come in proximity to others?   The Healthy You: Health and Fitness Polls

Started May-14 by $1,661.87 in cats (ROCKETMAN_S); 4167 views.
$1,661.87 in cats (ROCKETMAN_S)

Poll Question From $1,661.87 in cats (ROCKETMAN_S)

May-14

What kind of mask do you wear when you have to come in proximity to others?
  • A genuine N95 mask (please elaborate how you got them)1  vote
    4%
  • A surgical mask, or other "official" medical grade mask other than N959  votes
    42%
  • Improvised from terry cloth, microfiber, multi layer T shirt, etc.5  votes
    23%
  • single layer cloth mask such as bandana, handkerchief / neckerchief, shirt, e...1  vote
    4%
  • Plague doctor beak mask, storm trooper / Darth Vader helmet, or other cosplay0  votes
    0%
  • World War 1 type gas mask0  votes
    0%
  • swimming mask with or without snorkel0  votes
    0%
  • industrial SCBA or firefighter breathing apparatus0  votes
    0%
  • umbrella / shower curtain, toy space suit, or similar device0  votes
    0%
  • SCUBA mouthpiece with regulator and tanks (wet suit and fins optional)0  votes
    0%
  • Level IV containment type full body suit0  votes
    0%
  • Aviation pressure suit or other pressurized suit including actual NASA equipm...0  votes
    0%
  • I don't wear a mask because that's for wusses, or don't believe virus is real2  votes
    9%
  • disposable diaper, maxipad, or similar item0  votes
    0%
  • the obligatory other3  votes
    14%
A genuine N95 mask (please elaborate how you got them) 
A surgical mask, or other "official" medical grade mask other than N95 
Improvised from terry cloth, microfiber, multi layer T shirt, etc. 
single layer cloth mask such as bandana, handkerchief / neckerchief, shirt, e... 
Plague doctor beak mask, storm trooper / Darth Vader helmet, or other cosplay 
World War 1 type gas mask 
swimming mask with or without snorkel 
industrial SCBA or firefighter breathing apparatus 
umbrella / shower curtain, toy space suit, or similar device 
SCUBA mouthpiece with regulator and tanks (wet suit and fins optional) 
Level IV containment type full body suit 
Aviation pressure suit or other pressurized suit including actual NASA equipm... 
I don't wear a mask because that's for wusses, or don't believe virus is real 
disposable diaper, maxipad, or similar item 
the obligatory other 
In reply toRe: msg 1

I saw just about all of these in the peopleofwalmart.com pictures taken since the pandemic outbreak.

I saw hazmat suits, an umbrella with a shower curtain around it, and people wearing swim masks and breathing through a snorkel (like how is that going to filter out anything) and even a couple inside cosplay inflated space suit like things (which might actually offer some real protection since they are mildly positive pressure).

I saw a picture of someone in a Darth Vader mask, an Imperial Storm Trooper outfit, and someone wearing an industrial SCBA with tank on another site, as well as someone in full scuba gear complete with flippers pushing a shopping cart like on his way back to the Calypso to dive on another shipwreck.

And most of the other things have been apparently sighted, including of course the beaked mask replica from the plague doctors of the 1300s, and more than one specimen of a World War 1 gas mask, and some of the Israeli 1980s era gas masks, whose filters might actually stop an awful lot of crap in the air from getting to the lungs. I have a dozen of those from circa 1987 that worked well until dry rot slowly killed the rubber. The canisters are still sealed so they might very well be quite effective after 33 years in storage.

So - if you have *seen* anything really weird or cool people were wearing, be sure and post those too.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

May-14

That is so hilarious.  I haven’t voted yet.  Would mine be a surgical mask? I got it for woodworking. It is a white cup shape with metal at the nosepiece and with elastic that goes over the back of my head,

omg - I completely forgot to put woodworking masks. I'd count those like an "ordinary" medical mask. Or just "Other".

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

May-14

It’s like a medical mask. In some ways it’s better because it’s designed to keep fine dust out,

Depends on the particle size.

Wood dust is in the tens to hundreds of microns in size. 1000 microns is 1mm, and I'd guess that most fine dust is in the 10 to 50 micron range, which at the largest is near the threshold of what can be seen with the naked eye and 20/20 vision, although some articles put that limit at more like 100 microns.

Bacteria are usually from about 1 to 10 microns, while viruses are in the 0.005 to 0.050 microns, or about 5 to 50 nanometers. This is smaller than the wavelength of visible light, which is why no one ever imaged viruses with an optical microscope, and the electron microscope had to be invented before they could be actually imaged.

The pores on a woodworking mask will stop larger bacteria, virus laden droplets, etc. and mostly keep you from touching your face with fingers.

