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Is there pressure to stop social distancing in stores?   The Newsy You: News of Today

Started Sep-1 by Showtalk; 946 views.
Showtalk

Poll Question From Showtalk

Sep-1

Is there pressure to stop social distancing in stores?
  • Yes, my stores don't require it in aisles anymore and/or at entry points2  votes
    11%
  • Yes, other than cash register lines, distancing is disappearing4  votes
    23%
  • Yes, distancing has stopped0  votes
    0%
  • No, my stores still have oneway aisles, lines to enter and/or other policies5  votes
    29%
  • I haven't noticed1  vote
    5%
  • I don't enter stores2  votes
    11%
  • Other3  votes
    17%
Yes, my stores don't require it in aisles anymore and/or at entry points 
Yes, other than cash register lines, distancing is disappearing 
Yes, distancing has stopped 
No, my stores still have oneway aisles, lines to enter and/or other policies 
I haven't noticed 
I don't enter stores 
Other 
In reply toRe: msg 1
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Sep-1

In reply toRe: msg 2
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Sep-1

I’ve noticed other than plexiglass in front of the registers, most stores no longer limit the number of shoppers entering and don’t encourage distancing while shopping. This is true especially in grocery stores. A few have special hours for seniors or people at risk but even those are limited now.

Other. A mixture of 2 and 4 depending on the specific stores.

One of the WalMarts has been making aisles narrower so they are truly one way, and prominently marked. While I haven't personally seen one, I have heard that they are putting swinging gates across many aisles at the designated exits, that act like one-way valves. You go in one end, and you are committed to go all the way through to the far end of that aisle.

The other facet of this in those stores is that there are some other "aisles" that are now very open so you have room to pick and choose which aisle to go through with the cart to look for stuff.

I saw them moving shelves to narrow the aisles for one way conversion at the JBS Parkway store about a week or two ago. They had 10 people and 10 special pallet jack looking devices used to lift the entire row of shelves, so the entire thing could be just wheeled into position.

There were gaffer's tape marks already on the floor, and in a coordinated effort they just slid the shelf to its new position.

It looked like they had already moved about half a dozen shelves in a block near the pharmacy section to control traffic flow. Essentially each aisle was only wide enough that a single cart could pass.

I've also seen a couple of other stores that while there are signs about distancing, I don't see it really being as well enforced.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Sep-2

I’ve noticed the stores that still have direction arrows don’t get complaints about them. The ones who ignore distancing have most patrons over it,

I need to make the rounds through WalMart, Target, HEB, Market Street, and United supermarkets over the next couple of days and just see which ones still have one way aisles and such.

I remember seeing one store that had about 8 to 10 foot aisles that just had arrows marked out kind of like a highway, indicating you should "drive your shopping cart on the right-hand side of the road", and if your product is on the other side, do a U turn properly while maintaining distancing. They had enough room for passing and stuff.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Sep-2

That was early on. Now people just want to plow through and get out.  I was in a freezer section and a young woman suddenly started apologizing profusely to me, sounding like she was going to cry. I had barely even noticed her.  I looked to see what she was talking about and I guess she reached in front of me to get something and got too close.   I said, I’m not at all upset, please don’t worry about it.  She stopped and froze like I had said something terrible. I smiled but of course she couldn’t see because of the mask.  So I got my basket and left before she gave herself a panic attack.  

Showtalk said:

Now people just want to plow through and get out. I was in a freezer section and a young woman suddenly started apologizing profusely to me, sounding like she was going to cry. I had barely even noticed her. I looked to see what she was talking about and I guess she reached in front of me to get something and got too close. I said, I’m not at all upset, please don’t worry about it.

Poor lady.

Thing is, get in, get stuff, get out is likely going to result in far less virus exposure, because faster throughput means fewer people in a store at any given time.

kizmet1

From: kizmet1 

Sep-4

It depends on the size of the stores. Costco has big aisles and shoppers stand in lines, as usual at the check stands. Fred Meyer has markers on the floor for waiting at checkstands. Smaller places like Home Goods have arrows on the floors but shoppers are so interested in the new merchandise that they forget to follow the arrows on the floor.
Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk 

Sep-4

People seem to think if they don’t look at someone else, they can’t get infected.  Costco and other stores may have self check out which could mean less time waiting in lines because I’ve noticed in my market, hardly anyone uses it.

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