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Are you Comfortable with Trump taking Malaria Drug?   The Serious You: Politics

Started May-18 by BWArtist; 2718 views.
Jeri (azpaints)

From: Jeri (azpaints) 

May-25

I don't go there unless a news article mentions one and I think it can't be true.  I don't like it because so many are fake names and a lot of them are bots.  Remember the discussion onDelphi about bots on Zeta?  I don't remember for sure but I think they are allowed?  

MEDDLY

From: MEDDLY 

May-25

Other:

I really don't care what he does, he's an Attention Whore.

Conditionally. He's the one taking the risk if something goes really wrong. I'm not a doctor and don't play one on TV, so it's tough to say whether it's plain old reckless, or if it's like some circus acts that while can have something horribly go wrong, it's a relatively controlled risk that looks more breathtaking than the true danger.

Still it has the feel of someone saying they aren't scared of the 1,500 foot drop on a cliff, so they stand right on the precipice with no safety line, holding a camera on a selfie stick, then for good measure, stand on one leg, in a gusting wind.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

May-25

They could be bots.  I don’t really remember the Zeta uproar.  I tried to stay positive about the change and it worked.

Jeri (azpaints)

From: Jeri (azpaints) 

May-25

LOL... As I've said, I'm a classic kind of girl.  

BWArtist

From: BWArtist 

May-26

I guess it comes down to what a fella wants to put his trust in.

Speaking of malaria, I heard that certain tropical resorts, devoid of tourists and going bankrupt, now have mosquitoes breeding in un-maintained swimming pools by the billions, as they depend on the annual infusion of tourist dollars in the vacation season (or in British, holiday) for most of the population to live on for the entire year.

Losing the tourism season means many of these will plunge into 3rd world poverty, and get a double whammy of mosquito borne illness on top of everything else falling apart.

All around the world, those on the lower ends of the socio-economic spectrum may suffer far more casualties from starvation and crime as their whole economic food chain collapses.

Other parts of ecosystems around the world where much teeming wildlife depends on tourists leaving trash and thus scraps out, are now having die-offs, pointing out a lot of interdependencies that were not that well known outside of a tiny number of people who study such things.

The ripple effects of all the various Covid-19 shutdowns around the world reveal a lot more little cogs and wheels that generally are not mentioned in the executive summary of what an economic shutdown really would do, and these secondary and tertiary effects might very well be far more damaging and longer lasting in the long term than the big effects that are immediate and obvious.

Some of those may come back around to cause more human suffering precisely because so many things around the globe are now far too interdependent for proper resilience.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

May-26

Yes, the effects will be far reaching for a long time.

One of the things that I kind of hope will be in the fallout, is far fewer "hyperexploited" people trying to cobble together an existence above the poverty level in the gig economy with no benefits. That trend of hollowing out the middle class, where even many with a master's degree or doctorate under the age of 30 have a very difficult time making a living wage, was never sustainable.

Or as one pundit wrote recently, in the 1950s, people bought washing machines so they could spend less time washing clothes and more time doing the things they enjoyed, while enabling washing machine assembly line workers the means to buy a washing machine of their own. Today, people buy washing machines because the old one crapped out a week after the warranty expired and it enables the owners of the washing machine company to buy a new jet to go with their mega-yacht.

Because the washing machines were built by robots, no workers benefit from the new paradigm.

Because they are intentionally designed to fail after a pre-set amount of time from forced obsolescence instead of building either to last or to be repairable, hapless consumers are thus forced to throw away the one that may have had a 50 cent capacitor fail somewhere.

Then the deliberate lack of documentation and tamper resistant construction, even someone with an engineering degree from MIT and a well equipped laboratory for hacking and cracking hardware and reverse engineering software would be sorely challenged to expend less than 10x to 20x the man-hours that would be required to earn enough to just throw the whole thing away and buy a new one.

All of these trends have mostly left a gigantic pool of un(der)utilized talent and expertise and excluded vast segments of the population from a real chance to prosper compared to how when I was a kid, anyone with ambition and who wasn't just ne'er-do-well lazy to the bone, could at least get to a middle class lifestyle, and the vast majority of people with only a high school education could go to work and support a family of 4 with a modest house in a safe neighborhood with a lawn and picket fence and room to play Frisbee with the dog.

Those days are long gone for the average person, and now we have many approaching middle age who have never in their life known the kind of prosperity which we have experienced in our lives. Quite the opposite - many, if not most, under the age of 40 have struggled just to make any of the transitions from adolescence to adulthood, not necessarily from fragility of character or a childhood of growing up bubble-wrapped, but a slow paradigm shift in how goods and services are done that no longer gives much opportunity to a growing majority of the population.

As I told someone this past weekend, these trends do not bode well for the future. We late middle aged folk are looking at a shrinking number of people ever getting to a high enough tax bracket to pay enough into the system to support us when we finally get too old and feeble to remain employable. We cling to our jobs precisely because to just about everywhere, we're considered over the hill and obsolete, which also means the younger generations often don't get to climb the ladder of success - and more and more often, are unable to reach the first rung.

Such situations, throughout history, are highly destabilizing to a peaceful civilization. The end result is traditionally some kind of revolution, and Communism or something like that, begins to hold a lot of appeal to those who have never tasted the fruits of success from their hard work, who are still living hand to mouth even decades after their parents or grandparents had long ago climbed out of poverty.

Because under Communism and its "lite" brother, socialism, pretty much everyone (except for the politicians and bureaucrats, who are "speshul") is equal - equally poor, equally lacking personal freedom, equally spied upon, equally likely to disappear to a re-education camp if they don't parrot the Party line, but for most of the life of such a regime, as long as the proletariat have some kind of certainty, these regimes can last for quite a while.

I fear that is where the US is headed. I'm kind of hoping the Coronavirus has awakened some people as to just how awful things could go. And I hope that deglobalization may at least put much of America back to work again, where the 90% who cannot graduate in the top 10 percentile, have a place in the economy of the future other than sidelined dependent on the government dole for survival because all of their skills have been replaced by automation, by closed architecture systems that defy maintenance or repair, where all the spoils of this automation flow to an increasingly tiny number of ruling elite.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

May-26

There must be a national incentive to get people into productive jobs. Without it, it doesn’t look good.  Do we have that incentive? The media actually seemed angry that our unemployment rate got so low.  Do they want it to go back down again or will a majority be satisfied if people don’t get back to work?

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