And all of them stop the droplets shot from your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze that has a muzzle velocity of up to 50 meters per second in some cases. It gives the cloud of snot something to collide with rather than just travel freely across the room to be inhaled by the vulnerable people to catch whatever pathogen you just launched.

Essentially this ability to image sizes has to do with the dual wave / particle behavior of matter, and electrons effectively have a much tinier effective wavelength - on the order of x and gamma radiation, but without the penetration that makes imaging using this kind of radiation impossible on tiny, fragile structures.

https://www.va.gov/DIAGNOSTICEM/What_Is_Electron_Microscopy_and_How_Does_It_Work.asp

... Electron Microscopes (EMs) function like their optical counterparts except that they use a focused beam of electrons instead of photons to "image" the specimen and gain information as to its structure and composition.

The basic steps involved in all EMs: 

  • A stream of high voltage electrons (usually 5-100 KeV) is formed by the Electron Source (usually a heated tungsten or field emission filament) and accelerated in a vacuum toward the specimen using a positive electrical potential.

  • This stream is confined and focused using metal apertures and magnetic lenses into a thin, focused, monochromatic beam.

  • This beam is focused onto the sample using a magnetic lens.

  • Interactions occur inside the irradiated sample, affecting the electron beam.

  • These interactions and effects are detected and transformed into an image.

At the end of the 19th Century, physicists realized that the only way to improve on the light microscope was to use radiation of a much shorter wavelength. J.J. Thompson in 1897 discovered the electron; others considered its wave-like properties.  In 1924, Louis deBroglie demonstrated that a beam of electrons traveling in a vacuum behaves as a form of radiation of very short wavelength, but it was Ernst Ruska who made the leap to use these wave-like properties of electrons to construct the first EM and to improve on the light microscope. ...

https://www.scienceabc.com/innovation/what-is-an-electron-microscope-how-does-it-work.html

... An electron microscope can magnify an object up to 10,000,000 times! That is 5,000 times more than what a light microscope can achieve. Electron microscopes use the magnetic properties of electrons, in conjunction with Louis de Broglie’s hypothesis that electrons possess wave properties, to augment magnification to a whole new level. ... The wavelength of an electron is up to 100,000 times smaller than visible light, a characteristic that makes for excellent resolution. This is because the particles of shorter wavelengths tend to penetrate objects more deeply, thereby providing a view of things beneath the surface – a basketball cannot pass through a slit that is the size of a tennis ball. ...

https://www.explainthatstuff.com/electronmicroscopes.html

... Seeing with photons is fine if you want to look at things that are much bigger than atoms. But if you want to see things that are smaller, photons turn out to be pretty clumsy and useless. Just imagine if you were a master wood carver, renowned the world over for the finely carved furniture you made. To carve such fine details, you'd need small, sharp, precise tools smaller than the patterns you wanted to make. If all you had were a sledgehammer and a spade, carving intricate furniture would be impossible. The basic rule is that the tools you use have to be smaller than the things you're using them on. ...

... An ordinary light microscope uses photons of light, which are equivalent to waves with a wavelength of roughly 400–700 nanometers. That's fine for studying something like a human hair, which is about 100 times bigger (50,000–100,000 nanometers in diameter). But what about a bacteria that's 200 nanometers across or a protein just 10 nanometers long? If you want to see finely detailed things that are "smaller than light" (smaller than the wavelength of photons), you need to use particles that have an even shorter wavelength than photons: in other words, you need to use electrons. As you probably know, electrons are the minute charged particles that occupy the outer regions of atoms. (They're also the particles that carry electricity around circuits.) In an electron microscope, a stream of electrons takes the place of a beam of light. An electron has an equivalent wavelength of just over 1 nanometer, which allows us to see things smaller even than light itself (smaller than the wavelength of light's photons). ...

https://science.howstuffworks.com/scanning-electron-microscope.htm

... For one thing, scientists had pushed optical microscopes to their limits. Optical microscopes had been around for centuries, and while you can still find them in classrooms across the country, their dependence on
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kizmet1

From: kizmet1 

May-14

Can you post a picture of your mask? I just found a blue plastic one that seems to be very pointed on the end, like for a mole. It needs some sort of cloth or paper over it and it used to have straps that stretched behind the head. I don't know if it is leftover from when my mother had surgery many, many years ago or if I bought it to get ready to spray paint or refinish furniture.
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

May-14

Then I need to carry one of those with me to test droplet sizes. Or I would if I was not joking.

Kid (Kidmagnet)

From: Kid (Kidmagnet) 

May-14

As long as it does not have the piece that exhausted your breath. Remember the point of wearing non medical masks is to protect others from you.

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