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Do you support the demonstrators against corrupt government in Beirut, Lebanon?   The Newsy You: News of Today

Started Aug-9 by MerlinsDad; 226 views.
MerlinsDad

Poll Question From MerlinsDad

Aug-9

Do you support the demonstrators against corrupt government in Beirut, Lebanon?
  • Yes5  votes
    45%
  • No1  vote
    9%
  • Maybe3  votes
    27%
  • What demonstrations?1  vote
    9%
  • Other1  vote
    9%
Yes 
No 
Maybe 
What demonstrations? 
Other 
In reply toRe: msg 1
MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad 

Aug-9

news item By Ben Hubbard and August 8

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/08/08/world/middleeast/Beirut-explosion-protests-lebanon.html?campaign_id=9&emc=edit_nn_20200809&instance_id=21118&nl=the-morning&regi_id=85883800&segment_id=35643&te=1&user_id=792b54e58091755fc36e32ed38715b43

Violent clashes between demonstrators and security forces transformed much of central Beirut into a battle zone of flying rocks, swinging batons and clouds of tear gas on Saturday, as the fury over a huge explosion in Beirut’s port this week fueled attacks on government buildings.

By nightfall, angry protesters demanding the ouster of the country’s political elite had stormed three government ministries, a handful of legislators had resigned, and the prime minister had called for early elections, the first major signs that the blast could shake up the country’s political system, widely derided as dysfunctional.

Many Lebanese considered the blast, which sent a shock wave through the capital that destroyed entire neighborhoods and killed at least 154 people, as only the latest and most dangerous manifestation of the corruption and negligence of the country’s leaders.

The clashes on Saturday erupted across broad swaths of the city’s center, with demonstrators yanking down barricades blocking access to the Parliament, chanting “Revolution! Revolution!,” and throwing rocks at the security forces, who flooded the area with tear gas and fired rubber bullets. Fires burned in nearby buildings, filling the sky with smoke, and sirens screamed as ambulances rushed the scores of people injured in the clashes to hospitals.

Elsewhere in the city, about 200 protesters, including a group of retired military officers, took over the Foreign Ministry building for a number of hours. They hung red banners with a raised fist from the building, which had been damaged in the blast, and proclaimed Beirut a “disarmed” city. The group left the building after the army arrived.

kizmet1

From: kizmet1 

Aug-9

I need to study it more to give a fair opinion.
MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad 

Aug-10

Lebanon's government stepped down on Monday night, less than a week after a massive explosion in Beirut killed more than 160 people and sparked days of violent protests.

News item by
https://www.cnn.com/2020/08/10/middleeast/lebanon-government-future-intl/index.html
 
Prime Minister Hassan Diab addressed the nation, announcing his resignation and that of his government in the wake of the blast, which he called a "disaster beyond measure."
 
In an impassioned speech, Diab berated Lebanon's ruling political elite for fostering what he called "an apparatus of corruption bigger than the state."
 
"We have fought valiantly and with dignity," he said, referring to members of his cabinet. "Between us and change is big powerful barrier."
Diab compared Tuesday's explosion to an "earthquake that rocked the country" prompting his government to resign. "We have decided to stand with the people," he said.
 
Three cabinet ministers had already quit, along with seven members of parliament.
Diab, a self-styled reformer, was ushered into power last December, two months after a popular uprising brought down the previous government. His government is composed of technocrats and had been supported by major political parties, including the Iran-backed political and militant group Hezbollah.
 
Now the country will be tasked with finding its third prime minister in less than a year, to contend with the spiraling crises Lebanon faces on a number of fronts.
kizmet1

From: kizmet1 

Aug-10

If they don't get it right at first, they can try, try, again.
MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad 

Aug-10

I hope they get it right soon.,

Yeah, next time they confiscate a 4,700 ton load of ammonium nitrate, maybe they'll learn to either get it spread on farmers' fields or dump most of it at sea instead of leave it in a warehouse with no heat or air conditioning for a decade until a fire finally burns into it and sets it off.

Like, maybe they can go down to the Texas Dept of Public Safety office and pick up a truckers' hazmat safe handling and storage handbook, which includes best industry practices for the transportation (and storage) of a whole bunch of things that can be quite dangerous if they are involved in a crash, a fire, or a spill.

Then there's a whole first responder handbook that you can look up from the U.N. number on the placard, that is full of international standards on how to safely deal with a bunch of stuff that they might come up on at, say, a warehouse fire, a train derailment, a jacknifed 18 wheeler, etc.

And those protocols are in use all around the world. I suspect they have a similar thing they should be following in Bejing or Dubai that will be the same protocol in downtown Dallas or Mexico City.

kizmet1

From: kizmet1 

Aug-10

At this point I doubt we know all the facts. Lebanon has had one war or another going for many generations. Lebanese (and Syrians) started moving here, to Allentown PA and Trinidad well over 100 years ago.
MerlinsDad

From: MerlinsDad 

Aug-10

Thank you for your comments.

kizmet1

From: kizmet1 

Aug-10

Sure, I have more.
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