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Are you Comfortable with Trump taking Malaria Drug?   The Serious You: Politics

Started May-18 by BWArtist; 4530 views.
Jeri (azpaints)

From: Jeri (azpaints) 

Jul-14

Pope Francis, and it's also a song?  ETA:  I thought it was Kennedy or Reagan, so I googled.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Jul-14

It was an HRC.

Jeri (azpaints)

From: Jeri (azpaints) 

Jul-14

Actually, it was Martin Luther King, Jr first.

Well, it was really a case of enforcing existing building codes after the hurricane totally exposed decades of slipshod construction. If I remember correctly, some housecleaning happened in the building inspection departments in South Florida, which included some re-vamping of the permit and inspection cycle to make it very difficult for construction to evade strict enforcement of the hurricane codes.

They also mandated certain additional structural reinforcements and banned other types of construction that fails to stay together under extreme wind and debris loading. One thing I saw when we were down there for a couple of weeks 20 years ago, was the internal concrete shear walls that have a lot of welded rebar required internally to hold everything together.

There are also "hurricane ties" that are steel plates they mandate that connect walls to roofs, and walls to floors, and keep studs anchored to top and bottom plates.

Essentially they tightened up building code enforcement.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Jul-15

Yes, they can’t go back and demand all old construction be brought up to new standards.  That happened in Earthquake prone areas.  The standards apply to new construction and remodels, but people with old buildings weren’t expected to completely tear down and start over.  They allowed retrofitting when possible, going back and shoring up old construction.

Showtalk said:

they can’t go back and demand all old construction be brought up to new standards. That happened in Earthquake prone areas. The standards apply to new construction and remodels, but people with old buildings weren’t expected to completely tear down and start over. They allowed retrofitting when possible, going back and shoring up old construction

Then once a disaster - e.g. hurricane, flooding, massive earthquake, EF-5 tornado, wipes the neighborhood off of the map, or turns it into just a bunch of rows of foundations surrounded by rubble, and the old structures are considered a total loss, the tear down was done by Mother Nature. So any starting over would have to meet new standards because there wasn't anything really left to shore up.

Often that results in places returning to nature. Two examples I have seen are in Wichita Falls, and in Monahans.

Some places were too badly damaged to shore up and rebuild, and for decades after those events you could drive though certain neighborhoods and see a mix of new houses, some old houses that had been repaired, and vacant lots with concrete foundations and stubs of damaged plumbing still sticking up through the weeds and grass.

The latter were where damage was too extensive to rebuild and those were not insured with replacement coverage (which is impossible to get these days but was common, although expensive, in the 1970s)

Of course there's similar patterns on a larger scale seen in the Miami / Homestead area of south Florida, and other places like Joplin, MO, or other places that there was not an economic boom that produced buyers for distressed properties.

In Monahans, there were vacant lots still swept bare, and collapsed buildings that sat for over 30 years, as the 30 year anniversary rolled around in 2007. But by 2017 the oil boom had hit and every single bit of habitable property in Ward County was occupied. Many newly wealthy (or suddenly with a high income who were living in their trucks) now could go bid on property abandoned for decades at auction, and build something new on it.

Where one warehouse foundation stood swept bare from 1977 to about 2013, suddenly a 4 story hotel sprouted and grew on the site. The bare several blocks between I-20 and 15th Street, from Betty, Alice, and Main streets through Allen, Bruce, and Calvin streets suddenly transformed from scrub brush into many blocks of brand new houses. All those streets were extended to meet the I-20 frontage road. 16th, 17th, 18th, and 19th streets magically extended into this previously vacant roughly 80 acres as well.

Today though, with the boom gone bust again combined with the double whammy of the coronavirus, now we see some parts of the town look almost like a ghost town.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Jul-15

Yes, a lot of places were not rebuilt. People had to start over somewhere else, often with nothing.

Showtalk said:

Yes, a lot of places were not rebuilt. People had to start over somewhere else, often with nothing.

parts of New Orleans after Katrina in 2005. Many places still stand abandoned, never rebuilt. I knew someone active in various forums (now deceased since maybe 2007) who was uprooted from New Orleans when Katrina hit. They pretty much had nothing but the clothes on their back, and it disrupted ongoing medical treatment. When we heard she had died, the consensus was it was an indirect fatality of Katrina, due to forced relocation, loss of livelihood and thus loss of health coverage which resulted in missed chemo sessions while assorted bureaucrats fiddled.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Jul-15

It happened to a lot of displaced people.

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