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Should we remove all National monuments so they don’t offend people?    The Newsy You: News of Today

Started Jun-15 by Showtalk; 1582 views.
Showtalk

Poll Question From Showtalk

Jun-15

Should we remove all National monuments so they don't offend people?
  • Yes, that would be a good start toward national healing0  votes
    0%
  • Yes, but only those that people complain about0  votes
    0%
  • Maybe a few selected monuments or statues to show we care0  votes
    0%
  • No, none should be removed. It is our history both positive and negative14  votes
    87%
  • We should let protestors decide which ones to destroy0  votes
    0%
  • I don't have an opinion0  votes
    0%
  • Other2  votes
    12%
Yes, that would be a good start toward national healing 
Yes, but only those that people complain about 
Maybe a few selected monuments or statues to show we care 
No, none should be removed. It is our history both positive and negative 
We should let protestors decide which ones to destroy 
I don't have an opinion 
Other 
kizmet1

From: kizmet1 

Jun-15

Sure, do it to remember the Nazis or whichever society cut up a nation's flag so everyone could have an inch of it. Soon, people forgot their past unity and were easy to take over.
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Jun-15

We may not have a choice if riots pull them down.  At seems to have stopped for now.

kizmet1

From: kizmet1 

Jun-15

We shall see. These people seem to have a vendetta.
MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad 

Jun-15

If you live in the south, you learn that there are two national histories.  There's the history of the United States.  And there's the history of the Confederate States of American and the myth of the lost cause.

In the south, especially in small towns, you're more likely to see statutes and memorials glorifying the CSA than statutes and memorials commemorating the USA.  There is a segment of the population of the USA whose ancestors were slaves, and they are offended by the memorials to a country which was created to defend ownership of another human, the CSA.

The question has been brought forward if memorials to slave owners, like Washington and Jefferson, who are commemorated for their contributions to the founding and early history of the nation, fit in the same category as those aggrandizing the CSA and the Lost Cause.

That's a very good question.

I guess it depends on what portion of our history is important to all Americans and is worthy of our memorializing and commemorating.  I can't answer for the segment of our population who finds glorifying the myth of the Lost Cause offensive.  Slavery is part of our history; the Civil War is part of our history.  Is it pertinent to our history to honor the nation which fought a war to sustain slavery?

Some statutes of Columbus have recently been torn down and others are slated for removal.  Is Columbus essential to our history? 

kizmet1

From: kizmet1 

Jun-16

From what I read a long time ago,the war was not just about slavery. Something about cotton.
Many were not black slaves. There were white slaves who were sent from Europe to work off the punishment England gave them (others went to Australia) (I saw this on an early Finding Your Roots genealogy show on PBS and hosted by a black man).
MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad 

Jun-16

The world was dependent on American cotton:                                        

By the late 1850s, cotton grown in the United States accounted for 77 percent of the 800 million pounds of cotton consumed in Britain. It also accounted for 90 percent of the 192 million pounds used in France, 60 percent of the 115 million pounds spun in the Zollverein, and 92 percent of the 102 million pounds manufactured in Russia.  https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2014/12/empire-of-cotton/383660/

Growing and processing cotton is labor intensive. Like all businesses, cotton agriculture sought cheap labor.  Slavery was the answer to the supply of  cheap labor.  You might find that article I just cited interesting.

If your argument is that the south initiated the Civil War to defend its economy, you'd be correct; however slavery was the base of that economy, so the CSA was created to defend slavery.    According to the Census of 1860, of the 31,443,322 persons counted, 3,953,762 were slaves.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1860_United_States_Census  That census has a breakdown of where the slaves were located by state.  Look at the slave versus free population in the states which seceded from the union.  The war was about retaining slavery and the prosperity it brought to plantation owners.

I have things to do.  I will address the other issue later.

kizmet1

From: kizmet1 

Jun-16

OK. Go do your things.
Part of the slaves were whites from England who were not sent to New Zealand or Australia. Many black slaves were used in non US places in the Carribean colonies of the French. (Good read is The Black Count about a mulatto born to slave and raised by his titled father in France. Grew very big and became a famous soldier against the Egyptians).
Again, PBS had a good piece on white slaves in US on Finding Your Roots,a genealogy series.
  • Edited June 16, 2020 4:39 pm  by  kizmet1
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Jun-16

Slavery was atrocious but it’s not happening today, or if so, it’s more about trafficking which is a different situation.  In contrast I’ve talked to people who are Jewish whose families were wiped out in WWII who say antisemitism is rampant today and mostly ignored by the media and protest groups.  Some of the protestors are targeting Jewish owned buildings and businesses.  I can’t begin to understand what it’s like to live in an areas where people still believe in the confederacy and what it stood for.  Overall, though, there is far less racism now than there ever has been.  Yet anti Jewish sentiment is everywhere.  It seems like our priorities are skewed if we aren’t trying to protect all racial and ethnic groups.

MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad 

Jun-16

You're right Tom Reiss's book is very good.  I thoroughly enjoyed it.  His son was Alexandre Dumas.

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