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This doesn't make any sense at all   The Consumer You: Marketplace

Started Sep-3 by MerlinsDad; 2222 views.
Showtalk said:

The recovery this year will be swift as soon as we get rid of the artificial limitations.

A huge number of small businesses that were depth-charged out by the economic shutdowns and loss of clientele are gone forever. Decades of blood sweat and tears by mom and pop outfits are gone forever. Those were the backbone of the American economy, that paid living wages to their workers, and didn't hyper-exploit them with heavily Dilbertized policies, the way the megacorps running large store chains and huge restaurant chains have been notorious for doing for quite some time.

So a lot of competition that kept megacorps in check is now gone, clearing the way for more monopolies and near-monopolies, fewer choices, higher prices, lower quality products, and horrible customer service.

With competition, people had alternatives, but of course the megacorps undercut the mom and pop outfits and tried to drive them out of business for a long time. The pandemic lockdowns were the nuclear weapon the megacorps happily exploited. So the top brass of all the big outfits such as WalMart, Target, Amazon, Ebay, etc. are raking in billions and billions while a lot of people are out of work who may never again find a job that pays what they used to make pre-pandemic, and may be monitored with a corporate surveillance network that the Stasi and KGB could only have dreamed of. And with so many competitors for fewer positions that are far less secure, it opens the door for the megacorp overlords to double down on micromanagement, toxic work environments, and more people trapped in situations they can't really escape because there's no place to job hop to any more.

Most of the big box stores and mega restaurant chains are, from horror stories I've read on line, some of the most awful places to have to work. We need less of those and more mom and pop entrepreneurs that can headhunt the best and brightest away and thus exert market forces on the megacorps to rein in some of the more stupid policies and practices.

 But for many people who have put in decades of their life to see that evaporate, it's probably the end of the line.

And the young folks also are less likely to recover. So yeah, there's going to be a recovery, but it will accelerate the trend of hollowing out the middle class. And loss of the middle class is always historically the precursor for a nation to go Communist or undergo violent revolution against the aristocracy by a rising number of peasants and serfs  with shrinking chances for upwards social and economic mobility.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Sep-17

We will see. The major indicators show this is temporary.

Alfi (THIALFI)

From: Alfi (THIALFI)

Sep-24

WHAT'S temporary? The loss of small businesses definitely is NOT.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Sep-24

No, the loss of small businesses is a tragedy. But overall the economy will recover.  An individual business owner might not. I have an old friend who is a Black male,  who lost a business years ago due to attrition. He did a lot of hard copy work that has since moved to people doing their own work on computers. He ended up going into nursing and loves it.  He was young enough he could change careers.

If the displaced workers can pivot to new industries or such, then it won't be that bad.

But those whose whole life is in a small business that has gone belly-up from this - we're looking at many that are too old to start over again, and so will spend their days that they expected to retire with dignity, as dependent wards of the State. We're talking about millions of small businesspeople who will likely never be able to

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Sep-24

That may be true. It’s hard to go from working for oneself to getting hired to work for someone else.

A lot of former entrepreneurs would find having to go work for some megacorp as a soul-crushing experience. For one, they would be used to making decisions and simply getting things done, while working for Dilbert's pointy-haired boss means a long convoluted process to solve even simple problems encountered. Most former entrepreneurs burn out very quickly in such a role, even if fairly young.

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Sep-25

I agree, some personalities cannot work in that type of setting.

Especially with an estimated 47% of new jobs where one is essentially competing with robots. They even call those "Cyborg Jobs" which now I think are more descriptive than the McJobs from the previous decade or two. These kind of jobs conjure up visions of the awful working conditions in a Charles Dickens novel or Upton Sinclair's "The Jungle":

from https://nypost.com/2019/07/13/inside-the-hellish-workday-of-an-amazon-warehouse-employee/

... Because of automation, human workers increasingly have to compete with computers and algorithms, Guendelsberger writes. But robots are still lacking when it comes to fine motor control and empathy. So many industries want a workforce that can “think, talk, feel and pick stuff up like humans — but with as few needs outside of work as robots.”  ... At Convergys, Guendelsberger was “lectured about how using the bathroom too often is the same thing as stealing from the company.” Every bathroom visit was clocked from the moment she left her cubicle, and a daily report of her bathroom time was sent to a supervisor for approval. ... Amazon workers carry around a scan gun, similar to what you might see at a grocery-store checkout, with an LCD screen listing tasks and a timer counting down exactly how many seconds remain to complete each one, according to the book. ... “It also tracks your location by GPS — and you take it everywhere with you, even the bathroom,” writes Guendelsberger. “Failure to stay ahead of the countdown was grounds for termination.”

Showtalk
Staff

From: Showtalk

Sep-25

That is too extreme for any employer. Tracking bathroom use? It’s also very invasive.

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